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Regina Beach residents say lack of public washrooms leading to ‘human waste’ along walking paths

The beach and service centre, managed by provincial park staff, are closed until further notice during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Joining crowds of Denver protesters brings risk of COVID-19 exposure. Here’s how to protect yourself — and when to get tested.

The demonstrations in downtown Denver over the death of George Floyd have the potential to increase coronavirus infections, although public health experts said Monday that it’s still too soon to know how big of a spike in cases Colorado could see.

Mayor Micheal Hancock over the weekend urged demonstrators — even those without symptoms — to get tested for the coronavirus at the Pepsi Center, where the city has a free, drive-up testing site.

People who want to be tested must first register online or by calling 311, and be prepared to get tested within 24 hours.

While the demonstrations have taken place outside, large crowds have gathered and authorities have deployed tear gas and fired pepper balls — all of which has the ability to increase the risk of protesters’ exposure during a respiratory pandemic.

“The use of any agent that’s going to generate a lot of coughing among people that are in dense group settings, when people are in close proximity, that’s absolutely going to elevate risks considerably,” said Glen Mays, a professor of health policy at the Colorado School of Public Health.

“These activities are important to be engaged in,” Mays said of the protests, which entered their fifth night in downtown Denver on Monday. He added, “It’s really unfortunate because both of the problems we are dealing with are rooted in discrimination and inequality.”

Demonstrators have taken to the streets of Denver and cities across the nation to protest systematic racism following the death of Floyd, a black man who was killed in Minnesota after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck for nearly nine minutes.

The pandemic also has highlighted existing racial inequalities as black Coloradans are dying from COVID-19 at a disproportionately high rate.

The protests come as Colorado has started to reopen businesses, restaurants and parks. And there are signs that social distancing polices implemented early on in the outbreak have slowed the spread of the novel coronavirus, with deaths and hospitalizations from COVID-19 declining in recent weeks.

These are good signs for those turning out to the protests, said Dr. Connie Savor Price, chief medical officer at Denver Health.

“Of the people who are gathering together, fewer of them are likely to be infected based on the data that we have from our city and state,” she said, adding, “We’ll know more about the impact of these protests in the coming days.”

Rachel Herlihy, the state epidemiologist, estimates that one in every 300 Coloradans could be carrying the coronavirus, and she said it is difficult to trace who might have stood near an infected person in a large crowd.

“That obviously is challenging to do in an environment where you don’t know who you’ve had contact with,” Herlihy said.

The new coronavirus mostly spreads via droplets when someone shouts, chants, sneezes or coughs, and people are most at risk when they are within 3 to 6 feet of an infected person, including carriers of the virus who don’t have symptoms, said Dr. Michelle Barron, medical director of infection control and prevention at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital.

“We don’t really have a good sense of what that risk is,” she said, adding, “It depends on the moment because if they’re actively walking and moving there’s less likely risk of exposure.”

Medical and public health experts said attendees should monitor themselves for symptoms, which can appear between two and 14 days after exposure, and include fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, loss of taste or smell, and nausea, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Any large gathering of people in tight proximity to each other can facilitate the spread of COVID-19, so we are asking anyone who believes they may have been exposed (whether at a protest or otherwise) to take advantage of the free COVID-19 testing available at the Pepsi Center,” said Laura Swartz, spokeswoman for the city’s joint information center, in an email.

She said the risk of exposure for the coronavirus at the protests is “really high,” and that the city will not be asking those who get tested if they’ve attended a protest.

To stay safe during a protest and limit transmission of COVID-19, attendees should wear a mask and goggles, and should sanitize their hands after touching anything communal and before touching their face. Protesters should also limit how close they are to others — standing six feet apart is possible at the demonstrations — and practice social distancing during other times, according to medical and public health experts.

Public health experts also suggested finding ways that demonstrations can be held so that the risk of exposure is reduced for those pushing for social changes.

“Silent protests are probably safer,” said Dr. Krutika Kuppalli, an infectious diseases physician and biosecurity fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

Denver Post staff writer Meg Wingerter contributed to this report. 

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Inslee statement on Trump’s threat to deploy military to put down protests

Gov. Jay Inslee responded to President's Trump's threat to deploy the military in response to protesters tonight. 


Kingston small business owner says the CECRA program should be in the hands of renters to apply

Small business owners say commercial landlords may not opt into the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance (CECRA) program.


Waterton Lakes National Park opens its gates to visitors

Waterton Lakes National Park has officially opened its gates to visitors, and despite strong health guidelines related to COVID-19, plenty of people made the journey on Monday.


Putting garbage in recycling bins a $100 fine in North Battleford, Sask.

Starting on June 1, the City of North Battleford says it will enforce recycling rules that prohibit non-recyclable materials from being placed in blue recycle bins.


Canada sees lowest daily coronavirus death toll in 2 months with 759 new cases

Monday's new COVID-19 infections nearly matched the number reported Sunday, and marked the seventh day in a row with a number in the triple digits.


FW: Traffic Alert/Shrewsbury

The roadway is now reopened   From: Kelsey, Jenna Sent: Monday, June 1, 2020 4:01 PM To: DPS - Roadway Alert Cc: DPS - B1 Disp Subject: Traffic Alert/Shrewsbury   Vt Route 103 is closed in the area of John C. Stewart and Sons in Shrewsbury for a motor vehicle accident.   This incident is


Rock star Ben Howard hopes ‘to grow communal farm’

Double Brit award-winning Ben Howard wants to encourage "growth and opportunity" on the Devon site.


Strong winds leave parts of Saskatoon without power

Strong winds damaged some trees and caused power outages across Saskatoon on Monday morning.


Puffins’ Farne Islands nesting areas ‘may expand without tourists’

The Farne Islands off Northumberland have been closed to the public during the coronavirus outbreak.


Uber boss in Hong Kong doubles down on commitment to city despite dip in US-China relations and looming national security law

Uber’s boss in Hong Kong has re-emphasised the firm’s commitment to the city, despite the ongoing deterioration in US-China relations and the looming national security law.Estyn Chung, the ride-hailing firm’s general manager, said he was optimistic about the future and added that Uber had been serious about its offer to relocate its Asia-Pacific headquarters to Hong Kong, despite it presently being illegal for its drivers to operate in the city.Chung also said the move would create jobs and…


Fifth night of George Floyd protests underway in Denver

Denver police Chief Paul Pazen linked arms with two black men Monday evening and walked past the City-County Building as demonstrators began the fifth day of protests over the death of George Floyd at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis.

Chiefs and police officers in other cities have mingled with protesters but this is Pazen’s first time meeting face-to-face with demonstrators. The images of the chief in his regular uniform and only wearing a cloth mask to protect him from the novel coronavirus provided a contrast to images of Denver police officers in riot gearing firing tear gas at people during previous protests.

As on the previous days, Monday’s demonstrations began peacefully. With people walking and chanting through the heart of downtown.

Lucas Simonis went on Facebook and asked people to bring flowers to place along police barricades. He figured only a few close friends would participate but hundreds latched onto the idea.

“This is meant to be a way to keep things positive and calm and to make sure everyone knows we’re unified in a goal of nonviolence and earnest desire for change,” Simonis said.

Protests over George Floyd’s death began Thursday night in Denver and have brought days of unrest as people chant and march over the deaths of black people at the hands of law enforcement. But the demonstrations also have erupted into violence with police officers firing tear gas and foam bullets at protesters as people vandalized businesses and government buildings, including setting fires. Some protesters have lobbed rocks and bottles toward police, and Mayor Michael Hancock said during a Monday morning interview on Colorado Public Radio that officers have confiscated weapons, including assault rifles.

Hancock on Monday extended an emergency curfew order through the week, telling residents they must be off the streets by 9 p.m. The first curfew was put in place on Saturday, but protesters have ignored the order and remained on the state Capitol grounds well past their deadline to leave.

Since protests began on Thursday, Denver police have arrested 284 people, including 170 who were cited on Sunday. Violations have ranged from assault on a peace officer to burglary and arson to a curfew violations.

Many organizers have urged fellow protesters to remain peaceful, and volunteers have cleaned graffiti off monuments and buildings even as others were shouting and marching.

Taroya Hawthorne brought her 11-year-old and 7-year-old to the Capitol Monday morning to get a sense of the mood and to listen to others. She’s married to a veteran police officer in Alabama. She understands why people are mad and even though she does not condone violence, said, “It’s been going on for too long. When you do it peacefully, it’s like you’re not getting heard.”


Toronto lawyer reflects on local incidents of anti-Black racism, police brutality

"We've been looking at this issue of police violence and people dying in police custody for decades, and people have come up with so many recommendations and pathways pointing to ways to save lives and it just hasn't been implemented."


Londoners rally in support of Black Lives Matter to denounce police brutality

Black Lives Matter London is hosting a physical distancing rally in London's Victoria Park from 3 to 6 p.m. this Saturday, June 6.


First California prison employee dies of coronavirus

California's state prison system had its first known staff death due to the coronavirus, officials said, as well as the death of the 10th inmate from the virus. The prison … Click to Continue »


Alberta leaders denounce racism as Black community calls for action

After a weekend of pain and unrest across America, leaders in Alberta are speaking out against racism.


San Diego police to stop using blood-stopping neck restraint

Police in San Diego, the nation's eighth-largest city, will immediately stop using the carotid restraint in the wake of nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd after he was … Click to Continue »


Personhood debate: Colorado Supreme Court rules child abuse can’t happen in the womb

In a split decision, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled Monday that those who injure unborn babies can’t be prosecuted for child abuse, even if the infant is born and survives an in utero attack with lifelong injuries.

In the 4-3 decision, the majority of justices found that the state’s child abuse law is unclear as to whether child abuse can happen in the womb. Because of that ambiguity, the court followed a last-resort approach that obligated them to rule in favor of the defense and found that Andre Jones, 38, of Fountain, who was convicted of shooting his pregnant wife in the stomach — killing her and causing lasting injuries to her unborn daughter  — cannot be convicted of child abuse, even though the girl still suffers from debilitating neurological damage.

The ruling is another step in a years-long and nuanced debate about whether fetuses ought to be recognized as persons under state law — a hot-button topic with wide-ranging implications stretching from abortion to the criminal prosecution of pregnant women.

Practically, the court’s ruling will likely stop the prosecution of suspects who injure unborn children on child abuse charges if the child survives the attack. But the decision also leaves open the possibility that fetuses can be considered persons under Colorado law and puts it in the hands of state lawmakers to clarify whether unborn babies should be protected under the state’s child abuse statutes, said Aya Gruber, a professor of law at the University of Colorado Boulder.

“It’s kind of wild that they’re saying, ‘It’s not clear to us on the face of it that the word ‘person’ doesn’t really mean ‘person or fetus,’ she said. “In other words, they’re saying it is a completely plausible facial meaning of the word ‘person’ to include ‘fetus.’ That part of it all seems like a pretty big blow to the anti-personhood [movement] and maybe a symbolic victory for the personhood movement.”

The majority of justices could not determine whether lawmakers intended to protect unborn fetuses under the child abuse statute by using the statute’s plain language or through other legal methods, including considering common law doctrine that says child abuse prosecutions are permissible if a child injured in utero is born alive, according to the 31-page majority opinion supported by Justices William Hood, Monica Marquez, Richard Gabriel and Melissa Hart.

“We are particularly concerned that adopting the ‘born alive’ doctrine to define a criminal element would usurp the role of the legislature,” Hood wrote. “Therefore, we decline the temptation to make law, no matter how sympathetic the alleged victim.”

But in a 29-page dissent, Chief Justice Nathan Coats and Justices Brian Boatright and Carlos Samour call the majority’s opinion a “policy decision” that goes beyond the court’s role and does, in fact, usurp the role of the legislature.

They argue that lawmakers’ ambiguity in the child abuse statute was intentional, and lawmakers’ subsequent refusal to clarify the language — despite a decade-old appeal from the courts to do so — shows legislators wanted to allow for the criminal prosecution of suspects who injure unborn babies when those babies are born and live with lasting injuries.

“In the simplest of terms, the majority does in two paragraphs what the legislature has declined to do for over ten years: it redefines the definition of ‘child’ in the child abuse statute,” Boatright wrote in the dissent.

He argued that the court did not need to follow its last-resort decision making method — which defaults the judgment in favor of the defendant — because the legislature’s intent can be understood from the lack of action and through common sense.

“As a result of Jones’ actions, this child stands as an independent victim, separate and apart from her mother,” he wrote. “She will suffer for her entire life because of the defendant’s actions. Surely the legislature did not intend to disregard her as a victim.”

Jones was convicted of killing his estranged wife, Lakeisha Jones, 32, in 2013. Prosecutors said he broke into her apartment, waited for her to come home and shot her in the belly as she unlocked her door.

On Monday, the court overturned Jones’ conviction for first-degree murder in the case and ordered that he be granted a new trial after finding that his right to a public trial was violated when the judge excluded his parents from the courtroom during the testimony of two witnesses.

Jones cannot be retried on the child abuse charge.

A spokesman for Attorney General Phil Weiser, whose office brought the appeal to the state’s highest court, was not immediately available for comment Monday.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado was unavailable for comment and Colorado Right to Life did not return a request for comment.


Colorado may start allowing guided groups for fishing, biking, climbing and other outdoor recreation

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is soliciting public input on a draft of proposed rules regarding outdoor recreation with new Safer at Home guidelines due to be finalized on Thursday.

The invitation to public comment came as Gov. Jared Polis issued an executive order on Monday relaxing restrictions on “high-risk” Coloradans — those 65 years old and older, along with those who have underlying health conditions — who were previously required to stay at home due to COVID-19. Monday’s executive order says they are now “encouraged” to enjoy the Colorado outdoors, with social distancing, while staying at home “as much as possible.”

The draft guidance for outdoor recreation would allow unguided outdoor recreation of any kind for groups of up to 10 people. It would allow guided groups for fishing, biking, horseback riding, canoeing, kayaking, climbing and other activities for groups of up to 10. River outfitters, rafting and Jeep tours could occur if parties in boats or Jeeps were limited to household members.

The draft also includes a long list of rules for operators and recreators to follow. The public has until noon on Wednesday to weigh in.

Regarding the relaxation of at-risk people recreating outdoors, Monday’s executive order says “vulnerable individuals” should “stay at home or in the vast, great outdoors away from others as much as possible” while continuing to limit social interactions, maintaining 6-foot distancing and wearing face coverings. Vulnerable individuals include those 65 or older along with individuals with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma, serious heart conditions, those who are immunocompromised, pregnant women and those “determined to be high risk by a licensed healthcare provider.”

“Our state has some of the most beautiful natural open spaces in the world and we want Coloradans to enjoy our vast, great outdoors,” Polis said in a news release. “Coloradans have to remain diligent, and must continue staying home or in the great outdoors away from others as much as possible, wearing masks when we leave the house, and washing our hands. Over these next few weeks, each and every one of us has a responsibility to protect ourselves and others, especially as we begin venturing out onto our trails and open space.”

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, The Adventurist, to get outdoors news sent straight to your inbox.


Merced County hits 301 total confirmed coronavirus cases, 10 weeks after first infection

Merced County total infections of coronavirus hit 301 on Monday, roughly 10 weeks since the first case was reported, according to Merced County Department of Public Health. The tally includes … Click to Continue »


LA has seen racial uprisings, many not shocked by new round

When violent protests over the death of George Floyd, a black man pinned down by a white Minneapolis officer, reached Los Angeles, people of color expressed heartbreak but not necessarily … Click to Continue »


Lockdown break-ups and job changes boost rentals

Supply of new properties for rent is not keeping up with demand, property giant Rightmove says.


Proposed rules would let Colorado pools, playgrounds reopen, recreational sports restart

As Colorado’s coronavirus numbers continue to improve, Gov. Jared Polis released draft orders Monday on the reopening of swimming pools and playgrounds and the resumption of youth and adult recreational sports leagues.

The rules would allow outdoor swimming pools to open at half capacity or for up to 50 people, whichever is fewer. Up to 10 people at a time would be allowed on playgrounds. People who don’t belong to the same household would have to stay 6 feet apart, and extra cleaning and disinfecting requirements would be in place.

Denver city officials, however, said last week that city pools and playgrounds would be closed at least through June 30.

The public can comment on the recommendations until noon Wednesday, the governor’s office announced in a news release, and the state will finalize the rules Thursday. The proposed orders come more than a month after Polis’ Safer at Home plan began the process of reopening the state.

Sports leagues would be allowed to have groups of up to 25 participants outdoors and 10 indoors under the proposal. Outdoor tennis and basketball courts would be permitted to open to up to 10 people at a time. Masks are encouraged under the draft guidelines.

Draft guidance for places of worship, also released, would allow them to open at 50% capacity or with up to 50 people in the worship space, whichever is fewer. Masks would be required at all times. For outdoor worshiping, participants should be spaced 6 feet apart.

Polis also issued an order Monday allowing short-term rentals to reopen as long as hosts provide hand sanitizer or soap and water, cleaning products and wait a day before entering the property for cleaning.

While the orders relax some restrictions, Polis called for Coloradans to remain diligent and continue to distance themselves from each other as much as possible, wear face coverings and wash their hands often.

“It may feel like we are getting back to normal, but the virus is still here, and it could surge back the moment we let our guard down,” he said in the release. “We are still far from normal.”

Additional information on the draft plans and other regulations is available at covid19.colorado.gov.


Crash State Highway 41 milepost 14

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

DO NOT REPLY

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Idaho State Police

Regional Communication Center - North

615 W Wilbur Ave

Suite A

Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83815

Please direct questions to the appropriate District Offices

District 1 (208) 209-8620 Fax (208) 209- 8618

District 2 (208) 799-5150

PRESS RELEASE FOR DISTRICT ONE CASE # C20001147

--------------------- PRESS RELEASE -----------------------------

On Monday, June 1, 2020, a commercial vehicle crash occurred on SH41 near milepost 14, south of Spirit Lake, Idaho. A white Freightliner semi truck with two loaded trailers of lumber was being driven by Danny Markley (66 year old male of Medial Lake, WA). Markley was northbound when he failed to negotiate a left curve. He drove off the east side of the roadway, where the truck and trailers rolled, spilling the load. A diesel spill of approximately 30-40 gallons was contained at the scene. Markley was wearing a seat belt, and was uninjured. The roadway was blocked for approximately two hours. Alcohol was not believed to be a factor in the crash. Investigation continues.

DSP INITIALS SJT

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Man run over and stabbed in Harrow ‘in critical condition’

The victim, thought to be in in his late teens, was attacked in north-west London on Monday night.


Some parking enforcement measures in Denver resume after COVID-19 break

Some parking enforcement activities resumed Monday in Denver, including the restart of parking meters downtown and elsewhere.

Parking enforcement in Denver was suspended in March because of COVID-19 concerns. Downtown-area parking meters are operational and will run from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., the according to a city news release said. Parking meters beyond downtown are also operational, and people should follow the posted price, limits and hours of operation.

Enforcement of time-limited, non-metered parking spaces and residential parking programs also resumes. Existing permit holders should renew expired permits, and residents eligible for residential parking permits should apply and check their status online at www.parksmartdenver.com, the release said. People unable to provide necessary permit documentation because of COVID-19 illness can pursue a 90-day temporary permit online.

Street sweeping enforcement in Denver will resume on July 1 as will enforcement of 72-hour parking limits.

Fire hydrant clearances and other safety zone measures remained in effect during the safe-at-home and safer-at-home guidelines. School bus loading zones will go back into enforcement when school resumes.

Vehicles towed because of street paving operations will be left in about a two-block radius of where the car was parked without a citation, according to the release. Residents who need help finding such vehicles can call (720) 913-2000 for assistance.

 


Experts encourage parents to speak to children about anti-Black racism, police brutality

"Have the dialogue, have the discussion, and talk about what is right from wrong. It's really important to take a stand."


E-scooters return to Edmonton streets with COVID-19 restrictions

After being delayed two months because of the COVID-19 pandemic, electric scooter companies Lime and Bird Canada both returned to Edmonton streets on Monday.


Troopers Arrest Man with Stolen Gun

Shortly after midnight on Sunday Trooper Ryan Crumbaker, assigned to State Police-Framingham, was conducting speed enforcement on the ramp from Route 93 Southbound to Route 95 southbound in Canton. At that time he observed a white Honda approach his location traveling much faster than the posted speed limit of 30 miles per hour. Trooper Crumbaker…


Charles Schwab & Co. Rehoboth donates to KSI’s ‘The Better Half’ campaign

In early May, Kent-Sussex Industries Inc. initiated "The Better Half" campaign to help offset funding losses resulting from the COVID-19 shutdown by encouraging people to make a donation to KSI using "the better half" or part of their economic stimulus funds as a means of support.Several contributors reached out to support the agency as it plans and prepares to provide services once state and federal guidelines permit.KSI is a not-for-profit agency providing vocational [...]


Deaths in Colorado caused by COVID-19 rise by 4 as hospitalizations reach new post-peak low

After two straight days with no new deaths caused by COVID-19 reported to Colorado’s health department, the state’s tally inched up by four Monday, while the number of fatalities among people who had the coronavirus — even if it didn’t directly kill them — rose by 13.

The deaths announced by Colorado’s Department of Public Health and Environment each day did not necessarily occur in the past 24 hours, as there can be a lag of days or even weeks in reporting them to the state. That’s particularly true for those whose death certificates show they died from the COVID-19 respiratory disease.

State health officials recently began reporting the number of people who died who had been infected by the virus, and not necessarily killed by it, as well as those whose deaths have been directly attributed to COVID-19.

As of Monday, 1,458 people with the coronavirus had died in Colorado and 1,185 deaths were directly caused by COVID-19.

Hospitalizations of coronavirus patients continue to drop, with 272 people currently hospitalized for COVID-19 in Colorado, the lowest level since March 26 — a new low from the state’s mid-April peak, when more than 200 people were being hospitalized with the virus every day.

All told, 4,372 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 since the virus was first confirmed in the state in early March. And 30 coronavirus patients have been discharged or transferred to a lower level of care in the last 24 hours.

State data also shows that 318 of Colorado’s 1,093 available ventilators are in use, and that none of the hospitals surveyed expected shortages of personal protective equipment or intensive care unit beds in the next week. Four facilities did expect staffing shortages.

Private facilities and the state-run lab tested 5,069 people on Sunday, a drop after several days of high testing levels that brings Colorado’s daily testing rate to 89 tests per 100,000 people per day. That’s much lower than the 152 tests per 100,000 people level that health officials say is needed to understand where the virus is spreading.

To date, 26,577 people have tested positive for or are believed to have COVID-19 in Colorado, though health officials say they believe the true number is much higher.

Officials also have confirmed outbreaks at 282 contained facilities across the state, including nursing homes, jails and factories — one more than the previous day.


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Coronavirus: It’s back to school for some Montreal-area students

Classes resumed at the MacKay Centre and Philip E. Layton Schools Monday, the first two special-needs facilities in the EMSB to do so.


Huntsville police prepare and protect the right to protest

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Protests all over the country are fighting against injustice. Some of them have remained peaceful, while others have escalated.

Over the weekend in Huntsville, peace remained at the center of the protests, but Lt. Michael Johnson with the Huntsville Police Department says they are prepared for anything.

“If a protest does turn violent – and we would not like to think that protesters themselves are violent, it’s actually those that infiltrate protest situations – we do have a team of officers, along with general patrol, that know how to react to these situations,” said Lt. Johnson.

He adds that the officers’ plan for each situation constantly changes.

“We do tweak our plans literally on the move,” Lt. Johnson said. “Whether it’s an increase in possible officer presence or increase in contingency plans for things that happen.”

The department commends the protests over the weekend for having no violence and no property damage, unlike other cities in the state.

“I think everyone walked away with more sense of security for our city and more sense of resolve for how law enforcement is going to continue moving forward… healing and mending these wounds that we’re seeing across the country,” said Lt. Johnson.

While it is the job of police officers to maintain peace in the city, Lt. Johnson says they are also focused on protecting the rights of protesters to make sure they’re voices are heard.

“First and foremost, that is absolutely what we actually plan for, is protecting those that are trying to express their first amendment rights,” he said. “It’s something fundamental across the country. It’s something that we know historically has been protected here with our police department.

And the Huntsville Police Department plans to keep it that way.

Some of the protests around the city might require a permit, while others do not. If you would like to organize a rally, you can check with HPD to see if a permit would be necessary, and they will help you out.


LA officials worry protests could lead to more virus cases

Public health authorities are worried there could be a spike in coronavirus cases as thousands of people march in protests that in turn have forced some virus testing centers to … Click to Continue »


Charles Alfonso becomes Bayhealth’s 1st certified stroke rehabilitation specialist

Charles Alfonso is the first therapist at Bayhealth to hold the title of certified stroke rehabilitation specialist, and among only three in Delaware with this certification, Bayhealth announced June 1.In his role with the inpatient physical therapy department at Bayhealth, Alfonso said he enjoys working with acute care patients. The certification makes him better-equipped to help those who’ve suffered a stroke with their physical challenges.As a traveling [...]


The National Guard is coming to Sacramento. What can the troops do in a domestic riot?

Thousands of California National Guard troops are on “standby” as the state braces for more protests over law enforcement killings of black men, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday. He has … Click to Continue »


Disturbance

100 block State St.
Members of the MPD's Special Events Team (SET) were in the area of upper State Street early this morning attempting to stop looters from shattering & #8230;


Coronavirus: YMCAs in Regina prepare to welcome back clients as part of Phase 3

YMCAs in Regina are getting ready to reopen its doors to the public as part of Phase 3 of Saskatchewan's reopen plan.


Unrest emerges in neighborhoods, suburbs beyond city centers

Vandals robbed malls and shopping centers in communities outside Chicago. They stormed stores across the San Francisco Bay in what appeared to be coordinated smash-and-grabs. Banks and a sleek, modern … Click to Continue »


Pres. Trump delivers remarks as protests grow across the country

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR/AP) — President Donald Trump addressed the nation from the Rose Garden Monday evening as protests continue across the country in response to George Floyd’s death.

Trump said he spoke with governors, and is strongly recommending the deploy of the National Guard in an effort to “dominate the streets” with an “overwhelming law enforcement presence.”

Trump earlier on Monday derided many governors as “weak” and demanded tougher crackdowns on burning and stealing among some demonstrations in the aftermath of violent protests in dozens of American cities.

Trump spoke to governors on a video teleconference that also included law enforcement and national security officials, telling the state leaders they “have to get much tougher.”

“Most of you are weak,” Trump said. “You have to arrest people.”

The days of protests were triggered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. The demonstrations turned violent in several cities, with people trashing stores, smashing and burning police cars and igniting fires in historic Lafayette Park across from the White House.

Accused by critics of doing too little to defuse the crisis, Trump was to address the nation early Monday evening.

The president urged the governors to deploy the National Guard, which he credited for helping calm the situation Sunday night in Minneapolis. He demanded that similarly tough measures be taken in cities that also experienced violence, including New York, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

“You’ve got to arrest people, you have to track people, you have to put them in jail for 10 years and you’ll never see this stuff again,” said Trump. “We’re doing it in Washington, D.C. We’re going to do something that people haven’t seen before.”

The president told the governors they were making themselves “look like fools” for not calling up more of the National Guard as a show for force on city streets.

Attorney General Bill Barr, who was also on the call, told governors that a joint terrorist task force would be used to track agitators and urged local officials to “dominate” the streets and control, not react to crowds. He urged the governors to “go after troublemakers.”

Trump’s angry exhortations at the nation’s governors came after a Sunday night of escalating violence, images of fires and looting and clashes with police filling the nation’s airwaves and overshadowing the largely peaceful protests. The protests had grown so heated Friday night that the Secret Service rushed the president to an underground bunker previously used during terrorist attacks.

On Monday, Trump also spoke of trying to criminalize flag-burning. The Supreme Court has conservative new members since it last ruled on that issue, and Trump said that “I think it’s time to review that again.”

He continued his effort to project strength, using inflammatory tweets and delivering partisan attacks.

As cities have burned night after night and images of violence have dominated television coverage, Trump’s advisers have discussed the prospect of an Oval Office address in an attempt to ease tensions. The notion was quickly scrapped for lack of policy proposals and the president’s own seeming disinterest in delivering a message of unity.

Trump did not appear in public on Sunday and was not scheduled to on Monday either.

The demonstrations in Washington appeared to catch officers by surprise. They sparked one of the highest alerts at the White House complex since the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001.

Trump has told advisers he worries about his safety, while both privately and publicly praising the work of the Secret Service.

Demonstrators returned Sunday afternoon, facing off against police at Lafayette Park into the evening. Trump retweeted a message from a conservative commentator encouraging authorities to respond with greater force.

“This isn’t going to stop until the good guys are willing to use overwhelming force against the bad guys,” Buck Sexton wrote in a message amplified by the president.

In recent days security at the White House has been reinforced by the National Guard and additional personnel from the Secret Service and the U.S. Park Police.

The Justice Department deployed members of the U.S. Marshals Service and agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration to supplement National Guard troops outside the White House, according to a senior Justice Department official. The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke on the condition of anonymity.


Amid protests, Colorado lawmakers float bill to counter police brutality

Colorado lawmakers returned to the Capitol on Monday, walking past spray-painted messages like “good cop = dead cop,” mere hours after the building’s grounds were covered with a massive crowd of protesters and tear gas filled the air.

For portions of the day, a spectator inside the building would have had no reason to think that anything has changed recently even as as outside protesters trickled onto the Capitol lawn for a fifth day of unrest over George Floyd’s death. In the Senate, lawmakers debated a bill concerning union powers. The House took up a slew of bills, including one proposing to change standards for how egg-laying hens are housed.

But some lawmakers, already swamped by a myriad of coronavirus-related challenges — among other tasks, they’re trying to quickly pass a budget with about $3 billion in cuts — say that the message of the protests is not lost on them, and that they intend to take action.

Rep. Leslie Herod, a Denver Democrat who has joined protesters downtown during the day, is planning to introduce a bill as soon as Tuesday that she said is aimed at addressing police brutality and accountability in Colorado by removing the shield of immunity for prosecution from law enforcement officers found to have acted unlawfully. It would allow them to be sued in their individual capacities; currently attorney fees and settlements are paid out by cities and counties at taxpayer expense.

The news organization Denverite, reporting a snapshot of an eight-month period, found in 2017 that $2.78 million in taxpayer money had gone to eight Denver Police Department settlements.

“I believe law enforcement should be held to a standard of integrity, respect and responsibility and the bill will reflect that,” Herod told The Denver Post on Monday. “We need to ensure that law enforcement officers who act outside of their authority, who harm and murder people, especially people of color, unlawfully, are held accountable.”

Herod said a Denver Post investigation into police shootings across the state sparked conversations about the issue at the beginning of the session, and since the killing of George Floyd, lawmakers have brought those conversations back. She also said she’s working with the black and Latinx caucuses, and that Senate President Leroy Garcia, a Pueblo Democrat, is working with her on the bill. That his name will be attached is an indication not only of where he stands on the bill but of the odds that it gets passed; a member of leadership generally has power to ensure their bill gets a serious hearing in a way other members may not.

Garcia’s remarks about police violence and public trust in law enforcement have been significantly more pointed than those from Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Gov. Jared Polis.

“This isn’t just about what’s going on in other states,” Garcia said. “This is about what’s happening in our own backyards. And sadly, we shouldn’t need body cams and people using their cell phones to catch the lack of integrity. We must address the issues that are associated with police brutality and this bias or it’s going to erode the profession.”

Garcia said law enforcement agencies in Colorado do a good job when first hiring officers to ensure they meet standards, but they need to continue to monitor them.

He said he believes most cops are heroes but added in an interview Monday: “We have officers who lack integrity and violate the law, every day, that they’re sworn to uphold. We should care about that as elected officials.”

Other lawmakers spoke publicly Monday on the protests, including Rep. James Coleman, a Denver Democrat who from the House floor called for holding “law enforcement officers who abuse their privilege accountable,” and who condemned rioting but said he supports the right to protest.

“I’ve had to talk to my son,” said Sen. Rhonda Fields, an Aurora Democrat who sits on the Black Caucus with Coleman. “We have to teach our young men how to behave when you get pulled over by the police, because if you don’t, you might end up not being about to breathe.”


Brooms in hand, people patch up stores damaged in protests

Carrying brooms, shovels, trash bags and cans of paint, thousands of people from Los Angeles to New York swept up glass from broken store windows, covered over graffiti and organized … Click to Continue »


Weapons Violation

200 block W. Gilman St.
MPD Special Event Team (SET) officers spotted a man tucking a loaded handgun in the back of his pants last night. Kyle C. Quade, age 28, & #8230;


Jillinski inducted into Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi

Sherry Jilinski, of Camden, was recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation's oldest and most selective all-discipline collegiate honor society.Jilinski was initiated at the University of Florida.


Carper, Coons call for investigation into racial discrimination, violence at Minneapolis Police Department

Sens. Tom Carper and Chris Coons, both D-Delaware, joined Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith, both D-Minnesota, and 24 of their colleagues in calling on the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice to conduct an investigation into the patterns and practices of racially discriminatory and violent policing in the Minneapolis Police Department."Given the repeated instances of police violence that have resulted in the deaths of several citizens — a disproportionate [...]


US may open doors to Hongkongers in response to China’s push for national security law, Mike Pompeo says

The United States is considering the option of welcoming people from Hong Kong in response to China’s push to impose national security legislation in the former British colony, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in remarks released on Monday.Influential Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell told that chamber on Monday he hoped the Trump administration would soon identify specific ways to “impose costs on Beijing” for curbing freedoms in Hong Kong, and said the United States should mirror…


Coons calls for Judiciary Committee oversight after killing of George Floyd

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Delaware, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, joined Fox News’ America’s Newsroom on May 29 to discuss the death of George Floyd."I think in the wake of the tragic murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, the Judiciary Committee ought to be convening an oversight hearing where we look into the whole string of tragic killings, of incidents that are deeply wounding to our country, of police violence and then of response by communities," said [...]


Denver protests live: Updates from June 1 demonstrations at the Capitol

After a weekend of protests at the Colorado Capitol, Denver began a fifth straight night of demonstrations Monday. The local protests mirror scenes across the country following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Floyd was a black man killed when a white police officer, who has since been fired and arrested, knelt on the back of Floyd’s neck for several minutes as Floyd screamed “I can’t breathe!”

Earlier this week, protesters were met by heavily armed police in Denver who used tear gas, non-lethal bullets and more to disperse crowds.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock extended the city’s emergency curfew that orders residents to return home by 9 p.m. Those who violate the curfew could be arrested, like the 83 who are facing charges after breaking Saturday’s curfew.

Previous coverage

  • A protestor stands in a cloud ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A protester stands in a cloud of gas from police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Police stand ready to disperse the ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Police stand ready to disperse the crowd by force during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Demonstrators flee law enforcement officers firing ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    Demonstrators flee law enforcement officers firing non-lethal rounds towards them near Civic Center Park during a George Floyd protest May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Protesters attend to a fellow protester ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    Protesters attend to a fellow protester who was shot with a projectile by Denver police Civic Center Park during a George Floyd protest May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Law enforcement officers fire pepper balls ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    Law enforcement officers fire pepper balls and tear gas towards demonstrators near Civic Center Park during a George Floyd protest May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Braxton Robertson pleads with the police ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Braxton Robertson pleads with the police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd Ð the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained Ð in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Two anonymous men lock arms with ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Two anonymous men lock arms with fellow protestors in the face of a line of police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Braxton Robertson pleads with the police ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Braxton Robertson pleads with the police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • A man who asked to remain ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A man who asked to remain anonymous stands with fellow protestors in the face of a line of police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Police and protestors stand off on ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Police and protestors stand off on Broadway near the state capitol during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protestors line up against police during ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Protestors line up against police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Alexis Stepp shakes hands with a ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Alexis Stepp shakes hands with a police officer as fellow protestors face off with the police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Andrew Anslover bulls back his mask ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Andrew Anslover pulls back his mask to reveal his face and eyes after being doused with milk upon being sprayed by police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protestors line up against police during ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Protestors line up against police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • A police officer stands near the ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A police officer stands near the library on Broadway during a protest after the killing of George Floyd - the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained - in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protesters gets in the faces of ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    Protesters gets in the faces of Denver police officers gathered near Colfax Ave and Broadway on the third day of George Floyd protests in Denver May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Police stand ready to disperse the ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Police stand ready to disperse the crowd by force during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Michael leads a chant during a ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Michael leads a chant during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protesters face off with law enforcement ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Protesters face off with law enforcement officers near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • A man is injured after taking ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A man is injured after taking a projectile to the face from police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd Ð the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained Ð in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • A man is injured after taking ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A man is injured after taking a projectile to the face from police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Stanford Smith is helped after receiving ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Stanford Smith is helped after receiving pepper spray to the face during a protest after the killing of George Floyd Ð the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained Ð in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protestors line up against police during ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Protestors line up against police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Defying a city curfew order, protesters ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Defying a city curfew order, protesters created a makeshift barricade facing off with law enforcement officers near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • Police advance on people during a ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Police advance on people during a protest after the killing of George Floyd Ð the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained Ð in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protesters face off with law enforcement ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Protesters face off with law enforcement officers near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • Alex Woods stands with milk dried ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Alex Woods stands with milk dried to his face from a dousing after being pepper sprayed by police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • People begin to construct barriers to ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    People begin to construct barriers to stop the advancement of police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • A law enforcement officer sprays pepper ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    A law enforcement officer sprays pepper spray at demonstrators near Civic Center Park during a protest over the killing of George Floyd May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer.

  • A woman screams after receiving a ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A woman screams after receiving a point-blank shot of pepper spray from advancing police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • A Molotov cocktail burns out that ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    A Molotov cocktail that was thrown at Denver police officers burns out at 13th Avenue and Broadway. Officers massed while they were trying to fend off protesters during a protest in Denver on May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Men on motorcycles do burnouts as ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Men on motorcycles do burnouts as police advance during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Alexis Stepp holds a Black Lives ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    Alexis Stepp holds a Black Lives Matter Sign high as people run from the advancement of police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • People tag buildings as police advance ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    People tag buildings as police advance during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Vandalized kiosk sign at the Denver ...

    Andy Cross, The Denver Post

    Vandalized kiosk sign at the Denver Cultural Complex near 13th and Broadway during a George Floyd protest in Denver May 30, 2020. Protesters are outraged over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who was killed by a Minnesota police officer who pinned him to the ground with his knee on his neck.

  • Defying a curfew order, protesters face ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Defying a curfew order, protesters face off with law enforcement officers near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • Defying a curfew order, a group ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Defying a curfew order, a group of women hold their hands up in protest near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • A group pushes a dumpster down ...

    AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

    A group pushes a dumpster down a hill towards a line of police during a protest after the killing of George Floyd – the Minneapolis man, who was killed by an officer, while being detained – in downtown Denver on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Thousands gathered to protest as police enforced an 8 p.m. citywide curfew. As officers advanced, protestors began throwing objects as officers returned non-lethal fire into the crowd.

  • Protesters face off with law enforcement ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Protesters face off with law enforcement officers near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • Law enforcement officers detain people defying ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Law enforcement officers detain people defying a city curfew order in Capitol Hill in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

  • Dumpsters are tipped over in the ...

    Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

    Dumpsters are tipped over in the intersection of 14th Ave. and Pearl St. in Denver on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. It was the third night of protests in Denver with demonstrators outraged over the death of George Floyd this week at the hands of Minnesota police.

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Denver police arrested 284 people during 4 nights of George Floyd protests

Law enforcement officers have made 284 arrests on charges ranging from violation of the city’s emergency curfew order to arson in connection to the protests that have rocked Denver’s city core for four consecutive nights.

The number of people arrested each night has increased over time. Police made 170 arrests Sunday, more than the number of arrests in the previous three days combined.

The list of charges include violation of curfew order, assault, criminal mischief, assault to a peace officer, burglary and arson, according to a city news release.

Many of those arrested appeared Monday afternoon in Denver Municipal Court for their first advisement. Magistrate Melissa Annis set personal recognizance bonds for many of those arrested on curfew violations, which means the arrestees will be able to leave the jail without paying any money.

“If the curfew is in effect, the curfew is in effect,” Annis repeatedly told the defendants.

On Monday, Mayor Michael Hancock extended that curfew — originally only ordered for Saturday and Sunday nights — through Friday morning, and adjusted the time. The curfew is now in effect an hour later, from 9 p.m. each night through 5 a.m. the following morning.

The demonstrations, sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota last week, are expected to continue Monday night.


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Delaware COVID-19 Strategic Response Fund awards $260K in grants

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06-01-20 Kona man charged on several offenses

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Juvenile Aid Section, Area II
Lieutenant Scott Kurashige
Phone: (808) 326-4646 ext.230
Report No. 20-041407

[See image gallery at www.hawaiipolice.com]

Media Release

Big Island detectives have charged a 61-year-old Kona man for several offenses stemming from reports of a domestic-related stabbing incident.

On Saturday (May 30), at approximately 4:40 p.m., Kona Patrol officers responded to a report of a stabbing at a Kailua-Kona residence. Upon arrival at the residence, officers made contact with an adult female who had reportedly been assaulted with an edged weapon by her spouse. The victim was treated for her injuries at Kona Community Hospital and was later released.

The suspect, identified as Ikhyun Chang was arrested at the scene. Detectives from Area II Juvenile Aid Section continued the investigation and after conferring with County Prosecutors charged Chang with Attempted Murder in the Second Degree, Terroristic Threatening in the First Degree, and Abuse of a Family or Household Member. His bail was set at $54,000.00. Chang remains in police custody at the Kealakehe Police Station, pending his initial court appearance at Kona District Court this morning, (June 1)

Police ask anyone with information about this case to contact Detective Brandon Mansur, via email at brandon.mansur@hawaiicounty.gov or via phone at (808) 326-4646 ext. 301.


Westminster Barracks//DUI-Motor Vehicle Crash//6-1-2020

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20B102445                                                            RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper M. Pacilio & Trooper Z. Van Valkenburgh STATION: Westminster Barracks                                                CONTACT#: 802-722-4600   DATE/TIME: 06/01/2020, at


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WATCH LIVE: Confederate Monument protest organizer to address vandalism, looting

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) On Monday, June 1, 2020, Le’Darius Hilliard will hold a press conference to address vandalism and looting that occurred last night following a protest of a confederate monument located in Birmingham’s Linn Park.

Hilliard serves as President of the Jefferson County Millennial Democrats, an activist organization with a long track record of standing up against injustices and wrongdoings in our community, including calling on former Mayor Bell to remove the monument during his tenure in office. Hilliard also led protests related to EJ Bradford’s murder and support of Birmingham’s minimum wage increase.

“I want to draw a clear distinction between the protest organized around the removal of the confederate monument, which has long been a symbol of hate and divisiveness in our city, and the acts of violence against our city that followed,” stated Le’Darius Hilliard. “We live in a city that’s over 70 percent black with elected black leaders, and destroying our home is unacceptable.”

The press conference will take place at Kelly Ingram Park, across from 16th Street Baptist Church.

Tune in right here at 5 p.m. for the Live stream.


ChristianaCare’s opens new Center for Women’s & Children’s Health

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Created 6/1/2020 per request


Electric vehicles could be as disruptive to oil industry as coronavirus, Suncor CEO says

Canada is the world's fourth-largest oil producer and the sector accounts for 10.6 per cent of the country's gross domestic product.


Man struck by vehicle while working on his truck in Scottsboro

SCOTTSBORO, Ala. – A man was airlifted to an area hospital after being struck by a vehicle on Hwy 72 in Scottsboro.

Scottsboro Police Department Public Information Officer Erik Dohring said a man was working on his truck in the 23,000 block of Hwy 72 when he was hit by another vehicle.

The man has not been identified at this time.

Scottsboro Police are investigating the incident.

We are working to gather more information.


Delaware State Museums reopening with self-guided tours

Delaware’s five state museums — the John Dickinson Plantation, the Old State House and the Johnson Victrola Museum in Dover, the Zwaanendael Museum in Lewes and the New Castle Court House Museum in New Castle — are reopening with self-guided tours that allow visitors to experience the history of the First State while continuing to take all recommended steps to safeguard public health.In accordance with the Phase I reopening plans issued by Gov. John Carney, [...]


Fishermen in Hawaii catch 220 pounds of tuna, donate it to health care workers

TAMPA (CNN) – A group of fishermen in Hawaii had a lucky day at sea and decided to use their catch to feed their local health care workers.

The group caught two yellowfin tuna totaling 220 pounds.

The fish was sent to a seafood distributor who cleaned, cooked, and prepared the tuna into more than 300 poke bowls.

The meals were then delivered to Honolulu’s Straub Medical Center and the Queen’s Medical Center.

The men said they were inspired to do good for their community after witnessing another local fisherman, 104-year-old Setsuo Todoroki, regularly catch fish he then donated to strangers in need.


Yes, it’s safe to bring your child to the emergency: Montreal Children’s Hospital

The Montreal Children's Hospital is assuring families that it's safe to bring children to the emergency department during the COVID-19 crisis.


1 new coronavirus case in Saskatchewan, 6 more recoveries

Of the 646 coronavirus cases in Saskatchewan, 47 are currently considered active.


LIVE: Civil Rights organizations to respond to violent protests, confederate monuments

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) The City of Birmingham has a rich history when it comes to protesting injustice and demanding civil rights.

The recent deaths of unarmed Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd have sparked rallies across the nation, including Birmingham. Hundreds of people showed up for a peaceful protest on May 31, but it turned violent later that night.

The Birmingham Foot Soldiers, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, The Birmingham Urban League, and The National Action Network will respond to the events that happened yesterday. Leaders plan to address the violent rally, the confederate monuments in Linn Park, the new curfew issued by Mayor Randall Woodfin, and how we as a city need to move forward.

The Birmingham Urban League, Inc. was founded in 1967 as an affiliate of the National Urban League. It is a community-based organization dedicated to empowering communities and changing lives in the areas of education, jobs, housing, and health.

The press conference will take place at the Confederate Monument in Linn Park.

Tune in right here at 4 p.m. for the Live stream.


06-01-20 Missing person: Aphill Manaky (aka Jack Kirachy)

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Criminal Investigation Section, Area I
Lieutenant Rio Amon-Wilkins
Phone: (808) 961-2252
Report No. 19-069252

[See image gallery at www.hawaiipolice.com]

Media Release

Hawaiʻi Island Police are renewing their request for the public’s assistance in locating a 29-year-old Hilo man who was reported missing.

Aphill Manaky, also known as Jack Kirachy, was reported missing on Hawai’i Island in August 2019. However, he had contact with the Honolulu Police Department in December 2019.

Manaky is described as being 5-feet-8-inches, about 200 pounds, dark complexion, brown hair, and brown eyes.

Manaky is believed to have no permanent address and maybe residing on Oahu or Hawaiʻi Island.

Police ask that anyone who may have any information about the whereabouts of Manaky to call Detective Frank Mohica at (808) 961-2375 or Frank.Mohica@hawaiicounty.gov or the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s non-emergency number at (808) 935-3311.

 


Doug Ford to ask Ontario legislature to extend state of emergency through June

The premier confirmed the news on Monday, but would not say when any further restrictions would set to be lifted.


Nova Scotia court ruling orders province to better protect endangered species

Justice Christa Brothers says in a ruling issued Friday there has been a "chronic and systemic failure" to take action required under the Endangered Species Act.


Surveillance video secured in Regis Korchinski-Paquet death investigation: Ontario’s police watchdog

"While the investigation is ongoing, the details of the interviews and the video footage will not be released in an effort to ensure the memories of other potential witnesses are not tainted."


LIVE VIDEO: Protesters across the US for George Floyd

NOTE: At times this stream may contain graphic images and profanity.


California schools chief calls for new plan on racism, bias

California’s education chief Tony Thurmond announced plans Monday to lead a new effort focusing on racism in state schools during emotional remarks on George Floyd, whose killing he said has … Click to Continue »


Insurance Superintendent Says Even Mainers Outside of Flood Zones Should Consider Flood Insurance, Now.

With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicting more named storms, more hurricanes and more major hurricanes during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, Maine Insurance Superintendent Eric Cioppa strongly recommends that all Mainers consider purchasing flood insurance, even those who live outside of federally designated flood zones.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reports that in recent years hurricanes have caused above average flooding, with more than 40% of flood claims submitted from outside of high-risk flood areas between the years 2014 and 2018.

"No matter where we live, it's important that we all understand our flood risk, and what it could cost us," Cioppa said. "Dont wait until theres an imminent threat. Now is the time to call your agent to get a quote and purchase coverage. You can purchase a flood insurance policy at any time, but there is usually a 30-day waiting period for coverage to take effect."

Mortgage lenders generally require homes in flood zones to have flood coverage, but it is usually an optional purchase for all others. Many people assume incorrectly that their basic homeowners or renters insurance policy will cover damage from flooding, but flood coverage must almost always be purchased separately.

A homeowners or renters policy may pay for water damage inside a house, such as damage from an ice dam or a burst pipe, but it will usually not pay for unusual or rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters, such as those caused by snowmelt or torrential, soaking rain.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially runs between June 1 and November 30 each year.

Recommended related resources include:

Flood Insurance: Details are available from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) by calling 1-800-427-4661 or online at https://www.floodsmart.gov.

Inventory Checklist: A checklist can help establish an insurance claim. Start one at https://www.maine.gov/insurance/consumer/individuals_families/homeowners_renters/home_inventory_checklist.html and keep a hard copy in a secure location away from your home, with insurance policies, medical records, and other important documents.

Emergency Preparedness: For information about preparing yourself and family for emergency situations, such as floods, storms, power outages and home fires, visit https://www.ready.gov/ The Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) provides Maine specific information at https://www.maine.gov/mema/maine-prepares/.

Consumers with questions about insurance matters can obtain information and assistance from the Maine Bureau of Insurance by visiting maine.gov/insurance, calling 800-300-5000 (TTY 711), or e-mailing Insurance.PFR@maine.gov


Large crowd gathers in Moncton to protest racial injustice

A large crowd of anti-racism protesters gathered in front of Moncton City Hall on Monday.


The Latest: New York City imposing 11 p.m. curfew

The Latest on the death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck: ___ … Click to Continue »


Calgarians fill streets in 2nd protest in wake of George Floyd’s death

More than 1,500 protesters could be heard asking for change on Monday, chanting the words, "say his name" and "Black lives matter." 


Traffic Alert/Shrewsbury

Vt Route 103 is closed in the area of John C. Stewart and Sons in Shrewsbury for a motor vehicle accident.   This incident is expected to last for until further notice. Specific details are not yet available and updates will be provided as appropriate. Traffic is being diverted in the immediate area.      Motorists should expect delays in the area, or seek alternate routes.


Delaware National Guard checks thousands for COVID-19

Testing times and sites are posted on the state's website:https://coronavirus.delaware.gov/testing/


Trudeau says ‘we all have a role’ in confronting racism amid George Floyd solidarity protests

"There's a lot of work that remains to be done:" Trudeau on racism, George Floyd solidarity protests.


Two charged with robbery at Decatur gas station

DECATUR, Ala. – Two men are facing robbery charges for a robbery at a Decatur gas station last week.

Larri Jonealius Brown, 21, and Wjon Joe’l Leach, 19, were arrested Saturday on first-degree robbery charges.

Brown and Leach are accused of robbing someone May 25 at the Busy Bee Gas Station on 19th Avenue SE.

Decatur police said the victim told them he was robbed at gunpoint by two suspects and hit in the head with a handgun. Police said they were able to get a vehicle description and found it Saturday, with Leach driving it.

Brown was arrested separately later the same day, police said.

Leach’s bond was set at $30,000. Brown’s was set at $50,000.


The New Reality: Fitness studios prepare to re-open as COVID-19 restrictions ease

With physical distancing rules, gym-goers can expect to see reduced class sizes and increased cleaning.


Here’s what California state workers can expect if they’re picked for coronavirus assignments

Managers in California state departments have supplied lists of their workers to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration for contact tracing assignments. The assignments involve calling, texting and emailing people who have … Click to Continue »


SpaceX captures the flag, beating Boeing in cosmic contest

The first astronauts launched by SpaceX declared victory Monday in NASA’s cosmic capture-the-flag game. They quickly claimed the prize left behind at the International Space Station nearly a decade ago … Click to Continue »


RE: I 91 Down to 1 Lane.

Interstate has opened up fully. Normal operations.   From: Zavorotny, Ryan Sent: Monday, June 1, 2020 1:09 PM To: DPS - Roadway Alert ; DPS - B1 Disp Subject: I 91 Down to 1 Lane.   State of Vermont   Department of Public Safety   Vermont State Police   Westminster Barracks     Press Release – Highway /


1st-degree murder conviction upheld for Calgary man in swarming death

The Court of Appeal found that the trial judge, Court of Queen's Bench Justice William Tilleman, did not make an error in his verdict.


Family-ordered autopsy: Floyd died of asphyxia

MINNEAPOLIS — An autopsy commissioned for George Floyd’s family found that Floyd died of asphyxiation due to neck and back compression when a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for several minutes and ignored his cries of distress, the Floyd family’s attorneys said Monday.

The autopsy by a doctor who also examined Eric Garner’s body found the compression cut off blood to Floyd’s brain, and weight on his back made it hard to breathe.

The family’s autopsy differs from the official autopsy as described in a criminal complaint against the officer.

That autopsy included the effects of being restrained, along with underlying health issues and potential intoxicants in Floyd’s system, but also said it found nothing “to support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.”

Floyd, a black man who was in handcuffs at the time, died after the white officer ignored bystander shouts to get off him and Floyd’s cries that he couldn’t breathe.

His death, captured on citizen video, sparked days of protests in Minneapolis that have spread to cities around America.


The Latest: Family-ordered autopsy: Floyd died of asphyxia

The Latest on the death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck: ___ … Click to Continue »


LA has seen racial uprisings, many not shocked by new round

When violent protests over the death of George Floyd, a black man pinned down by a white Minneapolis officer, reached Los Angeles, people of color expressed heartbreak but not necessarily … Click to Continue »


‘Breeding grounds for this virus’: Health experts warn large protests heighten risk of coronavirus spread

Public health officials warn new cases of COVID-19 probably will emerge after mass gatherings fueled by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and racial unrest in cities across America.Health experts fear carriers of [...]


Children’s Water Festival

This annual event brings together fourth-grade students from around the region to learn about the vital role water plays in our lives.


Highway 231 bridge construction begins

MORGAN COUNTY, Ala. – Monday morning contractors began drilling the first of 32 shafts that will support the new bridges on Highway 231 on Brindlee Mountain.

Work will continue around the clock seven days a week until the twin bridges that span a landslide area on the side of the mountain are complete, the Alabama Department of Transportation said.

The $14.6 million project will put two bridges over about 1,000 feet of the mountainside that has been cleared away. The area experienced a landslide in February during heavy rains that caused the road to crack open.

The new bridges each will be about 44 feet wide, with two 12-foot lanes and 10-foot shoulders.

The contractor working on the project has until Dec. 2 to get the work done without penalties. ALDOT has incentives in place for the project to be completed sooner.


Thousands expected to participate in anti-racism demonstration in Halifax

The demonstration is scheduled to begin at 7:45 p.m. Organizers are asking participants to adhere to social distancing protocols and wear face masks.


Watch live: Gov. Gavin Newsom holds press conference after weekend of protests and vandalism

Newsom livestream embed 01 06 20 Gov. Gavin Newsom will hold a press conference Monday in Sacramento after a weekend of protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd … Click to Continue »


Transit pass agreements terminated for this fall by City of Kingston, Queen’s and St. Lawrence

A deal between the Cty of Kingston, Queen's University and St. Lawrence College that sees students receive Kingston Transit passes has been terminated for the upcoming school year.


No 90° Days In May: What The World Looked Like Last Time That Happened

Typically, May is the month Huntsville marks it’s first day at 90°. Some years we hit 90° earlier, but at least in recent years, it’s been fairly rare to enter the month of June without a 90° day.

Some data on when we have historically hit 90° in Huntsville

We’ve done that this year though! While Muscle Shoals was able to hit 91° on May 25th, Huntsville was only able to 88° on May 24th and 25th. The reason? A couple of cut off upper lows in the Central and Eastern U.S. that helped keep things cooler, cloudier, and rainier than normal through the second half of the month. The last time this happened was 2003, when George W. Bush was President, the biggest movie of the year was Lord Of The Rings: Return Of The King, and Everybody Loves Raymond was still on TV! I suspect it won’t take us too much longer before we hit 90°. The absolute latest it’s taken to hit 90° in Huntsville since 1970 is June 25, and the pattern we’re in could support a 90° day as early as this week.

Download Live Alert 19 for iOS or Android.

– Alex Puckett
Follow me on Twitter and Facebook


Derby Barracks / Larceny (request for information)

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A501946 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Pohlman                              STATION: Derby                      CONTACT#: 334-8881   DATE/TIME: Between 5/25/2020 and 6/1/2020 INCIDENT LOCATION: Chapdelaine Road, Brownington VIOLATION: Larceny      


Coronavirus: Families file class-action lawsuit against Altamont nursing home

The families of elderly residents who died after contacting COVID-19 at the Altamont Care Community filed a $20-million case against the facility on Monday.


Storm Water Management Program

Here you can find a list of the major elements of the Storm Water Management Program.


Bombardier exits commercial jet sector with CRJ aircraft series sale

The sale of its CRJ aircraft series paves the way for Bombardier to focus on its one remaining income stream: private jets.


Toronto mayor says Ottawa’s rushed funding for municipalities is a good ‘down payment’

"That's better than not doing anything, but it's not what we need," Toronto Mayor John Tory said.


Vermont State Police – Watch Commander schedule, June 1-7

  STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   Watch Commander Schedule for the week of: June 1-7.   Please follow the attached instructions for contacting the Watch Commanders.   Watch Commander – North Capt. Lance Burnham lance.burnham@vermont.gov     Watch Commander – South Capt. Mike Manley michael.manley@vermont.gov       Watch Commander –


Video shows trapped thieves breaking out of California store

People stealing from a Southern California clothing shop amid widespread unrest became trapped inside as police gathered outside the mostly boarded-up store front. Video aired by KABC-TV in Los Angeles … Click to Continue »


Environmental Management

As guardians of public health, we are devoted to protecting and preserving our region’s water resources; accomplished through community education and outreach as part of the Division’s primary initiatives.


‘Physically distance from your phone while driving’: SGI

SGI wants drivers to physically distance themselves from their phones while driving or face hefty fines.


One Vehicle Fatal Rollover Crash in San Miguel County

San Miguel County- On May 30, 2020 at about 9:36 a.m., the New Mexico State Police investigated a one vehicle fatal rollover crash on Interstate 25 near milepost 322, by Villanueva, NM.

The initial investigation indicated a 2002 Acura passenger car, driven by Syliva R. Sieland (58) of Santa Fe, NM was traveling north on Interstate 25. For unknown reasons the vehicle left the roadway and rolled. The driver, Sieland sustained fatal injuries in the crash and she was pronounced deceased on scene by the Office of Medical Investigator.

Alcohol does not appear to be a factor in the crash and seatbelts appear to have been properly utilized. No additional information is available.


###


Hong Kong’s national security law must follow common law, former chief justice says

Beijing’s proposed national security law for Hong Kong must conform to common law principles such as a restricted scope of offences, open trials and the presumption of innocence, the city’s first post-handover chief justice says.In a commentary published in the Post on Tuesday, Andrew Li Kwok-nang said barring foreign judges from presiding over national security trials would be detrimental to the judicial independence guaranteed by the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution.The National…


Vehicle accident on Atlanta Hwy in front of Target. Eastbound lane shut down.

Vehicle accident on Atlanta Hwy in front of Target. Eastbound lane shut down only.


China-enacted national security law must be consistent with Hong Kong legal principles

Under Article 23 of the Basic Law, the Hong Kong special administrative region has a constitutional duty to enact national security legislation covering seven areas. In the last 23 years, we have failed to do so. Only one attempt has been made. Further, there is no prospect of Hong Kong doing so for many years to come. It cannot be said with any confidence that we will be able to do so before 2047.

In these circumstances and with regard to events in Hong Kong in the last few years, the…


Remembering Legendary Auburn Coach Pat Dye

Pat Dye, one of the most beloved Auburn football coaches, has died at the age of 80.

Pat Dye’s football journey started in Georgia. He was an All-American football player at Richmond Academy in Augusta and led them to the Class 3A State Championship in 1956. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution selected Dye as Georgia’s 3A Lineman of the Year of 1956.

Dye went to play college football for the Georgia Bulldogs where he played offensive guard and linebacker. He continued to find success on the grid iron winning multiple individual awards including SEC Lineman of the Year and was a two-time William K. Jenkins Award for the Outstanding Georgia Lineman. Dye helped the Dawgs win the SEC Championship and win the Orange Bowl in 1959.

After graduating from Athens, Dye spent three years playing in the Canadian Football League. He served his country in the US Army from 1963-1964.

He then started his coaching career in 1965 as the linebackers for the University of Alabama. He spent 8 years in Tuscaloosa as a assistant coach then earned his first head coaching position at East Carolina.

Dye spent 19 seasons as a head coach but he is mostly known for the 12 seasons leading the Auburn Tigers from 1981-1992. During his time on the plains Coach Dye led the Tigers to four SEC titles. He won one a 1983 and a 3-peat of SEC Titles from 1987-89. Coach Dye’s Tigers finished the season ranked in the Associated Press Top-20 eight times, and Auburn had five top-10 finishes.

He also was a three-time SEC Coach of the Year (1983, 1987, 1988).  Coach Dye was also inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005. Even while Coach Dye was leading the Auburn Football team he was also the Auburn University Athletic Director from 1981-1991.

Coach Dye stepped down as Auburn’s athletic director in 1991. One year later he stepped down as the Tigers head coach after a 5-5-1 record in 1992. His final record as a coach at Auburn was 99-39-4.

David Housel, former AU Athletic Director released a statement following the news of the legendary coach’s passing:

People will talk about all the games he won, the championships and bowl games, but his greatest contribution, his legacy, is the difference he made in the lives of the people who played for him and worked with him.  I am one of them.  He made a difference in my life.

He came to Auburn at a time when Auburn needed leadership and focus.  He provided that leadership and focus.  Auburn will be forever better because of him.

David Housel


Wilmington man dies in Dover collision

The man was driving a motorcycle that collided with a sports-utility vehicle on Bayside Drive (Route 9), Delaware State Police said.


Body cam video released in lawsuit accusing Merced police officers of excessive force

The attorney for a man who has filed a federal civil suit accusing Merced police of excessive force has released body camera footage of the altercation between his client and … Click to Continue »


Artist with autism makes balloon sculptures to thank essential workers

(CNN) — The coronavirus pandemic has spurred an outpouring of gratitude for frontline workers. One New Jersey man is using his “ausome” talent to dish out balloons filled with joy.

22-year-old Eddie Lin is a balloon artist with autism who makes elaborate sculptures to honor essential workers. His work has caught the attention of people across the country.

“I think it gives people inspiration to see that even someone who has special needs knows the word ‘appreciation’ and shows gratitude in his own special way,” said his mother, Jenny Lin.

Eddie, who goes by the name “Ausome Balloon Creator,” was diagnosed with autism at the age of 3. By the time he was 10, he’d taught himself how to make impressive balloon sculptures using YouTube tutorials. He has since turned that hobby into a lucrative business.

An affinity for ‘heroes’

Eddie has a fondness of superheroes; Marvel superheroes, to be exact. But to him, there are plenty of heroes without capes.

“In his head, people who go above and beyond, those are heroes,” his mother said in an interview with CNN. The family lives in Edison.

“He goes to the doctor’s office and everybody who helps him, he calls them all ‘doctors,'” she explained.

Even the family housekeeper gets a bouquet of balloon flowers when she makes his bed.

Eddie’s first sculpture for an essential worker went out to his friend’s mother, whom he was trying to cheer up. On a FaceTime call, Kay Mastrocola mentioned her mom was stressed out in her role as a manager at their local grocery store.

“She says, ‘Eddie, what do you think you could do to cheer my mom up?'” explained Lin. “Eddie did exactly what he’s good at.”

He made a shopping cart with the simple message that said, “Thank you.”

A simple gesture, powerful meaning

The gesture made its way to social media, and from there, Eddie’s thank you campaign took off.

He now has made balloon sculptures for mail carriers…

Health care workers…

And police officers.

Eddie’s small business initially focused on making balloon art for special events, such as birthdays on the weekend. Now, he is flooded with paid requests to create similar appreciative gestures throughout the week. Some can take up to 10 minutes to make.

“Balloons just give people that sense of joy and happiness,” said Jenny Lin.

“It’s especially important at this time to show our appreciation to the people who sacrifice their family time, and put themselves in danger just to provide for us,” she went on to say.

Eddie works part time at the local library, and his mother says balloon art has helped him connect with people despite his autism.

“It definitely helps him, the sense of talking to people. It also boosts his self-esteem,” said his mother.

“It’s something he is good at, and he is proud of it.”

She hopes that seeing his story will inspire others to be kind and express gratitude.

“These people wouldn’t do their jobs any differently with or without the thank you,” she said.

“But, it’s human nature to want to feel appreciated.”


Gilles Peterson: Woman guilty of stalking BBC radio DJ

Sarah Rook hurled racist abuse at the BBC DJ and his wife at home and at work.


University of Waterloo researchers using social media to predict disease outbreaks

Researchers at the University of Waterloo are using social media in an attempt to forecast when we may see future outbreaks of diseases like COVID-19 and measles.


Decatur Fire and Rescue responding to two different fires in the city

DECATUR, Ala. – Crews are responding to two different fires in the City of Decatur.

Decatur Fire and Rescue confirmed four trucks are responding to a house fire on Aldingham Drive SW and two more are responding to an industrial fire on State Docks Road.

Decatur Fire and Rescue said to pull over when any emergency vehicle approaches.


Inslee issues guidance for higher education and workforce training in Phases 1 and 2

Gov. Jay Inslee today issued higher education and workforce training requirements in Phase 1 and Phase 2.

These guidelines do not apply generally to higher education institutions; they apply only to workforce training programs that require in-classroom/lab practicums only.


Former Stampeder Jon Cornish never experienced racism in Calgary ‘until last week’

Speaking candidly about racism, Cornish said, “it is here. It’s not like this is some issue that’s far away.”


PFAS and Drinking Water

Info About PFAS and Drinking Water


Huntsville police chief calls George Floyd’s death “intolerable and inexcusable”

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Huntsville Police Chief Mark McMurray said Monday that the arrest and death of George Floyd last week “is heart-wrenching and angers police leaders across the country.”

Floyd died in the custody of Minneapolis police last week; an officer was recorded on video with his knee on Floyd’s neck for several minutes before paramedics arrived. In a statement released Monday by the Huntsville police department, McMurray said he had been in contact with HPD employees, Mayor Tommy Battle’s Office and Huntsville City Council “emphasizing the intolerable and inexcusable in-custody death of George Floyd.”

McMurray said the actions of the officers in the video are not how Huntsville police trains its officers.

“The training we conduct reflects the role and responsibility of an officer to protect and safeguard suspects in custody as well as the public,” McMurray said. “This is paramount to what we do. We have no training that equates to the total disregard for life that was displayed in that video.”

In regard to protesting in Huntsville, McMurray said the department respects citizens’ right to protest peacefully “and we will be there to support and protect you as we give voice to our human rights as citizens of this great community and nation.”

McMurray’s complete statement is below:

“The misconduct of a few officers several hundred miles away has once again brought national attention and doubt on the profession of law enforcement.

I have spent this last week in communication with Huntsville Police Department employees, the Mayor’s Office and our City Council Members emphasizing the intolerable and inexcusable in-custody death of George Floyd. The video is heart-wrenching and angers police leaders across the country. HPD extends our deepest condolences to the Floyd family.

The techniques I observed in that video are not how HPD trains officers. The training we conduct reflects the role and responsibility of an officer to protect and safeguard suspects in custody as well as the public. This is paramount to what we do. We have no training that equates to the total disregard for life that was displayed in that video.

We recognize the pain and concern this incident has brought to our community. As your Chief of Police, we respect your right to protest peacefully and we will be there to support and protect you as we give voice to our human rights as citizens of this great community and nation.”


I 91 Down to 1 Lane.

State of Vermont   Department of Public Safety   Vermont State Police   Westminster Barracks     Press Release – Highway / Traffic Notification     Interstate 91 SB has been reduced to one lane between exits 6 & 5 due to a motor vehicle accident.    This incident is expected to last for until further notice. Specific details are not yet available and updates will be


New case of novel coronavirus identified in Kingston region

The Kingston region once again has one active case of the novel coronavirus.


Florence police searching for missing girl

FLORENCE, Ala. – Florence police are asking for the public’s help in finding a runaway 14-year-old girl.

Victoria Rose McDonald was last seen in Florence Sunday, police said.

McDonald is 5 feet 2 inches tall and 110 pounds with black hair and brown eyes.

Anyone with information about McDonald’s location is asked to contact the Florence Police Department at 256-760-6610. They also can text a tip to 274637 using keyword FPDTIP with a message.


After postponing, Bolder Boulder decides to officially cancel 2020 race

Citing ongoing concerns over COVID-19 and uncertainty over when it will be safe for runners to gather in large crowds, officials of the Bolder Boulder have scrapped plans to run the postponed race on Labor Day and canceled it for this year.

“It’s the most difficult decision we have ever had to make,” said race director Cliff Bosley. “At the core of the decision is the health and safety of our participants and the community. That’s paramount.”

On March 16, race officials announced a postponement of the annual Memorial Day race. Ten days later, they said they would try to run the race on Labor Day. But now they have decided that that is not feasible.

“In the eleven or twelve weeks that have passed, there are still a lot of unknowns that really have health and safety implications,” Bosley said. “The state is still under orders for no gatherings larger than 10 people. The closer we get to Labor Day, the more that landscape makes it difficult to consider staging the race.”

The Bolder Boulder, which dates back to 1979, typically attracts about 45,000 runners, ranking it as the fourth-largest running race in the United States. More than 14,000 runners were already signed up for this year’s race when Bosley suspended registration in March. Those runners are now automatically re-registered for next year’s race at no additional cost and will receive their race packets through the mail, including whatever shirt package they selected.

They also have the option of deferring their registration to 2022 or beyond.

About 14,500 people in the U.S. as well as in 21 other countries signed up to run the Bolder Boulder virtually last week, Bosley said, with nearly 600 of them running on the streets of Boulder on Memorial Day. Some residents with homes along the race course kept their Memorial Day rituals intact, making signs and keeping water hoses at the ready. Some ran as families, and many of the runners ran all the way up the steep climb to the entryway to Folsom Field — the traditional finish of the race — and posed for pictures at a locked gate there.

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Hancock will extend Denver’s emergency curfew through Monday night

For the third night in a row, Denver will have an emergency 8 p.m. curfew as leaders expect additional marches Monday night, Mayor Michael Hancock told Colorado Public Radio.

Hancock initially put the 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew in place Saturday and Sunday as thousands ramped up their protest of the death of George Floyd, a black man killed by a Minneapolis police officer last week. Protests began Thursday night and almost immediately turned violent with police across the country — including in Denver — spraying crowds with pepper balls, pepper spray and foam bullets, among other things.

Organizers are planning another march on the Capitol at 5 p.m. Monday, according to a Facebook event listing.

A total of 83 people were arrested Saturday night for violating Hancock’s curfew. Much of Denver’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, including the state Capitol and the City and County Building, suffered spray paint and window damage.

The protests Sunday offered much of the same. Protesters and journalists alike have been injured by pepper spray and other projectiles fired from police as well.

In addition, three Denver police officers and a person they were taking into custody were injured in a hit-and-run crash Saturday night.

As the protests boiled over in Denver, Hancock has taken to social media multiple times to call for activists to remain peaceful and to go home once the curfew hit.


Places of worship in Saskatchewan prepare for Phase 3 of province’s reopen plan

Things will look a little bit different as places of worship begin to welcome back members when Phase 3 of Saskatchewan's reopen plans takes effect on June 8.


Traffic Incident

201 State Street
The MPD is investigating a hit-and-run crash after a car struck the Overture Center, 201 State Street, Friday night. Overture sustained façade & #8230;


Hickenlooper subpoenaed to testify Thursday about private flights

Colorado’s Independent Ethics Commission voted Monday to subpoena U.S. Senate candidate John Hickenlooper, a move that will force him to testify Thursday about private jet trips he took as governor.

The five-person commission voted unanimously at a special meeting to issue the subpoena, rejecting the arguments of Mark Grueskin, Hickenlooper’s attorney, who said a virtual hearing in the case would violate his client’s due process rights.

“If we didn’t have all the problems we have in the world right now, I would prefer an in-person hearing,” said Commissioner William Leone. “Who wouldn’t? It is a preferable format. But I don’t have any confidence at this point that the parties will ever be able to agree on a time or a procedure for an in-person hearing.”

Before the vote, Grueskin issued a legal threat to commissioners, saying twice that he will likely try to quash the subpoena in Denver District Court. It’s unclear if Grueskin’s legal action would further delay Thursday’s long-awaited hearing.

Hickenlooper stands accused of violating the Colorado Constitution’s ban on gifts when he accepted private jet flights from wealthy friends and businesses as governor. He has maintained his innocence and accused the Public Trust Institute, which filed the ethics complaint, of playing politics with Colorado ethics laws.

Melissa Miller, a spokeswoman for the Hickenlooper campaign, called Monday’s subpoena “ridiculous.” She said Hickenlooper has agreed repeatedly to testify in person and noted that PTI agreed in April that a virtual hearing violates due process.

Grueskin had suggested that a hearing in the 18-month-old case occur in person in mid-August. The commission agreed to hold the hearing then if both sides agreed, but PTI did not. Before voting to subpoena Hickenlooper, commissioners voiced exasperation Monday that the two sides have failed to come to an agreement.

“I feel the parties have been engaged in some gamesmanship here with respect to this hearing,” Leone said. “One day, the commission is accused of delaying the hearing; the next day, the same party asks for a continuance in the hearing.”

Hickenlooper will face Andrew Romanoff in a Democratic primary June 30. The winner will take on Sen. Cory Gardner, a Yuma Republican, in early November.


Trans Mountain reaches ‘key milestone’ as pipeline construction begins in B.C.

Construction on a seven-kilometre section of the Trans Mountain pipeline has begun in Kamloops.


Coronavirus: Government urged to change advice to ‘stay local’

Coastal areas have been overrun by tourists since travel limits were lifted, the government is told.


Watch looters attack Amazon delivery van in Santa Monica

Looters targeted downtown stores during protests against police violence in Santa Monica, California, on May 31, 2020, following the death of George Floyd
This video shows a group of people breaking into an Amazon van in Santa Monica and stealing. … Click to Continue »


Frontier requiring temperature checks for passengers, crew before boarding

DENVER (WJW) —Frontier Airlines will now conduct temperature screenings for all passengers and crew members before boarding flights.

According to the airline, this decision was made in effort to prevent further spread of the coronavirus, which was declared a global pandemic in March.

The virus, COVID-19, is known to cause mild to severe respiratory illness and spreads via person-to-person transmission, primarily from respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can be deposited in the mouth, nose, or eyes of nearby people or be inhaled into the lungs. Asymptomatic persons can transmit the virus.

Frontier says that beginning Monday anyone with a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher will not be permitted to travel. The airline also requires face coverings for all passengers and crew, which must be worn throughout the entire flight.

“Temperature screenings are the latest addition to our comprehensive, multi-layered approach to supporting the health and well-being of everyone onboard our aircraft,” Frontier Airlines CEO Barry Biffle said in a press release. “Combined with face coverings, hospital-grade HEPA air filtration and enhanced cleaning and disinfection procedures, we believe our aircraft are safer than any other mode of transportation.”

Customers will be screened via touchless thermometers prior to boarding.

If a customer’s temperature reading is 100.4 degrees or higher, and time allows, they will be given the opportunity to rest before receiving a second check. If the second temperature screening is 100.4 degrees or higher, a Frontier gate agent will explain to the customer that they will not be flying that day for the health and safety of others.

The airline says they will work with that customer to rebook travel on a later date or otherwise accommodate the traveler’s preferences with respect to their reservation.

All crew members will undergo this process as well and be held to the same standards as customers.

In April, Frontier also updated its boarding procedures to board most passengers from the rear of the aircraft to the front.

Frontier also announced at that time that passengers will take a health acknowledgment prior to completing check-in via the company’s website or mobile app. Passengers are required to confirm that:

  • They nor anyone in their household has exhibited COVID-19 related symptoms in the last 14 days
  • They will check their temperature before heading to the airport and not travel if they have a fever
  • They will wash their hands/sanitize before boarding the flight
  • They understand and acknowledge the airline’s face covering and temperature screening policies

The airline, like numerous other air carriers, is also increased its “already stringent” aircraft cleaning and sanitation protocols.


Robbery

301 North Hamilton St.
A man claiming to be armed with a weapon robbed Pinkus McBride Market, 301 N. Hamilton St., Saturday night. He made off with some of the store's & #8230;


Ontario ombudsman launches long-term care investigation following military report

Ontario's ombudsman is launching an investigation into the province's oversight of long-term care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Minneapolis is trying to recover after days of George Floyd protests – one bag of garbage and one food donation at a time

MINNEAPOLIS — At the end of a week that roiled this city of 400,000, there were people carrying brooms and garbage bags on a sunny Sunday.Jack Manderscheid, a University of Minnesota senior, exemplified the spirit of the day by meticulously walking through the Uptown neighborhood filling up four trash bags that he carried on his bicycle."I’ve never really seen a community come together," said Manderscheid, a native of suburban Edina who woke up Sunday [...]


Robbery

855 E. Johnson St.
A man entered Cork n' Bottle, 855 E. Johnson St., Sunday afternoon claiming to be armed. He demanded money, threatened to harm an employee, and & #8230;


A busy hurricane season and the coronavirus pandemic ‘is a cataclysmic scenario’

Thanks to COVID-19, the hurricane season that officially starts Monday will be unlike any other. "The combination of an ongoing pandemic and what NOAA has forecast to be a busy hurricane season is a cataclysmic scenario," according to the disaster policy group SmarterSafer Coalition.Federal forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration last [...]


Severn Trent: ‘High demand’ leaves thousands without water

Severn Trent urges customers to reduce water use to ensure an adequate supply for hand washing.


Robbery

2930 N. Sherman Ave.
 A 47-year-old Madison woman was mugged while walking on a Warner Park bike path Sunday afternoon. She told police a man wrapped his arms & #8230;


Coronavirus in Colorado, June 1: A look at the latest updates on COVID-19

On Sunday, state health officials for the second straight day announced no new fatalities tied directly to COVID-19 and only two additional deaths of people who had contracted the virus, though there’s a lag in reporting deaths to the state health department — particularly death-certificate data.

Take a look inside a Colorado hospital’s COVID-19 unit, a quiet fight to keep coronavirus patients breathing.

Throughout the day, we will share the latest coverage from Denver Post journalists on the coronavirus outbreak on this page. Also, bear in mind The Denver Post relies on support from its readers to provide this in-depth coverage of the coronavirus outbreak, so please consider buying a subscription if you haven’t already.

What’s new

Resources


The numbers


Live blog

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


‘An old neighborhood again’: What New Orleans’ French Quarter has been like without tourists

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — For Jack Greenwood, New Orleans’ COVID-19 lockdowns brought sadness, but also a revelation: He was making more acquaintances with fellow residents — people he might not have noticed before tourism dried up in the French Quarter."I’ve seen and met more [...]


Coronavirus: Latest developments in the Greater Toronto Area on June 1

Here is a roundup of the latest developments on the novel coronavirus pandemic in the Greater Toronto Area for Monday, June 1, 2020.


Military eyeing possibility that bird strike caused deadly Snowbirds crash

Capt. Jennifer Casey died after ejecting from the Snowbirds aircraft last month.


George Floyd. Ahmaud Arbery. Breonna Taylor. What do we tell our children?

Should we tell the children? How?Those are among the many questions parents are asking after the recent deaths of George Floyd, [...]


Violence-stricken US cities clean up, brace for more unrest

A country convulsed by violent protests picked up the pieces Monday morning and braced for more trouble amid a coast-to-coast outpouring of rage over police killings of black people. President … Click to Continue »


Gov. Ivey says Alabama National Guard on standby following weekend protests

MONTOGOMERY, Ala. – Governor Kay Ivey announced that she has given authorization to Adjutant General Sheryl Gordon with the Alabama National Guard to activate up to 1000 guardsmen. If a need arises in response to violent protesters. 

The governor’s office says this action strictly serves as a preparedness measure, should local and state law enforcement need additional support. 

Governor Ivey released the following statement:

“While there is no immediate need for us to deploy our Guard, I have given authorization to Adjutant General Sheryl Gordon to be on standby, should our local and state law enforcement need additional support. 

“The Alabama National Guard stands ready to assist when peaceful protests become violent and dangerous to our public safety. I will always support the right of the people of Alabama to peacefully lift your voices in anger and frustration. However, we will not allow our cities to become a target for those, especially from other states, who choose to use violence and destruction to make their point.”

Governor Kay Ivey


16 COVID-19 Cases Reported in Lincoln Today

Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird and the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) announced that16 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Lincoln today, bringing the community total to 1,228.

Visit COVID19.lincoln.ne.gov to access a dashboard that summarizes Lancaster County COVID-19 data.


President Trump slams governors as ‘weak,’ urges crackdown on protests

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Monday derided the nation’s governors as “weak” and demanded tougher crackdowns on protesters in the aftermath of another night of violent protests in dozens of American cities.

Trump spoke to governors on a video teleconference with law enforcement and national security officials, telling the local leaders they “have to get much tougher” amid nationwide protests and criticizing their responses.

“Most of you are weak,” Trump said. “You have to arrest people.”

The days of protests were triggered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after he was pinned at the neck by a white Minneapolis police officer. They turned violent in several cities, with looting and mayhem, and fires ignited in the historic park across from the White House.

The president urged the governors to deploy the National Guard, which he credited for helping calm the situation Sunday night in Minneapolis. He demanded that similarly tough measures be taken in cities that also experienced a spasm of violence, like New York, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

“You’ve got to arrest people, you have to track people, you have to put them in jail for 10 years and you’ll never see this stuff again,” said Trump. “We’re doing it in Washington, D.C. We’re going to do something that people haven’t seen before.”

The president told the governors they were making themselves “look like fools” for not calling up more of the National Guard as a show for force on city streets.

Attorney General Bill Barr, who was also on the call, told governors that a joint terrorist task force would be used to track the agitators and urged local officials to “dominate” the streets and control, not react to crowds, and urged them to “go after troublemakers.”

Trump’s angry exhortations at the nation’s governors came after a night of escalating violence, images of fires and looting and clashes with police filling the nation’s airwaves and overshadowing the largely peaceful protests. The protests grew so heated Friday night that the Secret Service rushed the president to an underground bunker previously used during terrorist attacks.

Trump continued his effort to project strength, using a series of inflammatory tweets and delivering partisan attacks during a time of national crisis.

As cities burned night after night and images of violence dominated television coverage, Trump’s advisers discussed the prospect of an Oval Office address in an attempt to ease tensions. The notion was quickly scrapped for lack of policy proposals and the president’s own seeming disinterest in delivering a message of unity.

Trump did not appear in public on Sunday and was not scheduled to so Monday either.


Derby Barracks / ATV Crash

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20A501918 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Aaron Leonard STATION: Derby CONTACT#: 802-334-8881   DATE/TIME: 05/30/2020 1228 hours STREET: Fish and Game Road TOWN: Derby WEATHER: Sunny ROAD CONDITIONS: Dry, Gravel   VEHICLE #1 OPERATOR: Larry Hitchcock Jr AGE: 50 CITY


Arrested Person

S. Gammon Rd.
The MPD pulled over a car last night on S. Gammon Rd., near the West Beltline Highway, after an officer noticed the license plate was covered in & #8230;


‘It’s the right thing to do’: People out cleaning up streets after weekend protests

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Following protests in Austin over the in-custody death of George Floyd, some people were up early Monday cleaning up the streets — literally.

Kia Yanna Monroe, one of the protesters, was out picking up trash along with others left behind in areas where protesters assembled.

“I’ve been watching people going live. I was here protesting on Saturday. And I just noticed that after the protest there’s a lot of garbage, a lot of bottles, a lot of stuff that’s on the ground. Just wanted to come out and clean up a little bit,” she said.

“I think it’s important. I understand why everybody’s out here. I’m part of it, but I also think our city needs to be cleaned too,” she said.

Monroe said it’s “just the right thing to do,” and that other people were out cleaning during the weekend.

“I just decided to do it today,” she said.

Monroe said all the violence and looting was hard to see since the protests are supposed to be peaceful.

“It was a little rough being down here cause some people are using the Black Lives Matter in a very negative way, trying to cause more commotion that it needs to be, she said. “It’s supposed to be peaceful protests, and some people turning it into making it become violent which is not the answer.”

Everybody, especially police, she said, needs to sit down and talk about how to move forward.

“Clearly, conversation needs to be had,” she said. “Everybody needs to listen to each other, especially the cops. They way they’re handling it now, I don’t think is the right way cause you are shooting at us, macing us. You are tear-gassing us when all we’re trying to do is peacefully protest and wanting somebody to listen to us.”






3 arrests in shooting at Oakland police headquarters

About 60 people were arrested in Oakland, including three people detained Monday on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon on peace officers. The three allegedly shot at the department’s … Click to Continue »


Kingston to reinstate certain hourly parking fees previously lifted due to coronavirus pandemic

The city says certain downtown streets and lots will begin charging parking fees starting June 8.


Ottawa speeding rollout of billions in funding for cash-strapped cities amid coronavirus

Municipalities have seen steep losses in revenues through the coronavirus pandemic.


Record 401,900 Hongkongers sign up to vote following opposition campaign to win seats in September’s Legislative Council election

A record 401,900 Hongkongers have signed up to vote in the past year following a campaign by opposition politicians, who are aiming to win more than half the seats being contested in September’s Legislative Council elections.The surge means there are more than 4.45 million registered voters in Hong Kong, according to the Registration and Electoral Office, which released its provisional register on Monday.The office arrived at the new tally, which represents a net increase of 322,400, after…


Coronavirus: Mississauga reopens some park amenities, off-leash zones

“We encourage residents to continue to stay local, stay apart and to use their common sense. If you arrive at a park and it is busy, please turn around and go home," Mayor Bonnie Crombie said.


Sexual Assault

7700 block Radcliffe Dr.
A 29-year-old Madison woman was punched and robbed during an attempted sexual assault in the 7700 block of Radcliffe Dr. Friday night. The & #8230;


It’s time to stand up’: Peaceful demonstrations, looting and chanting on sixth night of George Floyd protests

Protesters marched in the streets again Sunday across the U.S. to call for reforms after the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died in police custody on Memorial Day in Minneapolis.Most demonstrations, some attracting hundreds of people, were peaceful though violence, [...]


Tropical Storm Cristobal likely to form in Gulf of Mexico as hurricane season officially begins

NEW ORLEANS, La. (WGNO) — It’s the first day of the Atlantic Hurricane Season — and Mother Nature is wasting no time in reminding us that hurricane season has arrived.

There is growing confidence that Tropical Storm Cristobal will form in the Bay of Campeche/southern Gulf of Mexico by midweek.

The National Hurricane Center said a disturbance identified as Invest 93-L has an 80% chance of development within the next 48 hours as the remnants from Tropical Storm Amanda in the East Pacific cross Central America and move into the southern Gulf.

Officials in El Salvador said at least seven people have died in flooding from Amanda.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said newly formed Tropical Storm Amanda had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph when it came ashore Sunday, though it soon dissipated as it moved across Guatemala. Forecasters said it could dump 10 to 15 inches of rain in some areas.

In the short term, the system is expected to move little in the southern Gulf through Wednesday and Thursday.

However, by late week into the weekend, all of the Gulf Coast from Texas to Florida should keep a close eye on this disturbance for potential impacts late week into early next week.

Forecast models range in intensity from the system completely dying out over Mexico to reaching hurricane strength in the western Gulf. Do not focus on any one model run. The consensus is for a minimal to moderate tropical storm risk.

Ultimately, the biggest risks from an early season tropical system often include the heavy rainfall and flash flood risk along and East of where the system moves. Expect these rainfall totals to get modified as the overall setup becomes more clear.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


DUI with children in car

26-year-old Jarod C. Carter, of Smyrna, charged


Shaftsbury Barracks/ Burglary Arrest

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B300114 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Colin Shepley                              STATION: Shaftsbury Barracks                      CONTACT#: 802-442-5421   DATE/TIME: 01/10/2020 at 1221 hours. INCIDENT LOCATION: Timbertrail Road Shaftsbury, VT


Latino homes report serious COVID-19 symptoms nearly twice as often, survey of 1.6 million shows

In Wake Forest, North Carolina, a town of about 40,000 near Raleigh, a sweeping national survey of COVID-19 symptoms has exposed a staggering ethnic divide.Nearly two-thirds of Wake Forest’s Hispanic homes surveyed reported suffering the combination of symptoms most closely tied to the coronavirus, compared to less than 1% of everyone else.The survey by a marketing research company is believed to be the largest measurement of symptoms of the virus. Since March, 1. [...]


Their stores were burned, ransacked and looted. What’s next for Minneapolis-area small business owners in danger of losing livelihoods?

MINNEAPOLIS — Brandy Moore likened the charred remains of her south Minneapolis clothing store and recording studio to the pangs for equality that minorities here feel. Smoke continued to waft in the air 24 hours after people protesting the death of George Floyd lit fire to Moore's storefront, and several others along Lake Street. "My business burned down two days ago, you see the flames? It's still going," Moore, 41, said Sunday. [...]


James Anderson: Coronavirus break may add ‘a year or two’ to career

England's James Anderson believes the enforced break from cricket due to the coronavirus pandemic could prolong his career.


Green Line LRT: Calgary councillors meet Monday to discuss revised alignment of Stage 1

On Monday, councillors will begin hearing submissions from the public regarding the revised alignment.


Upper Thames River Conservation Authority outlines reopening plan amid COVID-19

Overnight or short-term camping will not be opening at this time.


May 29, 2020

Type of Analysis: 
Blood Alcohol Analysis
Drug Toxicology
Controlled Substances
Latent Prints
Backlogged Cases: 
28
587
125
14
Average Turnaround Time (days): 
27
73
32
24
Do Not Edit: 
Crime Lab Backlog Status For:
Body: 

The Crime Lab at the Arizona Department of Public Safety has released a status update regarding their backlogged cases. These cases are culminate from the four laboratories across the state: Tucson, Phoenix, Flagstaff and Lake Havasu. 


Highgate ‘widow’ swan has cygnets after finding lockdown love

The pair of swans met at a sanctuary in March while they were both recovering from injuries.


What is antifa and what does the movement want?

Antifa — short for "anti-fascist" — is the name for loosely affiliated, left-leaning anti-racist groups that monitor and track the activities of local neo-Nazis. The movement has no unified structure or national leadership but has emerged in the form of local bodies nationwide, particularly on the West Coast.Some of the groups, such as the 10-year-old Rose City Antifa in Portland, the oldest antifa group in the U.S., are [...]


Canadian Red Cross helping family of 5 after house fire in Belledune, N.B.

Volunteers with the Canadian Red Cross have now assisted two adults and three children with emergency purchases.


Governor Ivey responds to Birmingham Protests with statement

MONTGOMERY, Ala. – On Monday morning, Governor Kay Ivey issued a statement in response to the Birmingham protests.

Full Statement –

“Like so many others throughout the country and around the world, I, too, was shocked and angered by the tragic actions that led to the senseless death of George Floyd last week in Minneapolis. It is a death that should have never happened, and it is a tragedy for which that too many people, especially African Americans, are all too familiar. 

“Regretfully, the natural anger and frustration of Mr. Floyd’s death has now spread to our state and what started out as peaceful protests in some of our cities yesterday afternoon turned ugly last night. 

“While no state has a richer history than Alabama in terms of using peaceful protests to lead the country – and the world – to positive change, I agree with Alabama native, Congressman John Lewis, who this weekend said ‘rioting, looting and burning is not the way.’

“Congressman Lewis marched alongside other Alabamians who would go on to become heroes of the movement.  They were young, brave and determined.  Many were beaten, arrested and jailed.  But they all — Rosa Parks, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. Ralph David Abernathy, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, attorney and civil rights activist Fred Gray and others – led the fight for change in a peaceful way. 


“I will always support the right of the people of Alabama to peacefully lift your voices in anger and frustration. After all, our great country was born out of the desire to be free and the desire for freedom has repeatedly led to making positive change for the betterment of society.  


“However, we will not allow our cities to become a target for those, especially from other states, who choose to use violence and destruction to make their point. What I saw happen last night in Birmingham was unbecoming of all those who have worked to make Birmingham the great city it is.  Going forward, this cannot be tolerated. State assets are available to any local government that makes the request. We will show respect to ourselves and to each other through this process.”

Governor Kay Ivey


Colorful art installation takes over what used to be a weed-filled, dried-up pond in City Park

Sarah and Joshua Palmeri’s new “Color Field” installation comes across as the sort of pandemic-friendly art project we all need right now, an uplifting and unpretentious offering to the masses that’s just right for the troubled times.

The work, made of 6,000 painted, wooden dowels fashioned into abstract lily ponds, meets the moment with both joy and practicality. It’s set up outdoors, in a less-traveled section of City Park, so it can be viewed efficiently during these months when caution over person-to-person spread of the fledgling coronavirus has curtailed our ability to visit indoor museums and galleries.

“Color Field” can be experienced from whatever distance people are comfortable with. It’s easily incorporated into the daily exercise routines and evening strolls everyone seems to be taking right now; you can even bring along the dog.

If you go

“Color Field” is located in the southeast corner of City Park, close to 17th Avenue and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. It’s free and open day and night. Info at colorfielddenver.com.

The piece is also crafty and hand-made with materials you could find in a hobby store and, in that way, it connects meaningfully to a period when so many folks are sticking close to home and turning to sewing, woodworking, cooking and renovation activities to stay occupied.

That’s not exactly how the artists envisioned the project unfolding when they dreamed it up a few years back, during their own frequent walks through the park. They simply saw the site of a dried-up and abandoned sediment pond and had the idea of bringing it back to life in a meaningful way.

Not many Denverites know the history of the park’s old water system and neither did the artists, who moved to the city in 2012. So, they did some exploring, uncovering old maps and master plans of the area that showed the series of manufactured waterways, noting that the sediment pond was originally “constructed as a man-made work of art inspired by Monet’s composition of still water, weeping willows, and lily pads.”

The pond was incorporated in the grand scheme that landscape architect Saco DeBoer developed for the park during the City Beautiful movement in the early part of the 20th century. Some of DeBoer’s ideas have survived a century of evolution in City Park, but others, including the elaborate waterways on the east end of the open space, have been forsaken.

The Palmeris, who married in 2014, saw in the site a challenge that was perfect for their combined skill set. Sarah is a painter known for exploring vibrant reds, blues and yellows in her abstract work. Joshua is trained as an architect and currently works for the city as an urban planner. The project served as “a visual way for us to meet each other in the middle,” according to Sarah.

She brought color and shape to the piece; he brought dimensionality and interactivity.

“Our collaboration seems to work because we have such different ideas on how to solve problems,” Joshua said. “But we spend time working through how to reach the same objective together.”

The dried-up pond — more of a weedy ditch these days — still has the six, odd-shaped, concrete seed beds that would have been submerged under water to hold plants when the pond was full. The artists decided to fill them with color. They used the painted dowels to represent the sort of exaggerated hues Monet employed in his paintings.

Working in their own backyard with a roller brush, they painted the sticks — each one of them individually — in shades of purple, gold, blue, magenta and more. Then they installed them in the ditch, driving them deeply enough into the ground to hold steady, but keeping the top of each stick at the very height the lilies would be if they were floating on the filled pond.

“Color Field” looks swell from a distance but its real power unravels as you walk through and between the six fields of color, which come together into a kind of interactive maze.

The sticks are set in grids, exactly 8 inches apart in every direction, and painted different shades on each side. The piece appears to change color as you move through it.

The work, which was modeled using 3-D software, is energizing, but it’s also contemplative.

Sarah’s advice for viewing it: “Spend a few minutes doing a walking meditation when you arrive. Let your curiosity guide you in and around the work, pay attention to the sounds around you, and practice feeling the largeness of the space with your full body and breath.”

At its core, the piece is about using cues from both the past and present to remake an overlooked place in the city. That made it an attractive endeavor for its funder, Denver’s “P.S. You Are Here” creative place-making initiative, which supports projects that “aim to transform our underutilized urban spaces to increase collaboration, honor heritage, build civic engagement, beautify neighborhoods, enrich communities and inspire long-term change.”

Though “P.S. You Are Here” accomplishes that goal by backing short-term interventions, not permanent projects. “Color Field” will only be on display through September. After that the site will be integrated into the Denver Museum of Nature and Science’s “Nature Play” program, which will transform the area into an organic playground.

DMNS joined in supporting “Color Field,” along with Denver Arts and Venues, City Park Friends and Neighbors, City Park Alliance and the Denver Zoo.

The installation won’t be around forever, but that’s just fine.

In some ways, the piece was hampered by the pandemic. The artists originally wanted to invite students to help with the painting and construction and planned to host public programs. All that — and so much more — was quashed by the coronavirus and our need to keep apart rather than join together as a community.

But sometimes current events lift a piece of art to a higher purpose, and that’s the case here. In any other summer, “Color Field” might have been a minor gewgaw in a city crammed with seasonal splendors.

In 2020, it’s a star attraction, a chance to get up close and personal with art when so much local culture is a challenge to access; an oxygen-filled, stress-reducing break from the boxes we are compelled to live in for the time being.

It gets its meaning from the exact moment when it was born, and even if it lived a hundred years more, it would never again have the significance it holds right now. It’s a gift.


Yoga studios, boutique fitness not sure if they’ll be able to make it through coronavirus closures

Contemplating existential threats confronting the boutique fitness industry in the wake of COVID-19, Patrick Harrington finds a lesson in savasana, the “Corpse Pose” that typically brings yoga classes to a close.

“The reason that pose is practiced as often as it is — every single time — is because, philosophically, if you’re not willing to face your own death and let go of the parts that aren’t working in order for you to be reborn when you stand back up off the mat, life is really hard,” said Harrington, the founder of Kindness Yoga with nine locations in the Denver area. “I’m embracing every day dying a little death around the future of our business, because it’s unknown. Will boutique fitness make it? Will people come back?”

The degree to which members will come back when gyms reopen is a question vexing the entire fitness industry, but boutique studios face special challenges. By definition, they are smaller than big-name, big-box gyms, so conducting classes with social distancing severely limits the number of people they can serve in a given class. Often they are small privately owned businesses with high overhead costs, especially in Denver with its steep real estate prices.

RELATED: Denver gyms are preparing to reopen. Here’s how they plan to get you sweating safely.

Harrington said some yoga teachers have responded to the shutdown of studios by marketing their own online classes, creating a new source of competition in an industry that already had a lot of it.

“The average profit margin for a yoga studio is 7%,” Harrington said. “That’s a very thin margin, and it relied upon maximum occupancy. If you don’t have a business where you can have maximum occupancy, you don’t have a business. We are having to negotiate with all of our landlords and/or walk away, and/or declare bankruptcy because the opportunity to be four walls where people come together and spiritualize, practice yoga, work out, is no longer an advantage. It’s actually a disadvantage. All the risk the entrepreneurs took to become a boutique fitness location, there’s no upside to our risk anymore, at all. What used to be an upside potential for the risk has now shifted to be a complete downside.”

Danielle Barbeau, the sole owner of The River Yoga’s two Denver locations, says she is optimistic by nature and ”hopefully not naïve” regarding the future of boutique fitness. She is going forward with construction on a third studio but concedes it is an act of hope.

“I don’t think the boutique industry is dead by any means,” Barbeau said. “I do think it’s in a space of some transformation, and I don’t think everyone is going to survive this.”

Corina Lindley owns six Denver Endorphin studios and another in Eagle that offer yoga, barre, indoor cycling, high-intensity training and strength training. Having founded the business in 2007, she once had 11 studios but closed five in the past four years because of competition from national chains. She calls Endorphin, which she co-owns with her husband, a “creative passion project,” but even before COVID-19, there were times when she wondered if it was worth it.

“We’ve never had a year when it’s been so financially bad that we’ve decided to quit, but we’ve had plenty of years when we almost did,” Lindley said. “It’s the community that keeps us together, the faces and the emails that say, ‘Thank you for doing what you’re doing’ that keep us going.”

Lindley has been working 18-hour days since Colorado gyms closed in March, trying to hold her company together.

“I think that’s what it’s going to take,” Lindley said. “Hopefully that kind of work ethic is going to help take these boutique gyms into survival and success. We hope there’s enough people who still want that type of environment to work out. We feel strongly that we will survive. What that looks like going forward, we don’t know.”

Barbeau believes the fragmented boutique industry needed to “organize and professionalize” itself even before COVID-19.

“Now we are being challenged to organize and think ahead about what is going to make this industry sustainable for entrepreneurs and for individuals,” Barbeau said. “We as business owners are going to have to look at how do we increase our margins, how do we diversify our revenue streams, and how do we bring value in different ways to people who are willing to stick with us.”

Barbeau is investing in high-quality video technology for online classes, acknowledging that it’s a gamble while hoping members find it a lot more appealing than “Joe Schmo who is filming with his iPhone in his living room,” she said. The River is currently streaming five live classes daily, and on June 1 she will launch an on-demand membership site.

“That will be like Netflix for yoga classes, where you can get on at any time, you can pick which kind of class you want, and off you go,” Barbeau said. “We’re hoping a long-term investment in that will be another way to support our people, even once they can come back into the studio.”

There is still the dilemma that the appeal of boutique fitness is based in part on the social benefits of working out in groups, but COVID-19 isolates people who pursue fitness. Even after restrictions on gatherings are relaxed, some will be reluctant to return to group workouts.

Lindley can speak to the health side of the issue, having founded her studios following a career in public health where she worked in HIV, chronic disease and obesity prevention. She has a master’s degree in public health and epidemiology.

“We are human and social and connecting beings,” Lindley said. “This is a virus that is not going away. With the population of under 40, or even under 50, the mortality rate is very low. Yeah, it’s a little bit more than the flu, but we also have to live our lives and get on with things. The economic and mental and psychological effects of not going to the gym, I think, way out-weigh the risk of potentially getting COVID in these populations.”

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Montreal police arrest 11 after anti-racism protest in wake of George Floyd’s death

Montreal police say they have arrested 11 people in connection with the protest.


LIVE: Birmingham Mayor Woodfin to discuss protests in the city

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) Birmingham Mayor Randall L. Woodfin will hold a news conference Monday morning to discuss incidents that happened during protests in the City of Birmingham on Sunday, May 31, 2020.

Mayor Woodfin will be joined by Birmingham Fire Chief Cory Moon and Birmingham Police Chief Patrick Smith.

The press conference will take place at 9:30 a.m.


Coronavirus: Rogers Centre to be used as temporary facility to help Food Banks Canada

Rogers Centre, the home of the Toronto Blue Jays, is going to be temporarily converted into a giant food bank facility and will house more than 4.5 million kilograms of food.


Visitors to former quarry in Chinnor told to stay away

"Gangs of people" were at the disused quarry "without any concern for social distancing", an MP says.


Latino homes report serious COVID-19 symptoms nearly twice as often, survey of 1.6 million shows

In Wake Forest, North Carolina, a town of about 40,000 near Raleigh, a sweeping national survey of COVID-19 symptoms has exposed a staggering ethnic divide. Nearly two-thirds of Wake Forest’s Hispanic homes surveyed reported suffering the combination of symptoms most closely tied to the coronavirus, compared to less than 1% of everyone else. The survey by a marketing research company is believed to be the largest measurement of [...]


Detective Bureau

MEDIA CONTACT: 764-5605 Major Timothy G. Sanzi, Detective Commander

On May 29, 2020, members of the Rhode Island Violent Fugitive Task Force and the Massachusetts Violent Fugitive Apprehension Section arrested Michael DeCosta, age 23, of 235 Albion Street Apartment 1R, Fall River,...


Fire in Madoc leaves 2 people, dog with non-life-threatening burns

A fire on Old Madoc Road has left two people and a dog with burn injuries, according to the Belleville Fire Department. Damage is reportedly estimated at $10,000.


Coronavirus: Family of Covid-19 death Liverpool fan demands inquiry

The family of Richard Mawson believes he caught Covid-19 at a Champions League match in Liverpool.


Semi driver charged after truck rolls into Minneapolis protesters

MINNEAPOLIS — A man accused of driving his semi-truck into a group of protesters marching on a closed Minnesota freeway on Sunday has been charged with assault.

Authorities said 35-year-old Bogdan Vechirko’s alleged action incited “a crowd of peaceful demonstrators.”


Bogdan Vechirko (Credit: Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office)

None of the thousands marching over the death of George Floyd was hurt in the incident, according to the Department of Public Safety.

Vechirko was treated for minor injuries to his eyes and nose after getting into a scuffle with protesters.

The Minnesota State Patrol called it a “very disturbing” and “inciting” action by the driver, but it wasn’t clear whether it was deliberate, reported The Associated Press.

The incident happened on Interstate 35W near downtown Minneapolis. Officials said the truck appeared to have been on the closed section of freeway before barriers were put up.

Vechirko was being held without bail.


Hong Kong’s justice department will make all decisions to prosecute suspects under new national security law: minister

Any decision to prosecute suspects under the new national security law that Beijing is tailor-making for Hong Kong will rest with the city’s Department of Justice, instead of its mainland Chinese counterpart, Hong Kong’s justice minister has promised.Teresa Cheng Yeuk-wah pledged on Monday that the Hong Kong government would raise its concerns with China’s top legislative body, the National People’s Congress (NPC) Standing Committee, if common law principles and human rights safeguards were not…


Bruce Lauckner named new CAO for Waterloo Region

Waterloo Region has announced that Bruce Lauckner will replace longtime CAO Mike Murray this summer.


1 taken to hospital following house fire in Hamilton Township

Around 5:15 p.m. Sunday, Hamilton Township Fire Department were called to 8176 Jibb Rd. east of Camborne, Ont.


How to renew Kentucky licenses, ID cards online?

On Friday, May 29, Gov. Andy Beshear announced an official order temporarily authorizing circuit court clerk offices to process expired driving credential renewals and replacement requests remotely.

Cardholders whose operator’s license, permit or identification card was lost or expired between March 1 and June 30, 2020, may apply with their local circuit court clerk to receive a new card in the mail. The order allows the remote application process to remain through July 31, 2020.

The March emergency order is still in effect that extends the validity of cards by 90 days if the printed expiration date is March 18, 2020, or later.

governmentThe Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has reopened the Frankfort regional licensing office to offer select in-person services for residents of any Kentucky county. REAL ID applications cannot be accepted through the mail due to strict federal security standards. Applicants may visit realidky.com to schedule an appointment online and to learn more about the services offered. Walk-ins are welcome during office hours Monday through Friday 8 am to 4 pm.

Applicants requesting a card renewal must not require any testing. Circuit court clerks in the applicant’s county of residence will administer the application process and mail the credential directly to the applicant. More information is available on the Administrative Office of the Courts COVID-19 web page.

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Call today to advertise in Ace, 859.225.4889


George Floyd protests continue nationwide, 4,400 arrests reported; St. John’s Church in DC set on fire: live updates

Relative calm descended on Minneapolis and other U.S. cities Monday after protesters and police across the nation clashed for a sixth straight night in the wake of George Floyd's death.More than 4,400 arrests have been made at protests nationwide since viral video emerged showing former Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes on Memorial Day, resulting in Floyd's death. Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo apologized to [...]


Bell Canada to sell 25 data centres for $1.04B to Equinix

Bell says the deal includes a partnership with the Equinix platform of global data centre services.


OPP search for missing teen on Lower Beverley Lake

The Rideau Lakes Fire Department and OPP marine unit are assisting in the search for an 18-year-old who went missing after they went overboard while out in a canoe.


Hong Kong High Court resumes hearing jury trials after closures due to Covid-19 since January

The High Court has resumed hearing jury trials amid the coronavirus pandemic, with seven Hong Kong jurors empanelled to try a woman accused of murdering her six-year-old grandson two years ago.Prosecutor Michael Arthur on Monday opened his case against Kan Kwai-fong, 54, who has denied murdering her grandson, Endless Cheng Ting-hin, on March 18, 2018.The court heard the woman was accused of strangling the child with a brown nylon strap removed from a rucksack and attempting to stop rescuers…


‘You just got a letter out of the blue’: California state workers surprised by reassignments

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration moved quickly to place California state employees in positions as coronavirus contact tracers after his call for volunteers failed to come up with enough of them. … Click to Continue »


‘You just got a letter out of the blue’: California state workers surprised by reassignments

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration moved quickly to place California state employees in positions as coronavirus contact tracers after his call for volunteers failed to come up with enough of them. … Click to Continue »


Scituate Barracks

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov

No arrests to report.


Halifax non-profit offers new skills to seniors in nursing homes amid COVID-19

Non-profit Seniors with Skills is on a mission to end the social isolation of seniors across the globe.


Middlesex Barracks; Domestic Assault

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE                 CASE#:20A302171 TROOPER: David Lambert                                             STATION: VSP-Middlesex                     CONTACT#:802-229-9191   DATE/TIME: 05/31/2020 at 1051 hours LOCATION: Cabot, VT VIOLATION: Domestic Assault   ACCUSED: Jonathan Maxfield     AGE: 21


Need a job? California’s unemployment agency has 1,800 of them. You can start right away

California’s Employment Development Department needs help in a hurry. It’s hiring more than 1,800 people to manage the surge in unemployment benefit claims that followed the coronavirus outbreak. These new … Click to Continue »


Need a job? California’s unemployment agency has 1,800 of them. You can start right away

California’s Employment Development Department needs help in a hurry. It’s hiring more than 1,800 people to manage the surge in unemployment benefit claims that followed the coronavirus outbreak. These new … Click to Continue »


Toronto mayor to raise Pride flag in livestreamed ceremony

Toronto Mayor John Tory is expected to mark the beginning of Pride month today by raising the rainbow and transgender flags at city hall.


Zodiakos wins first race as British horse racing returns after coronavirus suspension

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Boy, 9, with cerebral palsy completes marathon on his walker, half a mile at a time

(CNN) — A 9-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and autism has raised $100,000 for charity after completing a marathon up and down his street using a walker.

Tobias Weller completed the final leg of his 26.2-mile marathon in Sheffield, northern England, on Sunday surrounded by socially distanced neighbors and well-wishers.

Cerebral palsy is a group of neurological disorders that affect the ability to move. According to his JustGiving page, Tobias cannot stand or walk unaided, and requires support with most tasks, but, inspired by Captain Tom Moore, a war veteran who raised millions for the UK’s National Health Service by walking laps of his garden ahead of his 100th birthday, Tobias set his sights on a marathon.

Tobias had been planning a sponsored 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) walk around a local park last month, but was unable to go ahead with it because of coronavirus lockdown restrictions.

“Then I heard about Captain Tom and I thought why don’t I use my walker to try to complete a marathon by walking up and down my street every day,” he said in a video ahead of the marathon, admitting it would be a “ginormous challenge.”


Tobias Garbutt, who has cerebral palsy and autism, is cheered on by neighbours as he walks along the street outside his home in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Nine-year-old Tobias, who cannot stand or walk unaided, has been inspired by Captain Tom Moore and is aiming to complete a marathon on his daily walks. His initial fundraising target of £500 for Sheffield Children’s Hospital and Paces School has been surpassed, and is now approaching £15,000. (Photo by Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images)

At the beginning of lockdown, Tobias could walk a maximum of 50 meters (164 feet) a day, but as he grew closer to completing his challenge — which took him 70 days, according to the PA Media news agency — he was walking up to 750 meters (half a mile) a day.

“I can’t believe I completed a marathon, it’s just awesome,” he told Sky News.

He said: “Every bit of it has been totally awesome.

“I love it when my neighbors clap and cheer for me. I’m getting stronger and stronger every day. It’s such a good feeling.”

So far, Tobias has raised over £81,600 ($100,700) — £50,000 more than his original target of £30,000 for Sheffield Children’s Hospital and Paces School, a school that supports children and adults with neurological conditions, including Tobias.

Tobias’ mother, Ruth Garbutt, said they were going to continue walking and were aiming to reach 50 kilometers (31 miles), PA Media reported.

“I’m so, so pleased that he’s completed his marathon. He’s done really well. He’s tried so hard all the way through. He’s really achieved a massive goal,” she said, according to PA.

“I’m bursting with pride for my little boy. He’s just magnificent.”


New rules in effect at Toronto Pearson Airport starting June 1

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Coronavirus lockdown easing: Litter piles up at beauty spots

Piles of litter cover beaches and parks after a warm weekend combined with more freedom of movement.


Bomb disposal experts called after suspected firebomb explodes outside family flat

Police bomb experts were called to a public housing block in Hong Kong on Sunday after a suspected firebomb exploded outside a family’s flat, force insiders said on Monday.Authorities believe a mobile phone found at the scene was the detonation device and are treating the case as arson.Three family members were inside their flat on the 24th floor of Wing Shue House at Lei Muk Shue Estate in Tsuen Wan when the device exploded with a bang shortly before 5am on Sunday. They used buckets of water…


Coronavirus: City of Kingston ‘encouraged’ by Ontario’s regional approach to reopening

"More and more people are seeing that a one-size-fits-all approach for Ontario just isn't working. I really think it’s worth that second look," said Kingston Mayor Bryan Paterson.


Trump briefly taken to underground bunker as protests grew outside White House

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump was briefly moved to the White House's underground bunker Friday night to shelter in place for a brief period of time as the protest grew outside the Executive Mansion. The protests over George Floyd's death hit the nation's capital Friday night as angry protesters arrived at Pennsylvania Avenue, leading to a lockdown at the White House. Outside the White House on Friday, Secret Service could be [...]


‘Vulnerable’ birds breed at old Herefordshire gravel pit

Oystercatchers, whose numbers have been in decline since the 1990s, are filmed at the inland lake.


Killed bills: 9 measures Colorado lawmakers won’t vote on this year because of COVID-19

Colorado lawmakers killed a bunch of bills in their first days back to work after a more than two-month hiatus, and they expect the “bloodbath,” as many have called it, to continue.

Rep. Jonathan Singer, a Longmont Democrat, said the House Public Health Care and Human Services Committee alone killed more bills in two hours than probably in the last two years combined.

“These are gut-wrenching decisions,” he said. “There’s not going to be a lot of dry eyes at the end of this.”

Singer had a list of what he wanted to get done this year — his last in the House. But the pandemic had other plans. Lawmakers will likely deep-six more bills than they pass as they try to wrap up their 2020 session in just three weeks.

The legislature, which recessed in March because of the coronavirus pandemic, resumed Tuesday. It’s unclear if lawmakers will change their projected end date after shutting down the Capitol on Friday and Saturday amid Denver protests over the George Floyd killing.

Leaders say the bills that stay have to have essentially no financial cost, be urgent or related to the coronavirus, and not require a lot of time.

Bills that can move quickly are those that don’t have opposition or are already at least halfway through the process. Wednesday’s lengthy debate on remote voting, which Republicans opposed, painted a clear picture of why the Democratic majority can’t afford to schedule many controversial bills if they want to finish in three weeks.

That’s why some of Democrats’ biggest priorities are being sidelined, including gun safety bills, the public health insurance option, and paid family and medical leave.

Here are nine of the most high-profile bills that were killed in committees this week:

Bill: Safe2Tell, House Bill 1005
What it would do: The bill would make improvements to the state’s Safe2Tell tip line, which allows users to submit anonymous reports about issues related to safety of a student or someone else in the school system. The bill carried a $50,000 price tag to develop training materials, a process that would have a crisis operator answer crisis calls and an educational campaign about using and misusing the program. It came out of the interim school safety committee.
How it died: The bill was postponed indefinitely on a 3-2 vote.

Bill: Human body composting, House Bill 1060
What it would do: The bill would allow Coloradans to compost bodies after death as an alternative to burial or cremation.
How it died: The Senate State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee postponed it indefinitely.

Bill: Colorectal cancer screening, House Bill 1103
What it would do: The bill would require insurers to provide colorectal cancer screenings for Coloradans who are 45 and older.
How it died: The Senate Committee on Health and Human Services postponed the bill indefinitely on a 5-0 vote.

Bill: Gay or transgender panic defense, House Bill 1307
What it would do: The bill would prohibit using a person’s actual or perceived gender, gender identity, gender expression or sexual orientation as an argument in a criminal case, including if the victim made unwanted sexual advances. Sponsors opposed killing the bill because it is bipartisan and carries no cost. Though it’s hard to track how many times such a defense has been used, advocates said the bill was about sending a message.
How it died: The Senate Judiciary postponed the bill indefinitely on a 3-2 vote.

Bill: Phone use while driving, Senate Bill 65
What the bill would do: The bill would establish penalties for people who use their phones while driving except through a hands-free device.
How it died: The House Transportation and Local Government Committee postponed the bill on an 11-0 vote.

Bill: Citizenship status, Senate Bill 108
What the bill would do: The bill would prohibit landlords from asking tenants questions about citizenship status or disclosing that information to anyone.
How it died: The House Business Affairs and Labor Committee postponed the bill indefinitely on a 10-0 vote.

Bill: Gray wolves, Senate Bill 121
What the bill would do: The bill would create a management plan for reintroducing gray wolves in Colorado. Sponsor Sen. Kerry Donovan, D-Vail, introduced it because she felt a ballot measure seeking to reintroduce gray wolves failed to adequately address potential issues.
How it died: The Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources postponed the bill indefinitely on a 4-0 vote.

Bill: RTD, Senate Bill 151
What the bill would do: The bill would add more oversight and transparency to the Regional Transportation District board and its management structure amid concerns about the transit system’s operation and dropping ridership.
How it died: The Senate Judiciary postponed the bill indefinitely on a 5-0 vote.

Bill: Behavior analysts in schools, House Bill 1058
What the bill would do: This was part Democrats’ mental health agenda along with expanded behavioral health training for educators — another bill that has been laid over.
How it died: The Senate Education Committee postponed the bill indefinitely on a 5-0 vote.

Also nixed were bills to expand multilingual ballot access, ban exotic animals in traveling circuses and require the use of plain language in hospital bills.

The two chambers have also laid over bills until lawmakers are long gone — known as letting them die on the calendar. That list includes bills to prohibit restaurants from using polystyrene to-go containers, limit single-use plastics and prohibit selling flavored nicotine products.

A number of draft bills that weren’t introduced before the break are unlikely to see the light of day this year, including one to automatically clear past marijuana convictions and another to limit driver’s license suspensions over unpaid court fines.


Colorado lawmakers launch bipartisan effort to repeal Gallagher Amendment

The vision of an empty fire station in Glenwood Springs keeps Fire Chief Gary Tillotson up nights. Should a fire break out or someone need medical aid, help would have to come from further away — meaning much longer response times when people can least afford them.

The vast majority of the fire department’s calls are for medical emergencies like heart attacks and strokes, Tillotson said — situations in which the chances of death escalate dramatically if responders don’t arrive within five to seven minutes.

But if the department’s $4 million annual budget dwindles any further, that vision of empty fire stations and delayed response times will become a reality.

The coronavirus pandemic has already meant a costly drop in sales tax revenue for the Glenwood Springs Fire Department, and the economic devastation the pandemic is wreaking — combined with a state law called the Gallagher Amendment — means local governments’ property tax revenues will suffer for years to come.

“It’s an insurmountable obstacle,” Tillotson said. “We work on a relatively meager operations budget anyway and with the current devastation to our sales tax, we’re already having to cut back and basically we’re furloughing our firefighters. Any further cuts are going to reduce service.”

Gallagher ties residential property taxes to commercial property taxes, so the pandemic’s extreme impact on Colorado businesses’ bottom lines will result in significant property-tax decreases across the board for years to come, experts expect.

Unless the amendment is removed from the state Constitution.

To head off the upcoming financial crisis, Sen. Jack Tate, R-Centennial, said he and a bipartisan group of lawmakers are proposing to repeal the 1982 Gallagher Amendment, which they say has become a twisted version of what was once a good idea.

The measure will be introduced Monday, said Sen. Chris Hansen, D-Denver. It will be followed by a second measure to freeze residential property tax rates for several years.

Lawmakers have wanted to do away with the amendment for decades, but the pandemic has created a new sense of urgency.

“Right now we’re in a moment because of a pandemic, where the economy is hurting and a lot of people are therefore hurting as well,” said Rep. Daneya Esgar, a Pueblo Democrat who’s chair of the Joint Budget Committee. “If we don’t fix the Gallagher Amendment that hurt can be felt even deeper.”

The amendment’s namesake, Dennis Gallagher, said he’s abstaining from an opinion until he sees the specific proposal. In theory, a repeal makes sense, he said.

“I understand it completely,” he said.

But something must be put in place to maintain the idea behind the amendment, Gallagher added.

What is the Gallagher Amendment?

In short, the Gallagher Amendment is meant to protect homeowners by keeping residential tax rates lower than commercial rates, Gallagher said. Property owners “back east” in New Jersey pay through the nose each month, he said in an interview, and he wanted to prevent that from happening in Colorado.

The amendment categorizes all properties as either residential or commercial and mandates that homeowners pay no more than 45% of the property tax total. Commercial properties are always billed 29% of their building’s value, and the residential rate floats to maintain the 55/45 split.

“It leveled property taxes for residential property owners and ratepayers in Colorado, and it’s been working,” Gallagher said.

What’s the problem?

The issue is that while the commercial property tax rate is constant, the values of commercial properties are not, Tate said. Those properties are largely assessed based on the income of the businesses inside them.

And that income is falling drastically after two to three months of shutdowns and the overall economic slowdown brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, Tate said. As income drops, so do property values and commercial tax revenue.

To maintain the legally required 45/55 ratio, residential property tax rates will also have to drop.

Estimates from the state’s property tax administrator show that residential rates could drop from the current 7.15% to 5.88%, spelling a $491 million cut for school districts statewide and a $204 million cut for county governments, as Chalkbeat reported.

“The impact on schools is going to be brutal if we don’t repeal Gallagher,” Hansen said. “Massive.”

And that lost revenue will stay lost, Esgar said. While the Gallagher Amendment allows residential rates to float up and down as needed, a second amendment passed in 1992, the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights, prevents the taxes from rising again, she said.

“If we get rid of Gallagher before the residential assessment rate drops, we can at least maintain where it is right now,” Esgar said. Otherwise, “we’ll never be able to get back to where we are now.”

Repealing the amendment would prevent residential property taxes from falling in conjunction with commercial rates, but it wouldn’t raise rates for homeowners, Esgar said.

“We’re not raising your taxes,” she said. “We can’t.”

If Gallagher isn’t repealed, fire departments across the state will lose a substantial amount of cash. Already the Glenwood Springs department’s 28 full-time employees face staggered furloughs, but another hit to the budget would mean fire stations would go unstaffed, Tillotson said. Emergency calls would be answered by other stations across town or from neighboring departments dealing with their own budget shortfalls.

“Some of those are a 10- or 20-minute drive away,” he said. “If you’re having a heart attack, you don’t want that to happen.”

The same goes for house fires, he said.

“The size of a fire escalates exponentially for every minute that we’re not there,” he said. “We work really, really hard to build fire stations and staff them within five miles of our major populations. So when one of those stations closes and now we’re eight or 10 miles to the nearest staffed fire station, that exponentially affects the response time.”

The amendment already has been particularly problematic for Western Slope communities, where property values haven’t risen as high or as fast as those on the Front Range.

But the pandemic has touched every corner of the state, and revenue drops would hit every agency that depends on property taxes — hospitals, libraries, ambulance services, cities and state government, in addition to schools and fire departments.

“This is community-level impact that we’re talking about,” Esgar said.

The legislature can address the problem putting a measure on the fall ballot asking voters to repeal the amendment, she said.  It will be difficult, she acknowledged. Both chambers of the legislature must approve the measure with a two-thirds majority. But she and Tate said they believe the support is there.

Then the measure would only need a simple majority from voters for passage, Hansen said.

The effort is sure to face opposition, although none has announced itself so far.

“We are studying it,” said Jon Caldera, president of the conservative Independence Institute and a frequent opponent of tax changes.

But if there’s strong bipartisan support in the legislature, Hansen said, that should help in November.

Tillotson said education will be key in the push to repeal the amendment, and representatives of libraries, fire departments, schools and other affected agencies will be happy to do the educating.

“Gallagher’s been on the books for a very long time, and as homeowners that’s a tough sell,” he said.

It’s a tradeoff, Tillotson said. Repeal would mean that property taxes remain where they are, but then so, too, would the firefighters in Glenwood Springs’ fire stations.


2 Atlanta investigators fired in ‘excessive force’ arrests

Editor’s note: The above video may be disturbing to some. Viewer discretion is advised.

ATLANTA (WSAV) — Atlanta’s mayor says two city police investigators have been fired and three officers are on desk duty following an arrest Saturday involving two college students.

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said the police used excessive force while arresting Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, students at Morehouse College and Spelman College respectively.

The investigators, identified as Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter, were part of the Atlanta Police Department’s (APD) Fugitive Unit. On Saturday, they were assisting with civil disturbances in the city when the incident involving Young and Pilgrim occurred.

Gardner served APD for 22 years and Streeter had been with the department since 2003.

Video of the incident, that first gained attention online and on local news, shows a group of police officers in riot gear and gas masks surrounding a car being driven by the students. The officers pulled Pilgrim out of the vehicle and appeared to use a stun gun on the vehicle’s occupants.

The two students did not appear to be fighting the police. Bottoms said Pilgrim was released without charges. She also said she was ordering the charges against Young be dropped.

The mayor said she and APD Chief Erika Shields made the decision to fire the officers after reviewing body-camera footage.

“Use of excessive force is never acceptable,” Bottoms told reporters Sunday. Shields called the footage “really shocking to watch” and apologized to the students.

Saturday night, more than 150 people were arrested for various violations during the protest, according to the mayor.

Shields praised other officers, many who are having knives and rocks thrown at them. One is in intensive care following a collision with an ATV.

The city remains under a curfew from 9 p.m. until Monday morning. Bottoms said it may be extended.


One-third of California renters unsure if they can make June payment, census survey shows

More than one-third of California home renters say they have little or no confidence that they will be able to pay rent in June, according to a new survey from … Click to Continue »


Lincoln Woods Barracks

At 7:59 PM, Troopers of the Traffic Safety Unit arrested Michael Domenech, age 35, of 229 Valley street, Apt. #1, Providence, RI for 1.) Driving Under the Influence of Intoxication Liquor and/or Drugs – BAC Unknown – 1st Offense, 2.) Possession of Marijuana – More than One Ounce – 1st Offense and 3.


Scott Peterson’s appeal for new trial to be heard by California Supreme Court

More than 15 years after he was found guilty in the murder of his wife and their unborn son — in a case that brought international notoriety to Modesto — … Click to Continue »


Hope Valley Barracks

No arrests to report.

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov


Millions of Californians could lose affordable housing in recession, advocates warn

With rent due for another new month in the coronavirus outbreak, affordable housing advocates warn that the new recession could trigger a domino effect wiping out protections for millions of … Click to Continue »


Lost your job during coronavirus pandemic? Here are some new ones to try

Looking for a job? Try pharmacies or fast food restaurants. They have the most private coronavirus-related job openings in the state, according to a survey by Zippia, a Millbrae-based firm … Click to Continue »


President Trump took shelter in White House bunker as protests raged

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secret Service agents rushed President Donald Trump to a White House bunker on Friday night as hundreds of protesters gathered outside the executive mansion, some of them throwing rocks and tugging at police barricades.

Trump spent nearly an hour in the bunker, which was designed for use in emergencies like terrorist attacks, according to a Republican close to the White House who was not authorized to publicly discuss private matters and spoke on condition of anonymity. The account was confirmed by an administration official who also spoke on condition of anonymity.

The abrupt decision by the agents underscored the rattled mood inside the White House, where the chants from protesters in Lafayette Park could be heard all weekend and Secret Service agents and law enforcement officers struggled to contain the crowds.

Friday’s protests were triggered by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after he was pinned at the neck by a white Minneapolis police officer. The demonstrations in Washington turned violent and appeared to catch officers by surprise. They sparked one of the highest alerts on the White House complex since the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001 .

“The White House does not comment on security protocols and decisions,” said White House spokesman Judd Deere. The Secret Service said it does not discuss the means and methods of its protective operations. The president’s move to the bunker was first reported by The New York Times.

The president and his family have been shaken by the size and venom of the crowds, according to the Republican. It was not immediately clear if first lady Melania Trump and the couple’s 14-year-old son, Barron, joined the president in the bunker. Secret Service protocol would have called for all those under the agency’s protection to be in the underground shelter.

Trump has told advisers he worries about his safety, while both privately and publicly praising the work of the Secret Service.

Trump traveled to Florida on Saturday to view the first manned space launch from the U.S. in nearly a decade. He returned to a White House under virtual siege, with protesters — some violent — gathered just a few hundred yards away through much of the night.

Demonstrators returned Sunday afternoon, facing off against police at Lafayette Park into the evening.

Trump continued his effort to project strength, using a series of inflammatory tweets and delivering partisan attacks during a time of national crisis.

As cities burned night after night and images of violence dominated television coverage, Trump’s advisers discussed the prospect of an Oval Office address in an attempt to ease tensions. The notion was quickly scrapped for lack of policy proposals and the president’s own seeming disinterest in delivering a message of unity.

Trump did not appear in public on Sunday. Instead, a White House official who was not authorized to discuss the plans ahead of time said Trump was expected in the coming days to draw distinctions between the legitimate anger of peaceful protesters and the unacceptable actions of violent agitators.

On Sunday, Trump retweeted a message from a conservative commentator encouraging authorities to respond with greater force.

“This isn’t going to stop until the good guys are willing to use overwhelming force against the bad guys,” Buck Sexton wrote in a message amplified by the president.

In recent days security at the White House has been reinforced by the National Guard and additional personnel from the Secret Service and the U.S. Park Police.

On Sunday, the Justice Department deployed members of the U.S. Marshals Service and agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration to supplement National Guard troops outside the White House, according to a senior Justice Department official. The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.


Photo shows moment of solidarity between Nashville officer and protester

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — A moment of peace and solidarity was captured in a photo between a Nashville police officer and a protester during Saturday’s ‘I Will Breathe’ protests.

The photo, taken by Elise Haines, appears to show the two praying together during an intense time. The photo has 5,200 likes and was retweeted 509 times.

One commenter said the photo to her looked as if the two were bowing their heads out of “submission and respect.”

Metro Police said the officer in the photo was officer Garren Hoskins.

Despite the peaceful moment captured in a photo, protests turned to riots Saturday. A curfew was issued soon afterward to curb the violence and vandalism.


Denver weather: Sunny and hot with chance of afternoon rain

It’s beginning to feel a lot like summer.

Warm weather and mostly sunny skies are in the forecast for Denver Monday before possible storms in the afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.

The high temperature is expected to reach 91 degrees with an overnight low of 61. There is a 30% chance of rain and thunderstorms in the metro area after 3 p.m., falling to 20% in the evening, according to the NWS.

The warm weather is expected to continue with temperatures reaching the high 80s to low 90s with slight chances of afternoon thunderstorms through the end of the week. Tuesday’s high will be 88 degrees with a low of 60 in the nighttime.


Largest cities in Alabama, including Huntsville, advocating for no-excuse absentee voting

Under Alabama’s current law, an excuse is required for someone to vote absentee.

However, some of the largest cities in the state, including Huntsville, are on their way toward adopting resolutions arguing in favor of no-excuse absentee voting.

According to our news partners at AL.com, Mobile could join Birmingham and Huntsville on Tuesday in supporting similarly-worded resolutions that supports an option for residents to vote absentee during the coronavirus pandemic without having to submit an excuse as to why they are not showing up physically at the polls on election day.

The timing of the resolutions is likely not going to matter during this year’s elections, and the Alabama Republican Party says they “lack teeth.”

The runoff contests are scheduled for July 14, followed by the general election on Nov. 3.

A majority of Alabama cities are also scheduled to have mayoral and council elections on Aug. 25.

The Alabama Legislature is not scheduled to meet until the spring of 2021.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill said he was aware of the resolutions and urged the council members to “drop legislation in the 2021 legislative session and debate the issue.”

The deadline to submit absentee ballot applications is July 9.


Culvert Repairs and Replacements in Butte & Meade Counties

The South Dakota Department of Transportation says work is beginning this week to replace box culverts under Highway 212 at mile markers 48, 49 and 50, east of Newell.


Morgan County Sheriff’s Office arrests Decatur man after Sunday multi-agency chase

MORGAN COUNTY, Ala. – A Decatur man faces multiple charges after a chase that went through central Morgan County Sunday.

The sheriff’s office posted on social media that 33-year-old Justin Harold Callahan was issued over a dozen traffic citations and numerous felony criminal charges.

Deputies arrested Callahan after a chase that started in downtown Falkville and continued on Mount Tabor Road, crossing Highway 36 into Somerville, Gum Springs Road, and moving on to Highway 67 in Florette.

Callahan lost control of his car while trying to avoid spike strips on Highway 67.

The Sheriff’s Office said the chase lasted 30 minutes and involved deputies, along with State Troopers and officers from Falkville and Priceville.


Arrest made after 8 California homeless people given poisoned food

LOS ANGELES (AP) One person was arrested after eight homeless people were given poisoned food that sent several to the hospital in Huntington Beach.

The poisonings occurred over the course of about a week in mid-May, authorities said.

The victims were given food laced with oleoresin capsicum, “which is twice as strong as the pepper spray used by police, and their reactions to the poisoned food were filmed,” according to an advisory from the county district attorney’s office, which planned to provide more details at a news conference next Monday.

“The victims suffered a variety of symptoms including seizure-like symptoms, difficulty breathing, vomiting, and intense mouth and stomach pain,” the announcement said. “Several of the victims required hospitalization.”

No deaths were reported.

An investigation continued to determine whether there are more victims or suspects, authorities said.


New licensing commissioners for Hannoveraner Verband

Following a meeting at the end of last week, the Hannoveraner Verband has announced that their licensing commission will, for the first time, make discipline-based decisions in two groups. For this purpose, dressage rider Hannes Baumgart and international showjumper Markus Beerbarm will join their ranks. Henceforth, instead of judging all stallions together with the breeding […]


How AI, virtual reality and augmented reality will improve social services: the future of health care in the 5G era

When Korean television show Meeting You, in February this year, helped a mother “reunite” with her deceased seven-year-old daughter using digital technology, it was considered a groundbreaking moment.The show used virtual reality (VR), touch-sensitive gloves and audio to allow the mother to hold “conversations” with the girl and touch her, creating something of a “real life” experience. The emotional story made headlines around the world.This is just one of the ways digital technology will…


Coronavirus: Hong Kong retail sales still falling but April figures offer signs of hope

The damage caused by the Covid-19 pandemic to Hong Kong’s retail sector showed signs of easing in April, with the value of retail sales dropping 36.1 per cent year on year, a slight improvement from the 42.1 per cent year-on-year contraction in March.But the sector still marked its 15th consecutive month of contraction in April, according to provisional figures released on Monday by the Census and Statistics Department, while the city’s retail management association has warned of a “very…


Hong Kong muggings jump nearly fourfold in first quarter as police sources say riot squad duties pulling officers off foot patrols

Hong Kong recorded a 370 per cent increase in street robberies for the first three months of this year, a fact police sources say is a reflection of ongoing manpower issues first encountered during last year’s anti-government protests.While the 33 cases recorded are low for a major metropolis, they represent a major jump from the seven robberies handled in the year-ago period. Almost two-thirds took place between the hours of 6pm and 6am, according to police.“The increase can be attributed to…


Odion Ighalo: Manchester United extend striker’s loan to January

Shanghai Shenhua and Nigeria forward Odion Ighalo extends his loan deal at Manchester United until January 2021.


NYPD officers take a knee with Queens protesters

In New York, after days of unrest, Sunday was found to be a day of solidarity. NYPD officers knelt with demonstrators in Queens.

A march in the area passed the 103rd precinct, where a pastor within the group asked officers to join them.

Several not only entered the circle, but knelt on the ground.


FA and Premier League clubs must outline ‘intentions’ for women’s football, says shadow sports minister

Shadow sports minister Alison McGovern criticises the decision to abandon the Women's Super League and Women's Championship seasons.


Mass gatherings, erosion of trust upend coronavirus control

Protests erupting across the nation over the past week — and law enforcement's response to them — are threatening to upend efforts by health officials to track and contain the … Click to Continue »


Semi-truck driver arrested after driving through Minneapolis protesters

A semi driver is in custody in Minneapolis after the truck he was driving was captured speeding through a crowd of protesters on a bridge.

According to reports, some of the protesters were kneeling on the bridge when the tanker truck drove into the crowd Sunday. The truck did stop in the crowd, and protesters are seen climbing on top of it, and pulling the driver out of the cab.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation says while no protesters were seriously hurt, the driver Bogdan Vechirko is being treated for non-life threatening injuries and has been charged with assault.


Wareham Forest: Fire ‘flares up’ 24 hours after being put out

The fire at Wareham Forest started on 18 May and is thought to have been started by a barbeque.


North York Moors waterfall tombstoning rescue takes four hours

The man suffered spinal injuries after falling into a shallow pool, the fire service say.


England v Australia series in October and November cancelled

England's Ashes series against Australia, scheduled for October and November, is cancelled.


Protests, vandalism lead to California curfews

National Guard soldiers deployed in Los Angeles and two other California cities to back up police forces trying to stop waves of violence, vandalism and arson amid passionate protests against … Click to Continue »


Hong Kong police cite Covid-19 threat in banning city’s annual Tiananmen Square vigil for first time in 30 years

Hong Kong police have officially banned the city’s annual Tiananmen Square vigil for the first time in 30 years, citing ongoing social-distancing measures and health concerns amid the Covid-19 pandemic.The vigil’s organiser, the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, said alliance members would still enter Victoria Park to observe a moment of silence that night, and called on the public to light candles across the city to commemorate the June 4, 1989,…


Enhanced lockdown powers needed in Brighton, council says

The city council say the influx of visitors and drunken behaviour is making local people feel unsafe.


Hong Kong labour minister Law Chi-kwong says undersecretary appointment was no political reward

Hong Kong’s labour and welfare minister Law Chi-kwong has rejected allegations that the appointment of a pro-Beijing unionist as his deputy was a political reward for the camp.He stressed that Ho Kai-ming, formerly a Federation of Trade Unions (FTU) lawmaker, was his top choice.“When I came to know that my former deputy (Caspar Tsui Ying-wai) would become the new secretary for home affairs, I started thinking who should replace him,” Law told reporters. “The first person who I thought would be…


QPR ‘appalled’ by EFL plans for Championship return on 20 June

QPR chief executive Lee Hoos says the club is "vehemently opposed" to the EFL's plans for the Championship to return on 20 June.


Ex-doctor arrested over patient sexual assault claims in Salford

Police said the alleged historical abuse is said to have happened over a number of years in Salford.


Middlesex Barracks – DUI

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A302185 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Tpr. Crista Maurice                             STATION: Middlesex Barracks                    CONTACT#: 229-9191   DATE/TIME: 06/01/2020, 0033 hours INCIDENT LOCATION: I 89, NB, near exit 7, Berlin, VT VIOLATION:  


Information

211 S Carroll
On Sunday evening, MPD officers were present in the State Street area to protect community members' First Amendment Rights and maintain public & #8230;


Chelsea Flower Show: Yorkshire garden voted best of decade

It is voted as the best garden to be featured at the Chelsea Flower Show over the last 10 years.


Five Hong Kong university heads cite ‘stability’ in supporting new security law, while underscoring city’s longstanding rights

The heads of five of Hong Kong’s eight publicly funded universities have jointly backed Beijing’s plan to impose a national security law on the city, while pledging to uphold academic freedom and institutional autonomy.In a rare joint statement, the presidents of the University of Hong Kong, Chinese University and Polytechnic, Lingnan and Education universities on Monday offered their support for the legislation aimed at outlawing acts of “subversion, secession, terrorism or conspiring with…


BBL ends seasons early with no title awarded

The British Basketball League ends the 2019-20 season early and the title will not be awarded because of the coronavirus pandemic.


Many state offices in California cities ordered to close

The state Department of Human Resources sent a directive to close all California state buildings “with offices in downtown city areas” Monday, a sweeping mandate that covers everything from Department … Click to Continue »


Silver Alert

Alert Status: 
Active
Preliminary Information of Missing Subject: 
Peoria Police seek the public’s help in locating, Harold Beasley, an 84-year-old male. He is described as a white male, 5’08”, 150lbs., with grey/white hair and brown eyes. He was last seen wearing a blue short sleeve shirt with a pendant on left chest and blue jeans. Harold was last seen on May 28, at approximately 3 p.m., at his residence in the area of 10700 W Northern Ave. The family is concerned because they are unaware of where he may have gone and have not heard from him. Harold is most likely driving 2005, white, Ford 350 four-door truck with a white camper shell. The vehicle is bearing Arizona License AZ: CD49036. According to family, Harold suffers from dementia and other medical issues. Officers have been actively looking for Harold, but have not been able to locate him. Anyone who sees Harold or the vehicle is encouraged to contact Police.
Investigating Agency (if in Arizona): 
Peoria Police Department
Date Subject Went Missing: 
Sunday, May 31, 2020 - 10:50pm
Last known location: 
W. Griswold Road,
Peoria, AZ

United States

Point of Contact (Name): 
Peoria PD
Point of Contact (Number): 
(623) 773-8311
Missing Subject's Full Name: 
Harold Beasley
Vehicle State/License Plate : 
AZ / CD49036
Missing Subject: 
Release Date: 
Sunday, May 31, 2020
Vehicle Make & Model: 
Ford F-350 Pickup with White Camper Shell
DOB: 
Friday, June 14, 1935
Vehicle Color: 
white
Gender: 
Male
Vehicle Year: 
2005
Height: 
5-8
Weight: 
150 lbs
Hair Color: 
white
Eye Color: 
Brown
Race: 
White

Legendary DJs use shows to ease virus exile among Latinos

A woman who identified herself Rachel from San Ysidro, California, called in the syndicated “The Art Laboe Connection Show” last month with a message for Alex “the Wizard.” “Babe, I … Click to Continue »


Mass gatherings, erosion of trust upend coronavirus control

NEW YORK — Protests erupting across the nation over the past week — and law enforcement’s response to them — are threatening to upend efforts by health officials to track and contain the spread of coronavirus just as those efforts were finally getting underway.

Health experts need newly infected people to remember and recount everyone they’ve interacted with over several days in order to alert others who may have been exposed, and prevent them from spreading the disease further. But that process, known as contact tracing, relies on people knowing who they’ve been in contact with — a daunting task if they’ve been to a mass gathering.

And the process relies on something that may be suddenly be in especially short supply: Trust in government.

“These events that are happening now are further threats to the trust we need,” said Dr. Sandro Galea, dean of the Boston University School of Public Health. “If we do not have that, I worry our capacity to control new outbreaks becomes more limited,” he said.

Government officials have been hoping to continue reopening businesses, churches and other organizations after months of stay-at-home orders and other infection-prevention measures. But health experts also hoped that any reopening would be accompanied by widespread testing, contact tracing and isolation to prevent new waves of illness from beginning.

Over the past week, protests sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pinned a knee to his neck, have involved thousands of people gathered tightly together in large crowds in more than 20 cities nationwide.

It’s unclear if the protests themselves will trigger large new outbreaks. The protests were outside, where infections don’t spread as readily as indoors. Also, many of the protesters were wearing masks, and much of the contact was likely less-hazardous “transient” moments of people moving around, passing each other, said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious diseases expert at Vanderbilt University.

But, still, experts worry that public efforts to contain the disease in the future could be undermined.

In Los Angeles, the city’s mayor announced Saturday that COVID-19 testing centers were being closed because of safety concerns related to violent protests. Testing in Minneapolis will be affected because some of the clinics that provide the service have been damaged in the protests, according to a city government spokesperson.

Reduced testing could “be giving the virus another head start,” Schaffner said.

And contract tracing, which is only just getting going in several states, is an even bigger concern. It involves people who work for or with health departments asking intimate questions about where a person has been and who they’ve been talking to — and getting full, truthful answers in return.

“In this current environment which has enhanced or brought forth a mistrust of governmental authority, it might make them disinclined to speak with anyone in government,” Schaffner said.

That is especially true in black communities trying to cope with episodes of police violence and longstanding frustrations with how they have been marginalized and mistreated by people who work for government agencies. And those are the communities that have been hardest hit by the coronavirus in the U.S. and most in need of public health measures to help control it.

In a press conference Saturday, Minnesota Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington used the term “contact tracing” when describing an investigation into arrested protesters there. He said the goal is to “see if there are crime or white supremacy organizations that have played a role” and “to understand how do we go after them, legally,” Harrington said.

But Harrington’s use of “contact tracing” by law enforcement may complicate the job of help health workers as they try to track the virus’s spread, some experts said.

“That was an abuse of the word ‘contact tracing.’ That is not what contact tracing is,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Contact tracing is a service to patients and their contacts to provide services for patients and warning for contacts. It has nothing to do with police activity. Nothing,” said Frieden, who currently president of Resolve to Save Lives, a nonprofit that works to prevent epidemics.

Galea said he hopes many people will separate in their minds the contact tracing done by public health workers from crime investigations by the police. But, he added, “I do think sometimes it’s difficult to make a distinction when you feel marginalized by, and targeted by, the the entire government.”

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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California state government closing offices Monday because of protests

State government offices in downtown city areas in California will be closed Monday due to protests, according to a Government Operations Agency spokeswoman. “After consultation with the California Highway Patrol … Click to Continue »


Inslee orders statewide activation of National Guard

Gov. Jay Inslee ordered a statewide activation of the Washington National Guard tonight in response to the spread of destructive protests and looting in Washington state.


Coronavirus: amid new Hong Kong infections, microbiologist pushes for stepped up testing, closer quarantine monitoring

Hong Kong health authorities should step up community testing for Covid-19, as there could be new sources of the virus, a top microbiologist said after a local couple were confirmed sick on Sunday.While the Centre for Health Protection said it was still investigating the virus’ possible transmission routes, two of the 34-year-old woman’s colleagues at a temperature-controlled imported food warehouse also tested “weak positive”, indicating a possible workplace infection.Hong Kong’s tally of…


Hong Kong group matching jobless protesters with firms says Companies Registry holding up application

A group that previously expressed support for Hong Kong’s independence and protest movement says its application to incorporate a new company was being held up by the Companies Registry department, which has asked it to clarify past public statements.The founders of The Coming Dawn Facebook page have been matching job-seeking protesters with employers for several months via the social media platform. They hope to establish a company using the same name to take their initiative further, but…


Peaceful demonstration in Big Spring Park honors George Floyd

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Multiple protests over the death of George Floyd have taken place across the Tennessee Valley this weekend. Demonstrators in Huntsville gathered Sunday night to honor his life in a creative way.

Event organizers said they wanted to take a different approach to protesting because grief is subjective. Families had the chance to share how they felt with chalk and temporary paint in Big Spring Park.

Organizer Chandra Crutcher said, “If I had a message for the family of George Floyd it would be we are you. We hurt for you. We cry for you. We pray for you. We’ll fight for you.”

She added the fight for justice will continue and said she hopes everyone remembers to continue using their voices to help the unheard.

Crutcher encouraged people to acknowledge their privilege and use it to make the country a better place.


Spirits are high at Irons Distillery

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. –  There are several distillers who make whiskey in Alabama. We caught up with one bourbon maker in Huntsville who couldn’t sell to customers during the Covid-19 health crisis. But that didn’t slow down the spirits.

Jeff Irons has been making bourbon five years. “I had started this whole distillery figuring I’d be making about five gallons a week,” he told me. It was a hobby, a part time gig. Jeff smiled and said, “I immediately found out that at five gallons a week, you make negative money to pay for everything. I bumped up to 10 gallons a week, still negative money,” he said laughing. “So now, we’re at 30 gallons a week.”

That’s enough to fill two 15-gallon barrels. “It’s about 90ish bottles per week,” he said, “A hundred bottles a week is what I’m filling.”

There are two stories behind why he wanted to start making his own whiskey. “One is, it seemed like a good idea at the time, just five gallons a week, that can’t be that hard which turned out to not be true at all,” he said smiling.

The second is, he wanted to make sure he was doing it legally. “I didn’t want to have the ABC and the feds kickin’ up my steps and getting busted for making illegal hooch in the backyard,” he said with a laugh.

Jeff’s full-time job is with NASA. “I work on the space launch system, the SLS program in strategic communications,” Jeff said. That has come in handy with his business. “Even though I’m an aerospace engineer, I’ve been marketing guy my whole career,” he told me.

A friend helped him with the logo and branding. Irons Distillery is a family operation. It’s Jeff and his wife. He’s the master distiller. But she has the best job of all after the whiskey ages. “When my wife who is the chief tasting officer approves it, then we bottle it,” he said.

She apparently has a better palette. “Yeah, exactly,” he said smiling, ”I made the mistake of bottling 90 bottles back in the day and the CTO was not happy, so I emptied 90 bottles back to the barrels.” It has to pass her taste buds test before being bottled and sold.

It takes a week from mixing the mash to getting it off the still. It then sits in oak charred barrels for two years. “The alcohol when I get it out of the barrels is probably around 115, 118 proof and then basically I cut that down with distilled water down to 90 proof,” Jeff said.

Jeff Irons is Alabama’s seventh distiller. “I thought the name Old Number 7 would be pretty good, but I think that would last about five seconds before I got a cease and desist notice from the guys up north here,” he said with a chuckle.

Good decision. “I make 30 gallons a week,” Jeff said, “Jack Daniels makes 50 gallons a minute on one of eight continuously running stills.” He’s happy being the little guy. “I am good at where it is right now at this level and it’s probably up to somebody else to come on in and grow it to the next level if they want to,” he added.

Jeff didn’t get into making whiskey to make money. He did it to create a spirit that people would enjoy. “Exactly, and that’s been a lot of fun,” he said, “The whole goal was to make a whiskey for our community.” And we can all drink to that.

To find out when Jeff’s next batch of Irons One Whiskey will be ready for sale, you can follow him on the Irons Distillery Facebook page. But you might want to check the page frequently. It takes a couple of years to make, but only a few minutes to sell out.


Cool and dry Monday morning, humidity returns Monday afternoon!

The drier airmass that has moved into the Tennessee Valley this weekend has brought a rare gift this time of year: low humidity!

This resulted in morning lows in the mid 50s on Sunday morning, and a repeat is likely again Monday morning.

Clear skies and a like, northeasterly wind will facilitate a big time cool down into the mid 50s once again for much of the Tennessee Valley, and a few “cool spots” in south Tennessee may drop into the low 50s before sunrise.

Monday afternoon marks “the end” of the comfortable weather, as a change in the wind brings the humidity back into the Tennessee Valley.

Good bye, dry air!

High pressure anchored over the Great Lakes continues to push cool, dry air over the Appalachian Mountains and into the Tennessee Valley through early Monday afternoon.

However, by Monday evening, that high will be centered over the Eastern Seaboard, opening the door for humid air to return to north Alabama and south Tennessee.

You’ll notice the “muggy” feel in the air creeping in after lunchtime Monday, but by Tuesday and Wednesday, it will be in full force.

Rain chances remain limited, though, due to a lack of a “triggering” mechanism to fire off any showers or thunderstorms until late next week, when a weak front stalls near the area.

Nineties in our future

May 2020 will finish up with an unusual stat: The official thermometers at Huntsville International Airport never reached 90 degrees this month. Huntsville’s record books go back to 1907, but since that time, the city has failed to record a 90 degree May Day only 36 times in the past 113 years.

We’re likely to hit 90ºF at least once or twice next week, but this is the first time we’ve not officially had a May 90-degree high temperature in Huntsville since 2003.


Local Emergency Order: 9:00 p.m. Curfew & Downtown Access Closed

While two peaceful protests & marches took place today, a local emergency order was issued for Athens-Clarke County with a curfew of 9:00 p.m. & downtown access closed to provide continued safety for residents & property. Full order: accgov.com/news.


Middlesex Barracks – DLS

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A302179 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Tpr. Crista Maurice                            STATION: Middlesex Barracks                    CONTACT#: 229-9191   DATE/TIME: 05/31/2020, 1803 hours INCIDENT LOCATION: US RT 2, near Muddy Brook Rd, E. Montpelier


Homicide: 2500 Block of Elvans Road, Southeast

Sunday, May 31, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch are investigating a homicide that occurred on Sunday, May 31, 2020, in the 2500 block of Elvans Road, Southeast.

 

At approximately 1:02 pm, members of the Seventh District responded to the listed location for the report of a shooting. Upon arrival, officers located an adult male, suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene and transported the victim to a local hospital for treatment. After all life-saving efforts failed, the victim was pronounced dead.

 

The decedent has been identified as 25 year-old Richard Mitchell, of Oxon Hill, MD.

 

The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up to $25,000 to anyone that provides information which leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for any homicide committed in the District of Columbia. Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the police at 202-727-9099. Additionally, anonymous information may be submitted to the department’s TEXT TIP LINE by sending a text message to 50411.


Man charged with arson in Nashville courthouse fire

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — A suspect has been arrested for setting fire to Nashville’s historic Metro Courthouse on Saturday night.

Metro Police along with SWAT officers arrested 25-year-old Wesley Somers on charges of felony arson, vandalism, and disorderly conduct.

Somers was arrested at a home on Manzano Road in Madison. Members of the community led to his identification and subsequent arrest. He will be booked into Metro Jail shortly.

The investigation into the arson attack at the courthouse and other vandalism is continuing.

Anyone with information is asked to call Nashville Crime Stoppers at 615-74-CRIME or you can submit a tip onlineby clicking here.


Calgarians rally against racism after George Floyd’s death

Calgarians gathered in Fish Creek Provincial Park on Sunday to speak out about racism following the death of a black man in the U.S. nearly a week ago.


Homicide: 1400 Block of Fairmont Street, Northwest

Sunday, May 31, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch are investigating a homicide that occurred on Monday, May 25, 2020, in the 1400 block of Fairmont Street, Northwest.

 

At approximately 6:21 pm, members of the Third District responded to the listed location for the sound of gunshots. Upon arrival, officers located two adult males, unconscious and unresponsive, suffering from gunshot wounds. DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene and transported one of the victims to an area hospital for treatment. After all life-saving efforts failed, the victim was pronounced dead. The second victim was also transported to an area hospital for treatment of life-threatening injuries and is in critical condition.

The decedent was identified as 22-year-old Christopher Beckwith, Jr., of Northwest, DC.

On Saturday, May 30, 2020, the second victim succumbed to his injuries and has been identified as 19-year-old Willie Leon Brown, Jr. of Northwest, DC.

The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up to $25,000 to anyone that provides information which leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for any homicide committed in the District of Columbia. Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the police at 202-727-9099. Additionally, anonymous information may be submitted to the department’s TEXT TIP LINE by sending a text message to 50411.


Inslee activates additional National Guard at request of King County

Gov. Jay Inslee today activated up to 200 more members of the Washington National Guard in response to a request from King County to help Bellevue respond to looting and to protect against property damage and manage crowds and traffic throughout the county if necessary.


Protesters vandalize confederate monument in Birmingham

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — Protesters have filled Linn Park in Birmingham, Ala.

People with signs that read ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘I can’t breathe’ chanted George Floyd’s name calling for justice in his death.

Around 8 p.m., protesters began taking down the boards around the confederate monument that stands tall at Linn Park. Protesters with spray paint began writing on the monument.

WATCH



LIVE BLOG: “We Still Can’t Breathe” march in Mobile Sunday afternoon starting at Mardi Gras Park

UPDATE (6:12 PM) — Protesters question Mayor Sandy Stimpson on his late arrival to the protest.

UPDATE (5:44 PM) – Mobile Police Chief Battiste speaks with protesters in Mardi Gras Park.

UPDATE (5:32 PM) — Director Barber instructs officers to move in to push the crowd out from the interstate.

UPDATE (5:24 PM) — News 5’s Brianna Hollis is at the silent vigil to honor Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd.

UPDATE (5:19 PM) — Mobile Public Safety Director Barber spoke to News 5 saying they want to facilitate a peaceful protest. He continues to say that due to safety concerns, protesters must remove themselves from the interstate but if they’d like to return to Mardi Gras Park they’re more than welcome to do so.

UPDATE (5:10 PM) — Protesters and authorities attempt to have a peaceful discussion to alleviate the tension.

UPDATE (5:06 PM) — A cop car’s window was broken in response to the dispersed tear gas.

UPDATE (4:56 PM) — The police have released tear gas into the crowd of protesters.

UPDATE (4:54 PM) — “We Still Can’t Breathe” march is still in progress on I-10, police in gear have approached the interstate.

UPDATE (4:35 PM) — News 5 had the chance to speak to a man regarding an incident where protesters claimed he pulled out his gun.

Here’s his side of the story:

The man proclaims, “All Lives Matter,” a phrase that most African Americans feel only dilutes the intent of “Black Lives Matter.”

UPDATE (4:26 PM) — A silent vigil to honor Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd is set to begin at 5 p.m. on Cathedral Square in Downtown Mobile.

UPDATE (4:15 PM) — Chief Battiste spoke to News 5 regarding his encounter with a man equipped with an AR-15 rifle at Sunday’s protest. When asked to secure his rifle, Chief Battiste says the young man willingly complied.

UPDATE (4:01 PM) — Protesters joined in taking a knee, a movement that shook the sports industry back in 2016 to bring awareness to police brutality against African Americans.

UPDATE (3:47 PM) — A heated discussion erupts in the crowd, but is quickly deescalated with a group hug. A protester shouts, “It’s about education!”

UPDATE (3:42 PM) — It’s quite evident that there are conflicting philosophies amongst those protesting, while some want to “fight back,” others just want peace.

UPDATE (3:31 PM) — A protester encourages African Americans to go out and vote. She says that if we truly want a change, we need to remove these problematic figures from our office.

UPDATE (3:27 PM) — African American citizens question whether or not officers are actually doing what they were sworn in to do, and that’s protect no matter race or creed.

UPDATE (3:00PM) — A woman expresses her own secondhand experience with police brutality taking the life of her brother, Ray Anson Mitchell who died in 2013.

Officers reported that they received a call about a suspect prowling in a Mobile neighborhood on  Bonneville Drive. They proceeded to use a taser on 37-year-old Mitchell and that is when he became “combative” as they say he wrestled that taser out of the officer’s hand and proceeded to use it.

Deadly force was then used, as Mitchell was gunned down and his life was lost.

She states, “I’m tired of hatred…”

UPDATE (2:46 PM) — Protesters speak out about fighting back against the continuous oppression facing the African American community.

Some feel as though this needs to be handled “by any means necessary,” others say we need to take a more economically strategic approach to dismantle the oppression.

UPDATE (2:41 PM) — People start to gather at Mardi Gras Park to begin the protest for George Floyd and countless of other African Americans who have disproportionately lost their lives due to police brutality.

UPDATE: WKRG News 5’s Rose Ann Haven and Peter Albrecht will have LIVE breaking news coverage on WKRG.com and on the WKRG Facebook page.

MOBILE, Ala. (WKRG) — A community group in Mobile is planning an event Sunday afternoon in light of the George Floyd protests. A group called “Mobile For Us” is organizing a march from Mardi Gras Park to the Dauphin Street Police Precint. It starts at 3 Sunday afternoon.

WATCH FULL COVERAGE OF THE MARCH HERE

It’s called “We Still Can’t Breathe: Mobile’s Call to Action.” According to an event post organizers say “We have very few channels to fight for ourselves. Disrupting the system that built this is the only way for our suffering to end.” They describe it as a socially distant march and are asking people to bring a mask as well. As of early Sunday morning, more than 200 people on Facebook marked themselves as going.

View this gallery full of images from the protest:

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Decatur Target closes early due to social media threat of looting

DECATUR, Ala –  A Target in Decatur boarded up its front doors, windows and closed early Sunday night out of an abundance of caution, according to the store’s director.

Morgan County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Mike Swafford said the flier for a peaceful protest was altered to encourage looting at the Decatur Target Sunday at 8 p.m.

Morgan County deputies and Decatur police will be monitoring the situation throughout the night. Our crew did not see any other stores with boarded-up windows in the area.

Earlier in the day, hundreds gathered at the Morgan County Courthouse for a peaceful protest in response to George Floyd’s death.

The decision to close the Decatur store early Sunday night comes as Target is temporarily closing dozens of its stores in the United States as protests continue to erupt across the country. 

Stores across Minnesota, California, New York, Illinois, Georgia, Colorado, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Texas have closed their doors. You can get a full list of closures here.


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Atlanta, GA (WGCL) — Two Atlanta police officers who tased and pulled two Atlanta University Center students from a car on Saturday night have been terminated.

Three other officers were placed on desk duty pending further investigation. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms made the announcement during a press conference on Sunday.

“After review of that footage, Chief Shields and I have made the determination that two of the officers involved in the incident last night will be terminated immediately. The other three officers are, right now, are on desk duty pending further determination of what, if any, appropriate disciplinary action should be taken against them,” the mayor said.

Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields also spoke at the press conference, echoing the mayor’s comments. Shields started by commending the Atlanta Police Department and other law enforcement agencies on the job they’ve done thus far, acknowledging the challenges they’ve faced.

“We have been handed an enormous obstacle and have by and large, done it as well as we could in the space that we’re being afforded,” Shields said. “It’s an unpleasant space to be in but that does not relieve us of our responsibilities. And we have a responsibility, when we handle any incident, to not escalate the incident and not cause further harm or injury,” she said.

CBS46 cameras were rolling as Messiah Young, 22, and Teniyah Pilgrim, 20, were taken into custody after 9 p.m. Saturday night. Young is a student at Morehouse College, and Pilgrim attends Spelman College.

The couple was leaving the protest at Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park in their car at the time. The video shows police smashing the driver’s side window, opening the passenger side door, and tasing the couple before pulling them from the vehicle. It is unclear what led to the arrests.

Pilgrim was detained and later released at the scene without charges. Young was taken to Grady hospital and released Sunday morning. He was initially charged with fleeing the scene and driving with an expired license, but those charges were later dropped.

Morehouse College released this statement on Sunday: “Morehouse College respects and supports the right of peaceful protest, and we expect that our students will be protected as they exercise that right. While we cannot comment on an ongoing investigation, we echo the call for justice for George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. Our thoughts and prayers are with their families.”


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