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Coronavirus: Additional death reported at Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home, total at 24

Twenty-three residents have now died at Pinecrest Nursing Home, as well as a spouse of a resident.


Coronavirus in Colorado, April 5: A look at the latest updates on COVID-19

As of today, 126 people in Colorado have died from the novel coronavirus as hospitalizations near 900.

The ventilator and PPE shortage continues to worsen. The federal government swooped up Colorado’s order of 500 ventilators, among other supplies, on Friday. Gov. Jared Polis spoke to CNN about the frustrations he feels about competing with other states to get supplies while now also competing with the federal government. Meanwhile, Colorado hospitals are preparing for the worst case scenario of a ventilator shortage.

As more and more Coloradans become infected — the Saturday report totals 4,565 cases — we are hearing from them about what it feels like to have COVID-19. For those that haven’t gotten sick, they are figuring out how to celebrate life’s big moments from afar.

Remember, all Coloradans have been asked to wear non-medical masks when outside their homes to prevent the spread of coronavirus. Want to know how to make one? There’s plenty of ideas floating around in our coronavirus-focused Facebook group.

We are also looking to hear from you. Tell us what the coronavirus outbreak looks like for you and submit your story here.

Throughout the day, we will share the latest coverage from Denver Post journalists on the coronavirus outbreak on this page.

Here are the previous days’ updates: April 4, 3

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Residents in Lakewood neighborhood asked to shelter in place

Lakewood Police asked residents near the intersection of W. 32nd Avenue and Routt Street to shelter in place Sunday morning while the SWAT team responded to a barricaded suspect inside a home.

Police asked residents to stay inside and asked others to avoid the area around 9:15 a.m.

No additional information was immediately available.


The West Block — Episode 31, Season 10

Watch the full broadcast of 'The West Block' from Sunday, April 5, 2020 with Mike Le Couteur.


Ex-NFL kicker, Saints hero Tom Dempsey dies at 73

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Former NFL kicker Tom Dempsey, who played in the NFL despite being born without toes on his kicking foot and made a record 63-yard field goal, died late Saturday while struggling with complications from the new coronavirus, his daughter said. He was 73 years old.

The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate first reported Dempsey’s death. Ashley Dempsey said Sunday that her father, who has resided in an assisted living home for several years after being diagnosed with dementia, tested positive for the coronavirus a little more than a week ago.

The Orleans Parish coroner has yet to release an official cause of death.

Dempsey’s game-winning field goal against Detroit on Nov. 8, 1970, stood as an NFL record for 43 years until the Broncos’ Matt Prater broke it with a 64-yarder in Denver in 2013.

Dempsey spent 11 seasons in the NFL: His first two seasons were with New Orleans (1969-70), the next four with Philadelphia, then two with the Los Angeles Rams, one with the Houston Oilers and the final two with Buffalo. He retired after the 1979 season.

“Tom’s life spoke directly to the power of the human spirit and exemplified his resolute determination to not allow setbacks to impede following his dreams and aspirations,” Saints owner Gayle Benson said in a statement. “He exemplified the same fight and fortitude in recent years as he battled valiantly against illnesses but never wavered and kept his trademark sense of humor.”

Dempsey was born in Milwaukee without four fingers on his right hand and without toes on his right foot. He kicked straight on with a flat-front shoe that drew protests from some who saw the specially made kicking shoe as an unfair advantage. Former Dallas Cowboys President Tex Schramm compared the shoe to “the head of a golf club.”

But Dempsey would counter that by saying he was merely doing the best he could to use the foot with which he was born, and for the most part, NFL officials, including then-Commissioner Pete Rozelle, agreed. Still, in 1977, the NFL passed what is widely known as the “The Dempsey Rule,” mandating that shoes worn by players with “an artificial limb on his kicking leg must have a kicking surface that conforms to that of a normal kicking shoe.”

Dempsey returned to New Orleans after retiring from the league. About seven years ago, he was diagnosed with dementia and later moved to an assisted living home, where he contracted the coronavirus in March during the pandemic that has hit the city — and nursing home — particularly hard. He is survived by wife Carlene, three children, a sister and grandchildren.

His kick has remained part of Saints lore and for a long time stood as one of the greatest moments in the history of a franchise that didn’t make the playoffs until its 21st season in 1987, and didn’t win a playoff game until the 2000 season.

At the time of the kick, the Superdome had yet to be build and the Saints played home games in the old Tulane Stadium, which was demolished in 1979.

The Lions led 17-16 after a short field goal with 11 seconds left.

With no timeouts, the Saints managed to move the ball to their own 45 with 2 seconds left after Billy Kilmer completed a pass to Al Dodd along the sideline.

According to a media reports, special teams coach Don Heinrich was heard barking, “Tell Stumpy to get ready to go in and kick a long one.”

At that time, goalposts were on the goal line, not behind the end zone. The spot of the kick was the Saints 37.

“I was more concerned about kicking it straight because I felt I could handle the distance,” Dempsey told the Times-Picayune. “I knew I was going to get a perfect snap from Jackie Burkett and a perfect hold from Joe Scarpati. It was all up to me. I hit it sweet.”

Kilmer told the Times-Picayune he remembers standing on the sideline seeing Lions players across the field laughing as Dempsey lined up for the momentous kick.

“They thought Tom had no chance,” Kilmer said.

But Dempsey ended up carried off the field on the shoulders of teammates and recalled spending all night at a Bourbon Street bar, celebrating.

“We were there, with all the guys, until the wee hours,” he said. “From what I can recall, I had a great time.”

Both the shoe with which Dempsey kicked the 63-yarder and the ball are in the Saints Hall of Fame in New Orleans, into which Dempsey was inducted in 1989. The Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, has another of Dempsey’s specially made kicking shoes, but Dempsey wanted the mementos of the record-breaking kick to remain in New Orleans.


Authorities search for two teenagers who escaped Mount View Youth Services Center

Two teenagers remained on the run Sunday after escaping from Mount View Youth Services Center Saturday night.

Authorities are searching for Emilio Domingues and Eduardo Ruelas, both 17, who assaulted a staff member and escaped the center at 7862 Mansfield Parkway around 8 p.m. Saturday, Jefferson County Sheriff’s spokesman Mike Taplin said.

The staff member was treated at a hospital for injuries that were not life-threatening, Taplin said. Taplin believed the pair, both who were being held on felony charges, escaped by jumping a fence. The two teenagers were wearing uniforms but authorities believe they have since changed clothes.

Anyone who sees the teenagers is asked to call 911.

Domingues previously escaped Lookout Mountain Youth Services Center in May 2019 and was recaptured after a day. At the time, authorities described Domingues, whose name they spelled Dominguez, as a violent sex offender with gang ties.

After he was caught in 2019, authorities said Domingues would be booked into the Mount View Youth Services Center on charges of reckless driving, felony eluding, criminal mischief and escape.

 


YMCA offering free full-day child care for first responders, medical personnel and essential workers

Daycare

In partnership with the State Emergency Childcare Collaborative, the YMCA of Metro Denver is offering free full-day child care (ages 5 to 14) Mondays through Fridays from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. The program is for critical use only — for first responders, medical personnel or essential workers who need child care in order to work and support their families. Kids will enjoy arts, crafts, games and movies, all under supervision from experienced staff. In addition, kids will sanitize hands upon arrival and throughout the day. In addition, the staff and registered nurses will monitor children and look for symptoms of COVID-19. Plus, the facilities will be cleaned throughout the day. Children should bring a non-perishable lunch. For complete details, including locations and registration, visit denverymca.org/emergency-childcare.

Greetings, my friend

It’s a good time to reconnect with friends and family, and Hallmark can help. The go-to shop for greeting cards is giving away 2 million cards in the hopes of encouraging people to send notes of love and encouragement during these uncertain times. The company is giving away a free three-pack of cards online (including shipping). Sign up to get your complimentary cards at greetings.hallmark.com/careenough. The cards should arrive in the mail within a week or so. Limit one pack per person, while supplies last.

Playroom

Kids can get bored very quickly, especially when they’re stuck indoors. To help, toymaker Mattel is opening its doors for some online playtime. The new Mattel Playroom is a free online resource, featuring fun activities and content from the company’s iconic portfolio of brands. Kids will enjoy all their favorites, including American Girl, Barbie, Fisher-Price, Hot Wheels, Thomas & Friends and more. The site also gives parents easy access to content from its brands, including printable coloring pages, puzzles, activities and ready-to-play games. The site will be updated weekly with new content and activities.

Colorado gear

Who says you can’t go on an Easter egg hunt? (Even better, these eggs contain big savings). This year, Denver-based Aksels is moving its popular Eggs-travaganza Sale online, from March 28 to April 8. And there are plenty of rewards for those who go hunting. Simply hover over any product image online and, if an egg appears, you’ve found one, and can get 40 percent off that item. Find the Golden Egg and get that item for free. To get the savings, you must purchase $20 or more in products. During this time of isolation and social distancing, the company is offering free shipping, too. Happy hunting.

Hero’s welcome

Hospital workers are heroes. There are many ways to thank them for their hard work, courage and kindness — and free food is a good place to start. Local owners and operators of McDonald’s in Colorado are thanking “all the men and women who put their own lives on the line every day and are serving those affected by this global pandemic” with complimentary food. Until April 30, hospital workers can get a free combo meal of their choice at the drive-thru. Limit one per person, with an employee ID or badge. Not all locations are participating. However, there are more than 90 locations throughout Colorado offering the giveaway. For a complete list of participating locations, visit milehighonthecheap.com/mcdonalds-free-combo-hospital-workers-colorado.

Daily grind

Starbucks is offering a complimentary tall brewed coffee (hot or iced) to any customer who identifies as a front-line responder to the COVID-19 outbreak until May 3. If your tastes are more local, Ziggi’s Coffee is pouring one free drink per day for doctors, nurses and first responders until April 11. The offer includes any menu drink in any size (bottled beverages are excluded). Both chains continue to serve beverages from the drive-thru, as a means of protecting customers and staff.

Sweet dreams

Parents working 9 to 5 from home will now have some star-powered help from Dolly Parton in getting the kids to go to bed. Starting April 2, the country superstar will read bedtime stories to the little ones in a new virtual series called “Goodnight with Dolly.” The 10-week series will focus on comforting and reassuring children during this chaotic time for families. The stories will be streamed on Facebook Live  every Thursday at 5 p.m. and will be available for replay on various platforms. The series will feature many titles from Parton’s Imagination Library charity, which has given away more than 100 million books. 

Mmm … doughnuts!

Krispy Kreme is making these tough days a little sweeter. Until May 11, the shop is providing health care workers with free doughnuts every Monday. The offer is available to physicians, nurses, surgeons, psychologists, dentists, optometrists, pharmacists and their staffs. The limit will vary from one to five dozen original glazed doughnuts, based on production capabilities and product availability at each location. For the rest of us, the shop is spreading some kindness every Saturday. The chain’s Be Sweet Saturdays adds a free dozen original glazed doughnuts to every drive-thru, pick-up or delivery order that includes a full-priced original glazed dozen. The hope is that customers will share the complimentary dozen with someone who needs a little cheering up.

Farmers market

Non-perishable foods may not always be the healthiest of options, so fresh fruit and vegetables are a welcome addition to any diet. Boulder County Farmers Market (BCFM) is connecting local farmers with the community, when getting produce at the grocery store can be a challenge. To meet the demand for fresh produce, BCFM will debut a robust virtual market with online ordering, starting the week of April 19 — with curbside pickup at the Boulder County Fairgrounds in Longmont on Saturdays beginning April 25. Curbside pickup will be available at other locations (Boulder, Union Station and Lafayette) in the following weeks. The organization also has a round-up of the offerings of nearly 30 of its member farms, including farms ready to sell produce immediately via farm stand, retail locations and online ordering (both for pick-up and delivery).

Every month, Laura Daily and Bryan K. Chavez at MileHighOnTheCheap.com compile “Cheap Checklist” to help smart shoppers find freebies, discounts and deals. Send tips to info@milehighonthecheap.com 14 to 21 days in advance.

 


Virtual Grand National raises £2.6m for NHS Charities Together

Saturday’s Virtual Grand National, won by Potters Corner, raises more than £2.6m for NHS Charities Together.


Alabama Department of Public Health answers questions regarding stay-at-home order

We’ve received many questions since the statewide stay-at-home order went into effect Saturday, April 4 at 5 p.m.

The Alabama Department of Public Health has released a pair of documents to help individuals and businesses understand the order.

  1. May I do X, Y, or Z?
    The answer depends on the language of the state health order. But before asking whether you can legally do X, Y, or Z, ask yourself, “Is doing X, Y, or Z a good idea?” If doing X, Y, or Z would increase the risk of transmitting COVID-19, try not to do it.
  2. When can I leave my home?
    You may leave home only to do “essential activities” allowed by the order. For example, you can go get “necessary” services or supplies, and you can help other people (or pets!) get these necessary services or supplies. You can also go to work in some circumstances. There are a few other “essential activities” listed in the order; most are addressed in some way on this FAQ.
  3. What are “necessary” supplies or services?
    The order gives several examples of necessary services and supplies—for example, food, pharmaceuticals, gas for your car, and emergency medical care. In each case, the services and
    supplies must be “necessary” for a person’s (or a pet’s) safety, sanitation, or daily routine. But
    remember: Always ask yourself whether going somewhere, even for “necessary” supplies and
    services, would increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission. If you can delay, delay.
  4. Can I go to church? What about weddings and funerals?
    Yes, you may attend these services, but only in limited circumstances. A service can proceed in person if it involves fewer than 10 people spaced at least six
    feet apart from one another. Or, it can be a “drive-in” service where people remain in cars with other people from their household—spaced six feet away from people in other cars. To help prevent COVID-19 transmission, every effort should be made to conduct these services through remote participation.
  5. What can I do outside? Can I play golf or tennis? Can I take my children to the playground? What about boating, hunting, and fishing?
    Generally, you may go outside as long as you stay six feet apart from other people—and never congregate in a group of 10 or more people. But some outside activities are specifically prohibited—including spectator sports, sports that involve interaction
    within 6 feet of another person, activities that require the use of shared equipment, and commercial or public playground equipment. In short, keep exercising and go outside—but avoid activities that increase the risk of spreading COVID-19.
  6. Am I allowed to leave home for work?
    Yes. You may go to work if your workplace is one of the many “essential businesses and operations” listed in the order. Even if your work is not listed as “essential,” you may also go to work if doing so would allow your employer to “maintain” its value (for example, providing security or managing inventory), or if doing so would allow other people to work or shop remotely (including drive-by, curbside, and delivery), or if doing so would require no regular interaction within six feet of another person.
  7. What about cleaning services, remodeling crews, home health workers, and lawn services? In other words, can people come to my home to provide services?
    It depends. As mentioned above in question 6, people can go to work for an “essential” business or if they will have no regular interaction within six feet of another person. So it may be legal to provide some of these services at your home, especially
    lawn services. (“Home health workers and aides” are specifically listed as essential.) But always ask, “is this a good idea”? If you can delay the service, delay it.
  8. May I leave my home to transfer custody of my children? What about visiting family?
    Yes, the order allows people to leave home to travel as required by court order, including specifically the “transportation of children as required by a custody agreement.” You may also visit family, as long as it’s at their place of residence.
  9. When I do leave home, does it matter how I travel? Can I travel by bus? What about airlines?
    The order does not prohibit any method of travel. But remember: You should make every effort to avoid situations that increase the risk of spreading COVID-19.
  1. May I do X, Y, or Z?
    The answer depends on the language of the state health order. But before asking whether you can legally do X, Y, or Z, ask yourself, “Is doing X, Y, or Z a good idea?” If doing X, Y, or Z would increase the risk of transmitting COVID-19, try not to do it.
  2. May I continue operating my business?
    It depends. Under the order, people may leave home for certain work-related reasons, such as to work for one of the many listed “essential business and operations.” People can also leave home to help any business “maintain” its value (e.g., security, payroll, inventory), to enable other people to work or shop remotely (including curbside pickup or delivery), or if their work requires no regular interaction within six feet of another person. Some businesses, however—the entertainment venues, athletic facilities, and “close-contact” service providers listed in paragraph 5—are specifically closed to nonemployees.
  3. How do I know if a business or operation may continue operating as “essential”?
    Please refer to the list of essential businesses and operations in paragraph 2 of the order. Note especially that paragraph 2 incorporates this list of essential infrastructure from the federal government.
  4. What if I operate a store that is not an “essential” business or operation, but the store is not specifically ordered to close—for example, furniture stores, clothing stores, beauty supply stores, or tobacco stores. May I continue operating my store? May I at least offer curbside pickup or delivery?
    See FAQ #2 above, as well as paragraph 1 of the order allowing people to leave home to get “necessary” services and supplies. Taken together, these rules can be boiled down to this: “You can always deliver. And if the customer can leave their house for it, you can meet them at the curb.”
  5. What if my business provides services but is not on the “essential” list and is not specifically closed—for example, pet groomers, home cleaning services, or lawn services? May I continue operating my business?
    It depends. As mentioned above in FAQ #2, people can leave home to work if they will have no regular interaction within six feet of another person. So home cleaning services and lawn services conceivably may continue to operate. If you provide a service that requires customers to leave their homes, remember that they may leave only to get “necessary” services as defined in paragraph 1 of the order.
  6. May I change my business model to become an “essential” business or operation?
    Yes, if your business truly becomes an essential business or operation. But if you try to circumvent the order without fully becoming an essential business or operation, then you are in violation of the order and will face criminal liability.
  7. If I may continue operating my business, what steps must I take to protect customers and employees?
    Essential businesses and operations must take “all reasonable steps” to avoid gatherings of 10 or more persons. They also must take “all reasonable steps” to keep customers and employees six feet apart from one another. Beyond that, “essential retailers”—for example, grocery stores, pharmacies, and “big box” stores—must implement a 50% “emergency maximum occupancy rate,” keep customers six feet apart, and follow sanitation guidelines from public health authorities. For details, see paragraph 6 of the order. And remember: Even if your business may continue operating, you are always encouraged to go above and beyond the requirements of the order to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  8. May I continue operating my childcare center?
    Child day care facilities may continue to operate if 12 or more children are not allowed in a room or other enclosed space at the same time. These facilities are encouraged to use enhanced sanitation and social distancing practices consistent with guidance from the
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Alabama Department of Public Health.
  9. If I may continue operating my business, will the government provide my employees “credentials” to allow them to go to and from work?
    No, the government will not be issuing credentials. But you can do so, if you would like to. The decision whether to issue credentials to your employees is left up to you.

Canada’s coronavirus response can shift economy’s direction to low-carbon: experts

Analysts are saying that Canada could hasten its recovery and position itself for a low-carbon economy by the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Coronavirus: Grand Valley inmates in Kitchener on lockdown over infections, guards union says

The union representing guards says at least four inmates of Grand Valley Institution in Kitchener, Ont., are infected.


Kyle Walker: Manchester City defender faces investigation over lockdown breach

Kyle Walker faces disciplinary action from Manchester City after reportedly breaking lockdown rules by hosting a party involving two sex workers.


Coronavirus: Montreal closes certain public spaces due to crowding

As of Sunday morning, cases in the province are at 6,997, with 74 fatalities and 478 hospitalizations.


Coronavirus: Canada’s border communities adapt as COVID-19 crisis deepens

As the global coronavirus pandemic worsens south of the border, the crossings that tie communities on either side together are starting to represent fear.


Coronavirus: Canada’s border communities adapt as COVID-19 crisis deepens

As the global coronavirus pandemic worsens south of the border, the crossings that tie communities on either side together are starting to represent fear.


Ontario reports 408 new coronavirus cases, 25 deaths as total cases top 4,000

Sunday's increase marks an 11.2 per cent increase in cases, compared to 11.5 per cent on Saturday and 16.5 per cent on Friday.


Denver weather: Sunny skies and warm temps start mild week

Sunshine and warm weather is in store for the Denver region Sunday, kicking off a mild and pleasant few days.

High temperatures will hover in the high 60s and low 70s throughout the region Sunday through Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service at Boulder, with mostly sunny skies.

The weather will likely take a turn Wednesday night, with possible rain and snow showers, and then will stay cooler and more damp for the rest of the week, according to the weather service.

The region will see highs in the mid 50s and low 60s on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, according to the weather service, with a slight chance of rain or snow showers each day.


Ex-NFL kicker, Saints hero Tom Dempsey dies at 73

Former NFL kicker Tom Dempsey, who played in the NFL despite being born without toes on his kicking foot and made a record 63-yard field goal, died late Saturday while … Click to Continue »


Rwanda locates genocide grave that could contain up to 30,000 bodies

The discovery is being called the most significant in years, and 50 bodies have been exhumed so far in efforts that are challenged by the East African nation's coronavirus-related lockdown.


Rwanda locates genocide grave that could contain up to 30,000 bodies

The discovery is being called the most significant in years, and 50 bodies have been exhumed so far in efforts that are challenged by the East African nation's coronavirus-related lockdown.


Trudeau to offer update on Canada’s coronavirus pandemic response

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to provide an update on his government's response to the novel coronavirus outbreak on Sunday.


Trudeau to offer update on Canada’s coronavirus pandemic response

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to provide an update on his government's response to the novel coronavirus outbreak on Sunday.


Seafood industry struggling to stay afloat amid outbreak

The seafood industry has been upended by the spread of the coronavirus, which has halted sales in restaurants and sent fishermen and dealers scrambling for new markets. Seafood is a … Click to Continue »


It will take more than just a vaccine to fight coronavirus

The world is in a frantic race to develop a vaccine for Covid-19, but it also needs to do some serious soul-searching as to whether a vaccine is the be-all and end-all to combat this devastating pandemic.

Just as finding a medical solution is crucial, so is the need for solidarity and cooperation instead of finger pointing and gloating over others’ suffering. And this need has become critical for whatever meaningful joint efforts can be made by China and the US against a common enemy.

If the…


Coronavirus: National garden camp-out raises £80k for NHS

People slept in tents, camper vans and in their living rooms in the Great British Camp-Out.


Authorities responding to possibly deadly fire in Falkville

FALKVILLE, Ala. – Multiple crews were called to a fire in Morgan County Sunday morning.

According to a tweet from the Sheriff’s Office, crews were called to the 1900-block of Highway 55 East around 8:15 a.m.

The Sheriff’s Office stated the coroner has been called for “suspected fatalities,” along with the fire marshal.

WHNT News 19 has a crew on the way to the scene and we’ll have updates as we know more.


Coronavirus lockdown: Gallery pieces become online jigsaw puzzles

Paintings from the Cooper Gallery in Barnsley have been transformed into internet puzzle challenges.


Leeds United fans’ deaths in Turkey 20 years ago ‘feels like yesterday’

The brother of a Leeds United fan killed in Turkey says his death is "still fresh in my memory".


Coronavirus: Troops to assemble at CFB Borden to prepare for COVID-19 fight

The troops will then be ready to respond to any requests from the government to help deal with COVID-19 or potential spring flooding.


Churches continue to stream Sunday services online during COVID-19 pandemic

Data pix.

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - Social distancing and stay at home orders are not stopping pastors from reaching millions of households at one time, and there's a boom in church leaders taking their ministries to the world wide web.

If churches aren't live streaming, they're strongly making the effort, and if they're already doing it, then they're ahead of the game.

The Rock Family Worship Center in Huntsville saw its online views triple these past few weeks.
Members who attended church before the pandemic probably didn't engage in the church's online content, but now they're contributing to the growing number of Americans streaming services in the comfort of their own homes.

Pastor Rusty Nelson says not being able to gather has caused his church to redefine how they do ministry.

"The future is - keep your footprint because now you're engaging people who would never walk into the door of your church so you don't want to alleviate that at all. This has been an opportunity."

The Rock Family Worship Center periodically uploads special teachings that you can check out on their website.

So will online viewership continue rising or will it trickle down when the pandemic is over?
The fact is that ministries are focused on spreading the Word of God either way.


Mark Wood: England bowler says it was ‘right thing’ for players to make donation

Fast bowler Mark Wood says it was the “right thing” for England players to make a £500,000 donation to the ECB and selected good causes.


Alabama churches hosting drive-in services with social distancing in mind

Data pix.

WEST BLOCTON, Ala. - Palm Sunday is a day when many Christians would normally make their way to church, but with a stay at home order in place - and social distancing enforced - many churches are streaming online.

However, not all churches have the luxury of streaming online, so they're skipping the internet connection to gather outdoors instead.

Governor Kay Ivey's stay at home order, which went into effect Saturday afternoon, allows churches to host drive-in worship services. Liberty Baptist Church in West Blocton has been doing it for three weeks now. Families must remain in their cars for the entire service to maintain social distance.

Pastor Korie Anderson says his community is small, so this works for them.

"You don't have to get out of your car. We have our keyboardist, minister of music, our drummer, and myself and other ministers. We're there. We're actually having services outside in order to make sure the Word of God is still going forth.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, Pastor Anderson mentioned broadcasting the church services online.

If anything, the pandemic is pushing churches like Liberty to make those technology investments now more than ever.


“Like a phoenix, we are going to ascend from the ashes:” Phoenix cafe owner giving away food

Data pix.

With social distancing a norm across the country, restaurants and cafes are seeing fewer customers face-to-face, but they are still open for business.

Most are selling their food for pick up or drive-thru, but one cafe in Phoenix stopped selling altogether.

Now, the owner is giving away food for free.

Barrio Cafe in Phoenix is serving the public free food every day after 5 p.m. Head Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza decided not to sell her food and beverage and decided to give it away.

"My margaritas to-go in a gallon aren't important right now. I'm worried about my fellow man, especially the sanity part."

Esparza said the food is prepared by volunteers who passed a clean criteria to be inside of the kitchen. The meals are freshly cooked, along with groceries given to the public.

"Giving them groceries, some dignity not having to stand in a soup line or a homeless shelter," said Esparza. "That's what my call is."

Esparza said she tested negative for coronavirus after a February work trip in Europe. Even though she didn't catch it, she knows how the virus that impacted society can take everything from anyone.

"I just lost somebody two days ago that committed suicide," said Esparza. "Everything went down. The marriage was on the rocks. The job was gone, and that person for a moment, coupled with alcohol, just lost it."

That pain keeps her using her kitchen, not for profit, but the community.

"Like a phoenix, we are going to ascend from the ashes."


Wakefield man who failed to claim pension gets £140k payout

The man in his 80s did not realise he was allowed to claim his state pension as he had kept working.


Hope Valley Barracks

No arrests to report.

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov


Zoom weddings and drive-by birthdays: Life’s big moments still find a way in the midst of a pandemic

Bride Erin Hensley, center, and groom ...
Amanda Schultz, Courtesy of the Smith family

Bride Erin Hensley, center, and groom Dustin Smith, right, pose with a cardboard cutout of Erin’s father John Hensley, who could not be present for the couple’s wedding in Bennet on Saturday, March 28, 2020.

You couldn’t wipe the smile off John Hensley’s face as he accompanied his daughter down the aisle of her wedding last weekend if you tried.

Chalk it up to unbridled pride or the fact that he was a cardboard cutout.

Erin Hensley cradled her replica father as she made her way down the dock of a pond on her Bennett property, careful to keep the full skirt of her wedding dress from getting caught under cardboard feet.

She laid her 2-D dad down and stood before groom Dustin Smith, a small gathering of Smith’s family and nearly 40 guests watching from their homes via video-conferencing platform Zoom.

The event wasn’t what the couple envisioned for their big day, but, like so many in Colorado and across the world, the fast-spreading new coronavirus thwarted their plans as governments called on residents to shelter in place to ease the transmission of the respiratory illness.

A pandemic disrupted most aspects of life in in the spring of 2020, but it didn’t chill the warm glow of two hearts about to form a sacred union. It can’t suppress the compliments a brand new prom dress deserves. It won’t quell the triumph in another trip around the sun.

The coronavirus has turned life upside-down, but Coloradans found alternative ways to celebrate in the here-and-now.

Birthday girl

Susie Montoya celebrated her 102st birthday ...
Courtesy of the Montoya family

Susie Montoya

Susie Montoya’s life is bracketed by pandemics.

Born in 1918 as the Spanish flu ravaged the country, Montoya celebrated her 102nd birthday late last monthin quarantine to avoid exposure to COVID-19.

Montoya watched from an upstairs window of her blue, two-story Arvada home as a party took place — with proper distancing — in her driveway and on the street. She wore a crown and a button that read “Birthday Girl” and waved and blew kisses from above to the four generations of Montoyas below holding handmade posters and balloons.

Arvada police officers and firefighters joined the family in serenading Montoya with the “Happy Birthday” song from the street. A fire truck parked in front of the house flashed emergency lights adding to the festivities.

The Arvada mayor and City Council proclaimed it Susie Montoya Day, citing her long life, the value of senior citizens in the community and the inspiration she gives to family and friends.

Montoya raised three sons and three daughters and cleaned houses, granddaughter Michelle Martinez said.

Family, neighbors and members of the ...
Noelle Phillips, The Denver Post

Family, neighbors and members of the Arvada fire and police departments celebrate Susie Montoya turning 102 years old at her home in Arvada on March 27, 2020. Montoya waved from the window of her home.

“We get with her every year and this year’s kind of hard not to be able to hug her and kiss her,” great-great granddaughter Christina Martinez said. “We wanted to do something fun so she could at least see us, let her know we’re here.”

Afterward, granddaughter Gina Leyba called Montoya. The phone call was challenging because of her grandmother’s hearing loss, but Leyba said, “She loved all the attention. Loved seeing everyone. But missed kissing us.”

“Still possible to find life’s little joys”

Montoya had more than 100 years on 3-year-old Maxwell Freed, but the two Colorado residents shared a March 27 birthday.

Twins Maxwell and Riley were supposed to have a raucous toddler bash with 50 friends, a music class, piñata and a visit from beloved cartoon character Peppa Pig.

Mom Amber Freed wanted this birthday to be extra special. Maxwell has a rare neurological condition, SLC6A1, that gets worse after the age of 3.

“Just knowing that this could be his last semi-healthy birthday, we’ve decided to do everything possible to make this the absolute best birthday we can,” Amber Freed said.

Max Freed, 3, left, gives his ...
Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Max Freed, 3, left, gives his twin sister, Riley, a big hug out in front of their home during a social distancing birthday party for both March 27, 2020. Well wishers drove up to the house in southeast Denver at a distance, to wish Max and Riley a happy birthday.

As the parent of a child with a rare disease, Freed was used to being thrown curveballs. The pandemic closed the door on the music studio party, so she opened up her Denver front lawn to passersby last weekend.

The Freeds chalked up the sidewalks of their University Park neighborhood, inviting friends and strangers to drive by and honk for Maxwell and Riley.

The Freed family stood among blow-up lawn decorations — a Halloween dragon, a Thanksgiving turkey, Frosty the snowman, a dinosaur, a rainbow — delighting in the friends, neighbors and newcomers who came to celebrate at a distance.

Dad Mark Freed danced around in a Peter Rabbit costume. Cars filled with kids lined the block, rolling down the street with homemade signs celebrating the birthday boy and girl thrust out the windows. Maxwell and Riley, in matching overalls, watched their parade from the sidewalk. Amber Freed handed out cupcakes and beers to willing visitors with the help of a selfie stick for distancing.

“I think at some point you let go of what you thought should happen and live in what is happening,” she said.  “That means that life is never perfect, but it is still possible to find life’s little joys.”

Rooftop prom

Small joys like the flaunting of a new prom dress from Dillard’s.

Bri Smith loved the way the freckles on her shoulder popped against the deep blue of the dress. The back of the dress was longer, and the front was shorter. One of her shoulders was bare, and the other arm was draped in a dark blue lace.

“I just loved it,” the 18-year-old said. “I loved the way it looks, and I loved the way I looked in it. It’s flowy and fun, and I figured it’s my last year of school. Let’s go all out.”

When the student at Lakewood’s Bear Creek High School realized her senior prom was canceled, she didn’t want the dress to go to waste.

So she took to the roof.


Courtesy of Bri Smith

Bri Smith wore her prom dress for a photoshopped picture.

One of Smith’s remote learning assignments for her photography class required her to edit a picture in a way that gave the illusion of levitation.

She threw on her prom dress, handed her mom the camera and headed out onto their Jefferson County rooftop. The teenager posed with her arms raised out to each side like she was commanding power from within.

“I thought it looked kind of witchy and cool,” Smith said.

The senior edited the picture to look like she and her dress were floating above her home.

“Maybe I didn’t get to wear it to prom and not everyone at school got to see me in it,” she said. “But I did get to wear it. I did get to see myself in it. And I did get to post the picture. The prom dress was seen.”

Back to the basics

So, too, was Erin Hensley’s wedding dress.

Thanks to Denver-based online wedding planning platform Wedfuly, Hensley was able to broadcast her “I do’s” across the country. She got creative with the rest.

When a statewide stay-at-home order prevented Hensley’s hair stylist and makeup artist from coming, her niece stepped in instead. When the virus prevented the caterer from serving the small gathering of family on Hensley’s property, the hunting-loving couple pulled out some elk and deer meat they had stashed in freezers and got to grilling.

Wedfuly is helping couples share their nuptials on Zoom free of charge. The service’s staff makes sure online guests remain muted when appropriate and unmuted when it’s time to cheer.

Caroline Creidenberg, Wedfuly’s CEO, was busy the past few weeks issuing coronavirus-related refunds and rescheduling event venues for her brides and grooms. Offering a free service in a time of need gave her a sense of control in an uncontrollable time — something positive she could do.

“We’re all facing a whole new set of challenges we have to figure out every day,” Creidenberg said. “Being able to do this made me so much happier. And you know what I realized? The couples were still happy, too. The reason people are getting married is they’re celebrating their love with someone. We’re really get back to the basics of that.”


Short on ventilators, Colorado hospitals prepare for a “worst-case scenario” for coronavirus patients

In the worst-case scenario Colorado could be short as many 10,000 ventilators for coronavirus patients, but hospitals and government agencies are trying to avert a situation in which doctors have to make life-or-death decisions about who gets desperately needed care.

When a person has a severe case of COVID-19, the cells that line the lungs’ air sacs start to die, and the lungs begin to fill with fluid, said Dr. Mike Mohning, a pulmonary critical care doctor at National Jewish Health in Denver. Some people can get enough oxygen through a mask or nasal tube, but if that falls short, a ventilator is the best way to keep patients alive long enough for their lungs to heal, he said.

Ventilators not only provide high concentrations of oxygen, but can apply pressure to keep the lungs’ air sacs from collapsing — though the pressure can also damage the lungs, and not all coronavirus patients recover the ability to breathe unassisted.

In harder-hit areas like Italy and New York, doctors have had to choose which patients get that kind of lifesaving treatment because of a shortage of either the machines themselves, or people qualified to run them.

Denver-area hospitals said they had enough machines to care for patients with severe respiratory distress as of last week, but that the situation could quickly change if there’s a surge of patients. UCHealth said it’s trying to increase its ventilator supply, as did SCL Health, which owns Saint Joseph Hospital and Good Samaritan, Lutheran and Platte Valley medical centers.

None of the hospitals shared how many ventilators they have, saying availability is changing frequently. The machines can cost in excess of $10,000 apiece.

Dr. Andrew French, chief medical officer of St. Anthony North, said Centura Health, the hospital system it belongs to, assesses the ventilator supply in its 17 hospitals in Colorado and western Kansas multiple times each day. They consider not only standard ventilators, but also anesthesia machines that could be converted, and devices similar to those used to treat sleep apnea, he said.

“This allows us to assess where we may want to shift resources at a moment’s notice depending upon patients we are seeing,” he said. “We are attempting to proactively plan for the worst-case scenario.”


“We will run out of health staff”

Dr. Ivor Douglas, a pulmonologist and intensive care specialist at Denver Health, said the metro area will be under “tremendous pressure” to provide enough invasive ventilators in the next month, but finding enough people who can operate them could be an even bigger problem. The hospital has sought permission to train students in their final year of medical school to operate ventilators, but so far the Association of American Medical Colleges isn’t allowing that, he said.

“I think that what we will run out of, before we run out of machines, is we will run out of healthy staff,” he said.

Normally, respiratory therapists, pulmonologists or critical care doctors run ventilators, but some hospitals are exploring training others to work under their supervision, said Julie Lonborg, senior vice president of communications at the Colorado Hospital Association. For example, a surgeon who isn’t working because of the ban on elective procedures might be able to assist with caring for patients on ventilators, with back-up from an expert, she said.

Estimates of how many ventilators Colorado would need to avoid wrenching choices vary from as low as 1,041 to as high as 10,000. It’s also not entirely clear how many ventilators might currently be available. The state counts about 900, while the Colorado Hospital Association thinks there are about 1,600, including machines meant for short-term use that could be modified to support patients for weeks.

The number needed will depend on at least three factors: how many people in total develop serious symptoms, how many are sick at the same time and how long they need ventilator support. Lonborg likened it to planning for house guests: you could host 15 guests with one spare bedroom if they spaced out their visits, but not if everyone wanted to come at the same time or if the first guest stayed for a month when you had only planned for a week-long visit.

“The longer the time frame, the more likely we’re going to be able to handle them with the equipment we have,” she said.

So far, the numbers aren’t encouraging when it comes to the length of time that patients will need mechanical support. Scott Bookman, the incident commander coordinating the state’s response to the new virus, said patients may need to be on ventilators for 11 to 20 days. By comparison, most pneumonia or flu patients can breathe on their own within a week, Mohning said.

The number of people who get sick at the same time will depend on how well Coloradans are following the state’s stay-at-home order, Douglas said. If fewer people are interacting and passing germs around at any given time, the odds are better that hospitals will be able to handle the flow of patients.

“We have to double down,” he said. “This is about our social contract with each other.”

Stretching supply, prioritizing patients

Since no one knows exactly how bad the situation could get, everyone is trying to plan for the worse-case scenario, Lonborg said. Unfortunately, that means competing for the limited supply of machines being produced, she said.

“The issue isn’t money. The issue is the supply,” she said.

The state of Colorado is combining hospitals’ orders to speed up the process, because suppliers trust the state will pay its bills and don’t have to consider each facility’s financial situation, Gov. Jared Polis said in a news conference Wednesday. The state has ordered 750 ventilators, though it hadn’t received any yet.

“People fortunately do trust the state of Colorado,” he said.

Bookman said the state is trying to order more ventilators than it anticipates needing, to account for mechanical malfunctions and other problems.

“We want to be prepared to save lives,” he said.

A state task force is working with companies and research institutions to determine if it’s feasible to make ventilators based on publicly available blueprints, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and companies like General Motors and Ford have pledged to retool their factories to produce medical equipment. It’s far from clear if those plans will come through fast enough to meet Colorado’s needs, since projections show cases could peak anywhere between April and July.

Since they don’t know when more machines might arrive, hospitals have started working on plans to move patients or equipment if one area starts to get overwhelmed, Lonborg said. So far, they have enough to care for all COVID-19 patients, but some hospitals have said they could run out of capacity if they get the same number of new patients next week that they have in recent weeks, she said.

There are other ideas to try to stretch the supply, like hooking more than one patient to a single ventilator, but that’s far from ideal, Mohning said. The correct settings for a patient vary based on their size and the level of damage to their lungs, so hospitals would have to try to match patients as closely as possible if they were to share a machine, he said.

“It’ll be a challenge in real life,” he said. “We certainly haven’t come to that here.”

A group of health experts that advises the governor already has begun work on guidelines about how to prioritize patients if hospitals become overwhelmed. The general principle is that patients with a better chance of surviving would get life-saving resources before those with a slimmer chance of living, but quite a few questions remain about how those decisions would play out in real-world situations, with imperfect information.

What everyone wants to avoid is doctors having to decide which patients will get scarce resources, Douglas said. Those decisions, based on who is most likely to benefit from treatment, need to happen at a societal level, he said.

“It cannot be somebody like me who’s sitting in an ICU,” he said.

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What does it mean to believe in a higher power during a pandemic? Coloradans share how their faith helps them cope.

Two weeks ago, Joe Stone and his wife became ill. They didn’t know whether they had the coronavirus and couldn’t get tested. So they stayed home. Stone’s daughter couldn’t visit.

As Stone’s anxiety deepened, the Westminster IT worker turned to his Buddhist faith to find peace. He meditated, attempting to turn his worry into compassion.

“Because we can’t go outside, we go inward,” he said.

In a time of incomprehensible upheaval and uncertainty, Coloradans of faith have turned to their beliefs to help process it all. Some have found difficult questions: Where is my god amid this death and loss? Why is this happening? Is it a punishment?

“I believe almost every person of faith during crisis does struggle with hard questions,” said Natalie Keller, youth director at Holy Comforter Episcopal Church. “Why would God do this? Why did God let evil take a foothold? Is this God’s punishment for not forwarding that chain email in 2007?”

Many have also found a balm — a way to process immense change and see a larger picture, even as the sacred rituals of many faiths have been disrupted. Many are finding comfort there, in their prayers and video Bible groups, in scripture reading and meditation. Faith has allowed them to connect to a larger purpose, they said.

“From a spiritual perspective, we need faith in God,” said Rabbi Joe Black of Denver’s Temple Emanuel. “We also need faith in one another. The two are not necessarily different. I believe that we find God within humanity.”

Pope Francis arrives to deliver an ...
Alessandra Tarantino, The Associated Press

Pope Francis arrives to deliver an Urbi et orbi prayer from the empty St. Peter’s Square, at the Vatican, Friday, March 27, 2020. Praying in a desolately empty St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis on Friday likened the coronavirus pandemic to a storm laying bare illusions that people can be self-sufficient and instead finds “all of us fragile and disoriented” and needing each other’s help and comfort.

Recreating ritual

While many faith communities have pivoted to online services, there are some traditions that can be difficult to replicate remotely. For many faiths, the act of sharing a meal or holding hands during a prayer are just as sacred as the prayers recited.

For Muslims, physical proximity is an integral part of community prayer, Denver infectious disease researcher Nabeeh Hasan said. As both a scientist and a leader of the Colorado Muslim community, he worked hard to convince mosques to close, even though doing so meant losing a critical aspect of practice. It was a bitter pill to swallow, he said.

“When we stand for prayer, every person praying stands shoulder to shoulder, foot to foot to show that nobody is superior to the other, that we’re equal,” Hasan said.” It shows that we’re next to each other in the faith. That we close the gaps between us.”

That loss of physical community is traumatic, especially for those used to gathering five times a day to pray, he said. The Muslim community is also grappling with what to do when Ramadan starts on April 23. Traditionally, days of fasting are broken by a large community meal. But that’s not possible now. Some people might have to break their fast alone.

“We don’t know what we’re going to do,” Hasan said. “We don’t have an answer.”

Connecting to long-held traditions and finding community was one of the reasons 29-year-old Colin Mays joined a non-denominational Christian church when he moved three years ago to Colorado Springs. Singing hymns, receiving communion and reciting prayers that have been repeated for generations helped him feel more connected to humanity, he said.

“It keeps me connected with my ancestors and the people that have come before me,” he said. “It reminds me of who we are and where we’ve been.”

Making sense of suffering

Lindsay Reed checked out Dante’s Inferno from the Denver Public Library about six weeks ago, before the grip of the virus had taken hold on the city. The classic epic poem describing the rings of hell was too much sometimes — she has to put it down sometimes.

“I just read with this sense of horror,” she said. “When I’m able to step back and think about it, it’s almost too close to what’s going on.”

Estimates that COVID-19 could kill up to 240,000 Americans are indeed hellish. Heartbreaking images continue to pour in from across the country: bodies being loaded into refrigerated trailers in New York City, grandparents dying alone in hospital rooms because their families can’t safely say goodbye. The collective grief can be overwhelming, and is causing many faithful to ponder questions that seem unanswerable.

But difficult questions are an essential part of faith, Black, the rabbi, said.

“It’s that lack of knowing that is an essential part of faith — we don’t know everything,” he said. “It’s the questions themselves that are sacred.”

Jews for generations have grappled with questions of how a loving God could allow horrors like the Holocaust, he said. Even amid normal loss, Black hears similar questions as he sits with the dying and their families.

“I think we need to avoid language that we’re being tested, punished or blessed by this pandemic,” he said. “I don’t think this pandemic is the work of God, even though it’s natural.”

Keller, the Episcopalian youth director, said every person of faith struggles with difficult questions. Sometimes there are simply no answers.

“We may never know why terrible events happen,” she said.  “We can take comfort in the fact that God meets us in times of trouble, God grieves with us, God turns our grief into beauty and compassion.”

Temple member Joe Stone, left, helps ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Temple member Joe Stone, left, helps Lhoppön Rinpoche get connected online before leading his first online meditation from Mipham Shedra Buddhist temple on March 29, 2020 in Westminster.

Finding hope

Stone, the Buddhist IT manager, healed from his illness and last week he reunited with his daughter. Through sitting with his suffering and anxiety, he felt more connected to others.

“The extreme anxiety we all feel around this — we’re all in the same boat, nobody’s not,” Stone said.

One of the key tenets of Buddhism, after all, is that suffering is a part of life. By accepting that idea, he was able to meditate on compassion and empathy.

“Therein lies the healing part of it,” he said.

Lhoppön Rinpoche leads his first online ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Lhoppön Rinpoche leads his first online meditation from Mipham Shedra Buddhist temple on March 29, 2020 in Westminster.

Some faith communities are seeing a surge in attendance to virtual services. Matt Patrick, a pastor at The Well Church in Boulder, said about double the amount of people are watching livestreams versus normal in-person church attendance. Temple Emanuel in Denver has seen the same, Black said.

“What we are finding is people are craving more than events and services, but are craving a faith community,” Black said. “I think people are returning to that need.”

And that’s where people are finding strength amid a virus that creates so much isolation and loneliness. In the volunteers who call elderly members of their congregation to make sure they have someone to talk to. In the church fundraisers to help with a medical bill or lost wages.

“Is there holiness in a disease? That’s a tough question,” Black said. “But I think there’s holiness in our response to it.”


Coronavirus: Hajdu brings public health experience, anthropology to pandemic fight

As Canada's federal health minister in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Hajdu's playing a leading role in an existential battle against a virus that promises to change the course of human societies around the globe -- the very thing cultural anthropologists spend their lives studying.


Post Premium: Our best stories for the week of March 30-April 5

Many of the early stories on the coronavirus’ assault on Colorado focused on facts and figures. What are the symptoms? How can you (try to) get tested? How many positive cases does the state have, and, eventually, how many deaths?

Those stories are important, but we didn’t want to lose sight of the personal side of the pandemic. How does it feel to have coronavirus? What does recovery look like?

Today reporter Alex Burness brings you the different experiences of five Coloradans.

“The whole time I was feeling fine, except for the breathing thing,” said one man who’s still in the hospital.

A 45-year-old woman was neither hospitalized nor tested despite feeling “like an elephant was sitting on my chest.”

One elderly woman didn’t survive her illness.

These stories matter, and you can count on us to keep telling them.

— Cindi Andrews, senior editor

Out of breath: Five Coloradans on what it’s like to have the coronavirus

Beth Arellano, 45, is now recovering ...
RJ Sangosti, The Denver Post

Beth Arellano, 45, is recovering at her Boulder apartment from what she thinks was COVID-19.


As we recently announced, this newsletter will become a subscriber-only benefit in the coming weeks and will include exclusive content. Those of you who are subscribers will continue to receive Post Premium, and we thank you for your support. If you are not a subscriber and don’t want to miss out on the very best from The Denver Post, please consider signing up.

📰 Not a subscriber yet? Here’s why you should support our work.


Five in-depth looks at Colorado in the age of coronavirus

Short on ventilators, Colorado hospitals prepare for a “worst-case scenario” for coronavirus patients

This Monday, March 23, 2020, file ...
John Minchillo, The Associated Press

Medical supplies and a stretcher are displayed before a news conference at the Jacob Javits Center in New York on March 23.

In hard-hit areas such as Italy and New York, doctors have had to choose which patients get access to lifesaving ventilator treatment because of a shortage of either the machines or people qualified to run them.

In the worst-case scenario, Colorado could be short as many 10,000 ventilators for coronavirus patients, but hospitals and government agencies are trying to avert a situation in which doctors have to make life-or-death decisions about who gets desperately needed care. Read more from Meg Wingerter.

RELATED: Colorado readies guidelines for prioritizing coronavirus patient care in case of hospital overload


Colorado sees “significant declines” in air pollution as coronavirus ramps down driving, industrial activity

Highway 36 is empty of cars ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

U.S. 36 is empty of cars heading east to Denver and west to Boulder on March 29 in Superior.

Air pollution has decreased sharply along Colorado’s Front Range, and in cities worldwide, with driving and industrial activity ramping down as the novel coronavirus spreads, according to data reviewed by The Denver Post. Read more from Bruce Finley.

RELATED: Coronavirus sends DIA passenger traffic plunging by 90%, prompting closure of north TSA checkpoint


Zoom weddings and drive-by birthdays: Life’s big moments still find a way in the midst of a pandemic

Amber Freed, right, and her son ...
Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Amber Freed coordinates a birthday party for her son, Max, 3, and his twin sister, Riley, not pictured, on March 27. The party observed physical distancing protocols.

A pandemic is disrupting most aspects of life in spring 2020, but it didn’t chill the warm glow of two hearts about to form a sacred union. It can’t suppress the compliments a brand new prom dress deserves. It won’t quell the triumph in another trip around the sun. Coronavirus has turned life upside-down, but Coloradans found alternative ways to celebrate in the here-and-now. Read more from Elizabeth Hernandez and Noelle Phillips.


Farm-to-table operations now taking an online farm-to-public approach in the age of coronavirus

Customer Mike Friedley points employee Ethan ...
AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

Customer Mike Friedley points employee Ethan Moore toward his van to load an order of cold meats. At right, Rock River Ranches owner Rex Moore watches as Don Smith signs for an order last month in Commerce City.

Before the coronavirus outbreak and the restrictions to slow its spread took hold, Clint and MaryKay Buckner were supplying about 50 restaurants with meat from their grass-fed, pasture-raised cattle, lambs and hogs. Now they’re looking for new ways to reach customers. Read more from Judith Kohler.

RELATED: Colorado’s unemployment rate is poised to double in less than three weeks. Here’s what you need to know.


Q&A: Gov. Jared Polis on the supply shortage, his stay-at-home order and when the coronavirus peak will hit

Governor of Colorado Jared Polis looks ...
Eric Lutzens, The Denver Post

Gov. Jared Polis looks over his papers March 25 before giving the order for Colorado residents to stay at home.

It’s been four weeks since Gov. Jared Polis announced Colorado’s first known cases of the new coronavirus. Now the governor has shut down nearly every nonessential activity and business in the state, and he remains worried about the state’s shortage of medical supplies and workers. On Wednesday he spoke with reporter Alex Burness about the bigger picture.


A few stories not related to the pandemic

As you might imagine, the vast majority of our resources are spent covering the effect COVID-19 has had on Colorado, but here are a handful of other important stories that we reported on this week.

+ Gannon Stauch case: Leaked arrest affidavit outlines case against boy’s stepmother

+ Death penalty dropped in Adams County sheriff deputy’s killing; trial postponed again

+ Hundreds of metro Denver home sellers yank their listings

+ Boyer’s Coffee owners pledge to rebuild historic company

+ A 36-year Denver dining institution will close for good in 2021

+ Where are the tigers from “Tiger King” now? Many of them live in Colorado, just 45 minutes from Denver. — The Know


Photo of the week

See more great photos like this on The Denver Post’s Instagram account.

UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital at ...
RJ Sangosti, The Denver Post

The University of Colorado Hospital is one of several hospitals working to get ready for the peak of patients because of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Colorado sees “significant declines” in air pollution as coronavirus ramps down driving, industrial activity

So long, sulfur dioxide. Goodbye, carbon monoxide.

At least temporarily, air pollution that hurts human lungs has decreased sharply along Colorado’s Front Range, and in cities worldwide, with driving and industrial activity ramping down as the novel coronavirus spreads, according to data reviewed by The Denver Post.

And this horrific pandemic is giving an unsolicited, yet possibly useful, glimpse of what it might take to bring an atmosphere clogged with toxic and heat-trapping gases, which contribute to climate change, back to a healthier balance.

Particulates pollution, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide also decreased this month around metro Denver — by up to 50% in some areas — compared with concentrations a year ago, the data shows. Decreases since January were even more abrupt, by 80% in the case of sulfur dioxide downtown.

Air quality researchers at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment looked at what fixed sensors were measuring in response to queries by The Post. They provided data from five monitoring stations that federal and state regulators use to track Colorado’s legally mandated efforts to deal with bad air that for two decades has flunked national health standards.

Investigating air pollution trends during the COVID-19 crisis is “premature” and “not a priority,” state officials emphasized, cautioning that more data would be needed to draw firm conclusions.

But “we see significant declines,” Garry Kaufman, director of Colorado’s Air Pollution Control Division, said in an emailed statement.

“We have a network of air monitors throughout the state, including the Front Range,” he said. “We will continue to operate and maintain these monitors, and they will continue to provide us with valuable data. Because the disease is respiratory, air quality is more important now than ever.”

U.S. and European satellites have observed significant decreases in nitrogen dioxide levels following shutdowns in China, Europe and across the United States. Satellite images over the past two weeks, provided by researchers to The Post, showed markedly reduced muck in the air over Los Angeles, New York and Seattle.

Unlike this satellite data, the Colorado data comes from air-testing instruments positioned near ground level that measure concentrations of multiple pollutants that people inhale.

The data provided to The Post, comparing pollutant concentrations between March 2019 and March 2020, showed the following average decreases:

  • Sulfur dioxide (SO2) dropped by 36%. A toxic gas that comes mostly from industrial burning of coal and other fossil fuels, sulfur dioxide weakens lung defenses and impairs breathing. It can cause wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath, especially in people with asthma.
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) decreased by 20%. The pollutant is linked to driving and other activities that at high levels chokes off oxygen entering the blood.
  • Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) fell by 24%. This pollutant wafts out of vehicle tailpipes and power plants, irritating eyes and throats, causing respiratory distress. Scientists watch it as a relatively quick indicator of air pollution trends.
  • Nitric oxide (NO) decreased by 26%. A precursor to nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone (O3), which worsens respiratory problems and is linked to thousands of premature deaths, it comes from burning fossil fuels.
  • Large particulates (PM10, smaller than 10 microns) dropped by 37% and fine particulates (PM2.5, smaller than 2.5 microns) fell by 45%. A wide range of industrial activities and vehicle transport churn up particulates, which affect respiratory health, especially hurting people with asthma. Particulate pollution also is a major component of the haze that frequently obscures views of Colorado’s white-capped Front Range mountains.

Measurements of the main heat-trapping greenhouse gases that cause global warming — carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)  — haven’t been done. These pollutants mix into the atmosphere and concentrations don’t respond quickly to changes. As temperatures rise and soil warms in spring, carbon dioxide levels tend to rise. Record-high atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and methane are expected this year, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials said Thursday. And any effects of virus-related ramp-downs on these global warming drivers likely wouldn’t show up for months.

A nearly-empty I-25 exit ramp to ...
Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

A nearly-empty Interstate 25 exit ramp to Colfax Avenue in Denver on Sunday, March 29, 2020.

Too soon to tell

Colorado researchers said it’s too early to determine the effects of virus-related shutdowns on ozone, for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has deemed Colorado a “serious” violator of federal health limits.

Pinpointing the extent to which reductions result from less driving, less flying or less factory and power plant activity would require further study, state authorities said.

Over the past month, driving in Colorado has decreased with hundreds fewer cars on roads each day. Gov. Jared Polis noted at a briefing last week, that automatic traffic recorders measured a 60% reduction in vehicles.

Another factor may be a partial shutdown since March 17 after an equipment failure at the Suncor Energy oil refinery north of Denver, which ranks among Colorado’s largest polluters, emitting 800,000 tons a year of heat-trapping and other gases including sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, ozone-forming volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides and particulates. The refinery has been plagued with equipment failures, despite heavy investments, and state regulators on Wednesday sent Suncor a letter urging steps to prevent future problems, saying continued “opacity exceedances” are unacceptable.

In New York, Boston and other cities, air quality researchers are attempting to measure changes in nitrogen dioxide, carbon dioxide and other pollution following the imposition of stay-at-home orders and shutdowns.

Scientists say air-testing data collected during the coronavirus pandemic must be analyzed carefully, taking into consideration the influences of cloud cover, wind and sun — which affect the concentrations of pollutants people breathe. Meanwhile, World Health Organization teams are investigating whether particulate air pollution may be a vector that spreads COVID-19 and makes it more virulent.

Pollution trends as humans suddenly drive much less and shut down industrial activities amount to what some scientists are calling a massive and unwanted “natural experiment” on air quality.

“Obviously, the priority here is getting through this with the maximum number of people healthy —  mentally and physically,” said Boulder-based atmospheric chemist Tammy Thompson, senior air quality scientist for the Environmental Defense Fund.

“But there is this data that can help scientists understand how to improve air quality once things go back to normal. This will help us understand what sources are causing the biggest impacts. And hopefully it will get us more motivated to do something about it,” Thompson said. “There is a link between air pollution and human health.”

Ramping back up

Some air experts now are considering the extent to which rapidly ramping up industry, transport and energy activity if the virus subsides necessarily would entail ramping up harmful air pollution. Shifts toward working from home and online meetings, if sustained, could help reap health and environmental benefits.

Nearly-empty streets of a residential area ...
Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Nearly-empty streets of a residential area on the east side of Sloan’s Lake in Denver on Sunday, March 29, 2020.

Non-polluting renewable energy in recent months moved ahead of coal in the United States for generating electricity, and it appears that investment in clean energy is likely to continue after the virus, said Vivienne Heston, spokeswoman for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a think tank on efforts to accelerate green utilities development.

“That’s good for reducing carbon emissions,” Heston said. “There’s a strong argument to be made for renewables. We are definitely in a transition, and the world has to decide how quickly we want to transition.”

After the economic Great Recession of 2008-2009, air researchers estimated that total carbon dioxide pollution decreased by about 2%. But then carbon dioxide concentrations bounced back to record high levels.

Beyond air chemistry, economics and the virus, much will depend on politics, Thompson said.

“We need to have the right people making decisions at federal and state levels who care about cleaning up the air.”


Scituate Barracks

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov

On April 4, 2020 at 11:19 PM, Troopers arrested Keila Jasso Hernandez, age 29, of 50 Franklin Street Apt. #307, Worcester...


Lincoln Woods Barracks

No arrests to report.

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov


Coronavirus: after long wait, 65 Hongkongers arrive home after weeks stranded in Peru

Sixty-five Hong Kong residents stranded in Peru finally flew back to the city on Sunday afternoon with the help of the authorities, but the city government is being urged to assist residents stuck in India and elsewhere to also come home.The residents took a government-chartered flight from the Peruvian capital Lima to London, where they boarded a regular flight back to Hong Kong. After landing at 4.15pm, they were taken in coaches from the airport tarmac to AsiaWorld-Expo, which the government…


Coronavirus: Lord Bath dies after contracting Covid-19

Lord Bath - the 7th Marquess of Bath - died on Saturday, it was announced by Longleat on Twitter.


‘Disaster’ possible if COVID-19 protections not given to migrant workers: advocates

The federal and provincial governments are facing a ``potential disaster'' if more coronavirus protections and social-distancing guidelines aren't extended to migrant agricultural workers, advocates say.


Trying to workout at home? The YMCA has online videos to help

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The COVID-19 pandemic has forced gyms across the Tennessee Valley to temporarily close their doors and it may have put a dent in your fitness routine, but you don't have to let it!

The YMCA wants to encourage people to get off the couch and workout at home. If it's sunny out, they recommend getting outdoors and going for a run or a walk.

Or you can turn your living room into a gym.

Grab some green beans or your container of laundry detergent and use those for weights and use your couch or a chair instead of a bench - anything to get your body moving.

Southeast YMCA Fitness and Corporate Wellness Director Sharon Allen says there are many benefits.

"It's going to boost your immune system which is something we definitely want to boost in these times. It's also going to boost endorphins. Endorphins are the feel good hormone. So if you are releasing endorphins you are increasing your mood. You feel better."

The YMCA has free workout videos available on its website for seniors, kids, and even new moms.

There's something for everyone and you don't have to have a membership to access them.


Wickford Barracks

No arrests to report.

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov


Coronavirus: stress over university entrance exams has skyrocketed amid Hong Kong school closures, study finds

The stress levels of Hong Kong students sitting for the upcoming university entrance examination are at an all-time high amid the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, which has forced schools to close, according to a study released on Sunday.The study, comprising two polls conducted by the student counselling group Hok Yau Club in January and March, also indicates the coronavirus’ impact on candidates’ study has been far greater than that of the social unrest that has plagued the city since last June.The…


Coronavirus: Canadians aboard Coral Princess cruise ship to begin returning home

The company has said that a dozen people on board have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, while others are experiencing flu-like symptoms.


Coronavirus: Canadians aboard Coral Princess cruise ship to begin returning home

The company has said that a dozen people on board have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, while others are experiencing flu-like symptoms.


Coronavirus: Man ‘licked fingers and rubbed them on Lidl goods’

A man, who does not have Covid-19, has been charged with contaminating or interfering with goods.


Bedridden for days, young Canadians with COVID-19 say illness is ‘no joke’

Canadians in their 20s diagnosed with the new coronavirus say their illness was severe and they are concerned about infecting more vulnerable people.


Colorado coronavirus skeptic gains new perspective after being hospitalized with it

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SOUTH FORK, Colo. (KDVR) -- You've probably heard someone say it at this point: the coronavirus is being blown out of proportion by the media, especially because more people die from the flu.

Clint Johnson of South Fork, Colorado was one of the many people who felt that way.

"I just didn't take it serious. I just thought it was something media was coming up with to distract us from something," Johnson said.

However, Johnson's perspective changed when got the coronavirus himself.

He's now sharing his story with others hoping others don't make the same mistake he did.

"It's like the flu times 10. You don't want to do anything. You're just completely miserable. I've never been that sick before," said Johnson.

Johnson doesn't know where he contracted coronavirus. All he knows is that he came home from a weekend of 4-wheeling in Moab, Utah feeling a little under the weather.

"One night I went to eat some ice cream and it just tasted like ice. I was like, 'this is weird,'" Johnson said. "I pretty much blew it off. I was a skeptic saying, 'I just got a cold, there's nothing wrong.'"

Two days later, Johnson woke up and realized he didn't have an ordinary cold.

"I couldn't feel my hands and fingers," he said.

Johnson drove to the hospital in Del Norte and after a scan of his lungs he was flown by helicopter to Parkview Medical Center in Pueblo.

His symptoms grew worse, and included pounding headaches, extremely low blood pressure and a fever that wouldn't go away with medication. While he says he was able to breathe, he also felt some compression in his chest, like he was in a constant bear hug. However, the fever was the worst.

"I would wake up soaking wet. There was one whole day I slept on ice just to try and keep in manageable," he said.

On Johnson's second night at the hospital, the coronavirus patient next door passed away and doctors worried Clint's organs might start to shut down.

"They told me it was like baby shards of glass in all your air pockets," he explained.

Doctors began treating him with hydroxycloriquine and zithromax. For Clint, the drugs worked. Within two days, he began to improve.

"It did wonders in my case," he said.

After six days in the hospital, Clint is now back at his home in South Fork with a new perspective on the coronavirus.

He's now sharing his story hoping it might help save someone else's life.

"None of us were taking it seriously and if I would have done my part and stayed home, there's no telling who I could have prevented from getting it," he said.


Carer breaks down after Tesco queue skip rejection

Lynne Tonkin was told she couldn’t cut the Tesco despite it meaning an old lady couldn’t receive food.


Watford Hospital: Nursing assistant dies after helping virus patients

John Alagos, 24, became ill after working at Watford General Hospital in Hertfordshire.


Fatal motor-vehicle accident reported in Bridgeport

Scott Appleby, director of the Office of Emergency Management & Emergency Communications, said “preliminary report of a fatal MVA located at Warren Street and Frontage Road.”


Wayne Rooney says players face a no-win situation in wage debate

Derby striker Wayne Rooney says the power struggle over how footballers use their wages to aid the coronavirus fight is "a disgrace".


Ian Holloway: Grimsby Town boss on painting during coronavirus lockdown

Grimsby Town manager Ian Holloway talks about his love for art - but why it is not quite keeping him "sane" during lockdown.


David Jackson: Ex-rugby pro using calisthenics to help people stay active

David Jackson hopes to help people in isolation stay active with exercises he used after injury ended his playing career.


Coronavirus testing: how it works and where to get tested for Covid-19

The coronavirus testing process depends on the instructions of the health authorities of the place where you live.In Hong Kong, it is recommended people call their doctors and get tested if they have symptoms of infection, they have travelled to regions with high infection rates, or they have had close contacts with someone infected.The most common symptoms of Covid-19 are fever, tiredness, and a dry cough. Some people may also develop other symptoms such as shortness of breath, aches, sore…


Coronavirus: Hong Kong records 28 new infections, taking total to 890

The mother of a six-week-old baby boy who previously tested positive for the coronavirus was among 28 cases confirmed in Hong Kong on Sunday, taking the total to 890.Health authorities also said most patients and medical staff who might had been exposed in the possible first transmission within a public hospital had been tested, with half coming back negative.Dr Chuang Shuk-kwan, head of the communicable disease branch at the Centre for Health Protection, said the mother began to show symptoms…


Coronavirus: Queen to urge ‘self-discipline and resolve’

The Queen will also thank NHS workers in a speech to the nation on Sunday, Buckingham Palace says.


Minors arrested during protests mostly victims exploited by others, Hong Kong’s deputy police chief says

Many of the minors arrested during anti-government protests were goaded into taking part by online messages and were actually victims of their own poor judgment, Hong Kong’s top police operations commander told the Post in an exclusive interview.But among the people who did deserve blame were politicians who had “exploited” youths for their own gain, Raymond Siu Chak-yee said.Siu described his time spent on the front lines of the protests that saw riot police, armed with tear gas, rubber…


BBC Sport’s five things to do today

Our team give you something to read, watch, try, listen and take - all in one place.


Coronavirus: Hong Kong may have to impose wider lockdown, government adviser says, amid warnings of third wave of outbreak

Hong Kong may have to impose a wider lockdown and close all non-essential businesses for several weeks, a top government adviser has said, amid warnings of a “third wave” of coronavirus outbreak by an epidemiologist.Bernard Chan’s remark, aired on a prerecorded radio programme on Sunday, came as leading infectious diseases expert Yuen Kwok-yung warned of a possible third wave of transmission in the city as mainland Chinese are gradually resuming work and might travel to Hong Kong.Hong Kong has…


SHAFTSBURY BARRACKS/ MV Crash/ DUI #1

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   PRESS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#:  20B301085                                           RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Raymond Witkowski STATION: Shaftsbury                                      CONTACT#: (802) 442-5421   DATE/TIME: 04/05/2020, 0044 hours STREET: Lake Paran Road TOWN: Shaftsbury


Rutland Barracks // DUI, Resisting

DATE/TIME: April 4, 2020, at approximately 0047 LOCATION: US 7, Rutland Town   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE   CASE#: 20B401295                                                         TROOPER: Zach Shaughnessy STATION: Rutland                     CONTACT#: (802) 773-9101   DATE/TIME: April 4th, 2020 at 0047 hours LOCATION:


Daphne Police looking for missing senior

ALABAMA – The Daphne Police Department is asking for your help in locating a missing 78-year-old man.

James Edward Murphee was last seen in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama around 1:30 p.m Saturday (April 4). Murphee may be suffering from a condition that may impair his judgement.

Authorities say he may be traveling to Jefferson County or Daphne, Alabama. According to the missing senior alert, Murphee may be driving a Gray 2013 Toyota Tacoma with Alabama license plate 5AJ3651.

If anyone has any information regarding the whereabouts of Murphee please contact the Daphne Police Department at (251) 621-9100.


MISSING RUNAWAY JUVENILE – Grant County, NM Joseph Trujillo

Grant County, NM - The New Mexico State Police is seeking the public's assistance in locating Joseph Trujillo. He was last seen at Bear Canyon Lake at approximately 4:40 p.m., in Mimbres, New Mexico.

Joseph Trujillo is a fifteen-year-old Hispanic male, five-feet-tall, weighing 115 pounds, with brown eyes and brown dreadlocks. He was last seen on April 4, 2020 wearing light grey sweatpants, dark navy-blue hoodie, and black tennis shoes. Joseph Trujillo is MISSING and is believed to be in DANGER if not located.

Anyone with any information regarding this New Mexico MISSING ENDANGERED JUVENILE ADVISORY is asked to call the New Mexico State Police at (575) 382-2500 or 911.


###

Crash/Derby

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#:20A501220                                                      RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME:Trooper Berlandy STATION:Derby                             CONTACT#:802-334-8881   DATE/TIME:04/04/2020 1653 hours STREET:US RT 5 TOWN:Derby LANDMARK AND/OR CROSS STREETS:Quarry Rd


Warm and humid Sunday, rain on the way Tuesday

The clouds drifted into the Tennessee Valley Saturday afternoon, but they didn’t put a damper on our afternoon temperatures! Thermometers at Huntsville International Airport reached 78 degrees Saturday, and they reached the mid-70s in The Shoals.

Expect a partly to mostly cloudy sky for Sunday morning, with cool temperatures in the low to mid 50s. Sunday afternoon will feature a mix of sun and clouds, and a brief isolated rain shower is possible, but overall dry conditions will prevail through Sunday evening. Afternoon temperatures will climb to the mid to upper 70s again, which is about 5-7 degrees above average.

Rain on the way late Monday into Tuesday

Our next rain-maker approaches late Monday and arrives Tuesday, with the bulk of the rain showers occurring during late morning into early Tuesday afternoon.

While rain showers will be widespread Tuesday, the actual precipitation amounts are trending downwards — only about 0.2″ to 0.4″ through Wednesday morning. This is a good trend to see, since the Tennessee Valley is already 10-14″ above average, year-to-date, so heavy rainfall would be unwelcome.

Still, rain is a *good* thing, considering April serves as the beginning of the growing season, and a gentle rain would encourage young seedlings and crops to grow before the summer heat arrives.

Average Last Spring Freeze

Temperatures will remain variable over the next few weeks, and a killing frost/freeze is not out of the question.

Average date of last frost for the entire state of Alabama. (Source: UA Department of Geography)
Average date of last frost for the entire state of Alabama. (Source: UA Department of Geography)

Keep in mind that cold-sensitive plants, like tomatoes, do not do well even if the air temperature is above 32 degrees (gardenguides.com says that tomato plants can get injured when temperatures are in the low 40s).  Even in sheltered areas, like covered porches, chilly temperatures can harm sensitive plants. Be sure to have a way of bringing them inside, or develop a way to protect them if they are already established in the soil. Morning lows in the 40s are possible heading into next weekend.

The “usual” rule of thumb is to wait until after Easter to put your sensitive plants in the ground — but sometimes, Easter arrives early, much earlier than the average final frost for the region.

So if you haven’t started your spring garden yet, try to hold off until mid-to-late April. A good rule of thumb is to wait until after Tax Day (April 15).  Some say you should wait until May 1 to be safe.


Average Last Freeze for North Alabama

It’s okay to plant cool season crops now, such as collards, lettuces, onions and kale.

According to the National Weather Service, the average “last freeze” date for the Huntsville area is April 2, though the latest freeze on record took place on May 7, 1944. The average date fluctuates throughout the Tennessee Valley, but April 15th is a good, rough guideline. Below is a list of various average dates for last freezes throughout the Tennessee Valley.

SpringDate

A personal (brown thumb) storyWhen I lived in Atlanta, I used to grow container vegetables in my back porch area. During the spring of 2007, we had a very early and very prolonged period of spring-like weather in late February through March. I put my tomatoes into the containers in mid March… And the first week of April, we had a cold snap that sent temperatures below freezing. I lost my tomatoes :-/ And I learned the hard way to wait until Tax Day :-)What about you? Do you have any green thumb tips, or brown thumb stories? Email us: weather@whnt.com.

– Christina Edwards

Connect with me!
Facebook: Christina Edwards, WHNT
Twitter: @ChristinaWHNTwx


Shaftsbury Barracks / Domestic Assault

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B301080 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Nicholas Grimes                             STATION: Shaftsbury Barracks                     CONTACT#: (802) 442-5421   DATE/TIME: April 4th, 2020, at approximately 1939 hours INCIDENT LOCATION: Sandgate, VT


Coronavirus: for Hong Kong’s retailers left reeling from double blow of social unrest and pandemic, pain is proving useful lesson

Hong Kong’s shopping district of Causeway Bay remains bustling with people most days even amid the coronavirus pandemic, but few stop to read the posters plastered along streets advertising sales. Dozens of stores sit empty, their interiors ripped out, leaving behind just a concrete shell.At the popular G2000 fashion outlet at Jardine's Crescent, spring and summer clothes are selling at a discount, but the place is quiet with just five customers browsing over the course of half an hour.Company…


Emergency court orders still available in Madison County during COVID-19 pandemic

Data pix.

MADISON COUNTY, Ala. - Within the past few weeks, several businesses and facilities have closed including the Madison County Courthouse. One judge said even though the courthouse is closed, the court system is still up and running.

Madison County Presiding Circuit Judge Ruth Ann Hall said the two are separate.

Hall wants people to understand that judges, clerks and lawyers continue to work during this time and people can still obtain emergency court orders if needed.

"Like protection from abuse orders," she explained. "Perhaps they need emergency relief from a existing order that they are operating under."

That also includes child custody obligations. Hall said even with the new stay-at-home order in place, parents are still required to uphold their visitation agreements.

"The governor's stay at home order did not change, did not affect a custody order," Hall explained. "Visitation exchanges are exempt from the governor's order and the public health order. Visitation and exchanges should take place pursuant to the order that you currently have in your case."

Though the courthouse is noticeably emptier than usual, Hall said there's always at least one judge in the building during the week, but operations have shifted.

"We do not have in person proceedings, unless it is something related to an emergency or constitutionally required proceedings," she added.

While the courthouse doors have closed to the public, Hall said the work will never stop.


Home improvement store sees increase in business after stay-at-home order issued

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MADISON, Ala. - Alabama's stay-at-home order went into effect Saturday at 5 p.m. The order requires residents to stay home except for 'essential activities'.

Big box stores were busier than usual across North Alabama as people prepared to stay home and stay busy with home improvement projects.

"It's full. It's a madhouse. There are people everywhere," said shopper Dewayne Dupree. "They're going to be stranded at home for three weeks with nothing to do… so home improvements."

While "essential businesses" can remain open, they have to follow certain rules to comply with social distancing. Lowe's in Madison had employees enforcing occupancy rules.

"There is a line outside that you have to enter through to go in. They're letting them go in one at a time," said shopper Adi Patel.

A Lowe's manager told WHNT News 19 they are only allowing 50 people in the garden center at a time and operating at 50 percent or less capacity in accordance with the governor's order.

"Until they enforce it, I don't believe people will take it too seriously," Patel said. "As you can see, there's like loads of people out here."

While people are still going to stores, many are taking precautions by wearing masks and gloves in an effort to stay healthy.

"I'm just trying to protect myself. Trying to stop from touching anything with my bare hands and with the mask," said shopper Jatinder Saini.

Building supply stores are considered an essential business and will remain open throughout the duration of the stay-at-home order which is set to end April 30.


Coronavirus: Hong Kong lawmakers are not exempted from social-distancing rules, government says after Tanya Chan in Sham Shui Po bar gathering

Hong Kong lawmakers are not exempted from the new social-distancing rules outside the legislature, the government has said, as a pro-democracy lawmaker reportedly gathered in a group of 40 in a bar.The statement came on Saturday night as local media reported that Tanya Chan from the Civic Party went to a bar in Sham Shui Po on Thursday night. The report described that the bar had its metal gate closed by half and that Chan claimed she had gone there in her capacity as a lawmaker to meet…


WILLISTON BARRACKS/ DUI #1- DRUGS

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   PRESS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20A101561                                           RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Barone STATION: Williston                                           CONTACT#: 802-878-7111   DATE/TIME: April 4, 2020 at 6:59 pm STREET: Interstate 89 northbound at mile marker 87.9


Judges deny California inmate release request, cite US law

Federal judges on Saturday refused on procedural grounds to order California to free thousands of prisoners to ease crowded conditions that attorneys representing inmates likened to a “tinderbox” ready to … Click to Continue »


Shaftsbury Barracks/Negligent Operation & More

VSP News Release-Incident STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B301078 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Tyler Silva                             STATION: Shaftsbury                   CONTACT#: 802-442-5421 DATE/TIME: April 4, 2020 at approximately 1920 hours INCIDENT LOCATION: East Road,


Merced County coronavirus infections increase to 27. First local non-adult case reported

Eight new coronavirus cases were reported Saturday in Merced County, raising the total number of infected residents to 27, according to the Merced County Department of Public Health. The number … Click to Continue »


Coronavirus threatens Hong Kong’s very future if it cannot protect livelihoods along with lives

Around 30 per cent of the world’s population is now in lockdown as governments implement unprecedented and wide-reaching policies aimed at slowing the spread of Covid-19. Even considering the latest controls by the Hong Kong government, which limit public gatherings to a maximum of four people, restrictions in Europe and North America are more severe than those in Hong Kong. 

Lives are important, but so too are livelihoods. While the Hong Kong government has been relatively quick to place…


Surprise birthday parade held for DeKalb County siblings

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DEKALB COUNTY, Ala. - A DeKalb County mother called on her community to help make sure her son and daughter felt celebrated, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

April McQueen asked family, friends and loved ones to participate in a surprise parade at their home in Dogwood, AL Saturday. Her son Max turned eight Saturday. Her Adabelle turned six in March.

April said over 20 people arrived, some with gifts in hand. In a Facebook post, April thanked everyone for making her children feel special.


Royalton Barracks / VAPO

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B201065 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Max Fabian                             STATION: Royalton Barracks                      CONTACT#: (802)234-9933   DATE/TIME: 04/03/2020 1835 hours INCIDENT LOCATION: Gage Rd, Bethel VIOLATION: Violation of an Abuse Prevention Order   ACCUSED


Esports are already online (obviously), but the pandemic is still creating huge challenges

(CNN) — Golf, basketball, hockey and other sports have all suspended their seasons. Major league baseball says it may start up in late spring. But competitive video gaming is going strong as esports tournaments move their operations completely online.

Some companies, including the Electronic Sports League, Riot Games and Activision Blizzard, resumed their competitions online after pulling events in the US, Europe and Asia with a brief hiatus or no delay.

“It’s pretty incredible that both Overwatch League and Call of Duty League will be the only city-based leagues still fortunate enough to operate in this current environment,” Pete Vlastelica, president and CEO of Activision Blizzard Esports, said in a statement to CNN Business.

“I miss traditional sports, like we all do. At the same time I’m proud our leagues can compete online,” he said, noting that Call of Duty League is still delayed but will be back online “soon.” Activision did not comment on the delay.

Esports experienced a 37% increase in the average number of viewers per tournament last quarter, compared to the same period last year, according to Stream Hatchet, a video game analytics company.

As the esports industry draws more viewership online, it’s also attracting new interest in a world where traditional sports are on pause.

“The changing environment is turning both consumer and advertiser attention toward the gaming video content space, with esports being part of this,” said Nicole Pike, managing director of Nielsen Esports.

Pro athletes are spending more time playing and streaming video games, and the US Navy recently launched an esports team called “Goats & Glory.” (The United States Naval Academy’s mascot is Bill the Goat.) The US Army and the US Air force already have esports teams.

“With esports being a billion dollar industry and millions of consumers, it was definitely a space we wanted to get into,” Captain Matt “Smoke” Boren, chief marketing officer of the Navy Recruiting Command, told CNN Business. “At a time where a lot of people’s activities have been disrupted, [sailors] can’t do face-to-face team activities anymore. It’s just a safe place to go to.”

Esports have long copied the playbook of traditional sports, organizing glitzy in-person events that emulate the Super Bowl and the Olympics. Some are now canceled.

In February, an Electronic Sports League event ran without a live audience due to concerns by state officials in Katowice, Poland about coronavirus. “We suddenly had to scramble and tell everyone, ‘Don’t come,'” said Craig Levine, global chief strategy officer of ESL (Electronic Sports League).

Although some fans complained about the change on social media, online viewership for the “Counter-Strike: Global Offensive” tournament was record-breaking, said Levine, although the 11,000-person stadium in which it was heldwas eerily empty except for players and staff.

Riot Games, creator of “League of Legends,” announced last November that it would host its annual World Championship in Shanghai, China but that plan is in now in doubt. The annual event typically falls in November.

It might mean doing without a live audience or becoming an online-only event. “We’re scenario-planning around all our options,” said Riot Games’ head of partnerships Naz Aletaha.

For now, Riot’s advertisers are understanding, she said. The video game company currently has deals with Mercedes-Benz in China, Louis Vuitton, MasterCard, State Farm and others.

When an esports event goes fullyonline, it creates disruption for gaming companies and their participants. There are fewer gigs for the freelancers who normally work those events. And instead of having a referee onsite, players must be monitored from their homes to guarantee none cheat. Companies increasingly require players to install tracking software and cameras in their homes.

Players may also face different internet speeds rom their home countries when they compete in a global event. ESL’s Levine said that for now, regional events are being held to prevent this issue.

It’s unclear whether companies can recouplosses from canceled in-personevents with increased viewership into ad and partnership revenue.

For the ESL, the increase in Twitch views doesn’t translate “dollar for dollar” into revenue, according to Levine. And the company bore a significant loss when it had to refund tickets for its Polish event.

“We’re not able to directly benefit from[increased viewership of online only games]. But we’ve been around for 20 years and we’re big believers,” said Levine, who noted that suchevents cost much less to run than physical ones. “We’ll be surviving and thriving.”


Google to release your location data to help fight coronavirus pandemic

(CNN) — Google (GOOGL) is publicly releasing the data it’s already collecting about people’s movements during the coronavirus pandemic.

The company said it plans to publish a series of “Community Mobility Reports” to show the types of places people are visiting across 131 countries and regions. The first report was published on Friday.

Google said in a blog post it hopes tracking movement trends over time and by geography could help shape and inform governments’ and public health officials’ response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The reports, which contain data from two to three days earlier, intend to spot trends in how people are behaving and responding to social distancing. Broken down by country and then by region, the reports will show if people are headed to retail and grocery stores, pharmacies, parks, workplaces and more. It’ll also show how busy these places were before the pandemic.

The company said the findings are “created with aggregated, anonymized sets of data from users who have turned on the location history setting, which is off by default” in Google’s services.

It added that it would not release information that could be used to identify its users, such as individual location or contacts.

“In addition to other resources public health officials might have, we hope these reports will help support decisions about how to manage the COVID-19 pandemic,” Google said in a blog post. “This information could help officials understand changes in essential trips that can shape recommendations on business hours or inform delivery service offerings.”

The news comes as much of the world’s population is living under restrictions and lockdowns to curb the spread of Covid-19, which has killed more than 54,000 people globally and sickened more than one million, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University.

But Google’s move to release location data highlights concerns around privacy. According to Mark Skilton, director of the Artificial Intelligence Innovation Network at Warwick Business School in the UK, Google’s decision to use public data “raises a key conflict between the need for mass surveillance to effectively combat the spread of coronavirus and the issues of confidentiality, privacy, and consent concerning any data obtained.”

“Covid-19 is an emergency on such a huge scale that, if anonymity is managed appropriately, internet giants and social media platforms could play a responsible part in helping to build collective crowd intelligence for social good, rather than profit,” Skilton said.

In March, Google confirmed to CNN it was exploring ways to use aggregated, anonymized data to help in the coronavirus effort, as first reported by the Washington Post. Facebook also confirmed at the time it is working on similar efforts.


No shelter for ‘McRefugees’ amid coronavirus horror: is something wrong with Hong Kong if closure of fast-food outlets means homeless have nowhere to go?

The golden arches of McDonald’s have long represented more than a fast-food restaurant to Hong Kong’s homeless.Hundreds of people who sleep overnight at the chain’s 24-hour branches, or “McRefugees” as they are known, have been forced onto the streets after the restaurant decided to close its dinner dine-in services for a fortnight from April 1 to curb the spread of the dreaded coronavirus.Lily wears a black baseball cap and lilac waterproof jacket. Her mask keeps falling down as she talks. It…


Crash closes part of Derby Ave. in Seymour

An area of Derby Avenue was shut down Saturday night as police investigated a crash.


2 guns seized by troopers in Milford after threatening complaint

Two guns were seized after troopers responded to a reported threatening incident Friday morning, Connecticut State Police said.


Edmonton dry cleaner to begin production of cloth face masks amid COVID-19 pandemic

Page the Cleaner in Edmonton will soon begin production of cloth face masks to help protect people from getting COVID-19.


San Francisco park’s 150th birthday celebration goes online

Golden Gate Park turns 150 years old on Saturday, and the huge party to celebrate San Francisco's beloved treasure will, for the time being, take place online. Originally, city officials … Click to Continue »


President Trump says ‘toughest’ weeks ahead as coronavirus spreads

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump warned Saturday that the county could be headed into its “toughest” weeks yet as the coronavirus death toll mounts, but at the same time he expressed growing impatience with social distancing guidelines and said he’s eager to get the country reopened and its stalled economy back on track.

“There will be a lot of death, unfortunately,” Trump said in a somber start to his daily briefing on the pandemic. “There will be death.”

Joining Trump were Vice President Mike Pence, virus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s foremost infection disease expert. Each stood far apart from one another on the small stage.

Trump added a twist on his familiar push for a drug that hasn’t been clearly shown to work to stop the virus — he said may start taking it as a preventative measure after consulting with his doctor, even though there’s no evidence to show it works for that, either.

The president initially had suggested the country could reopen by Easter but pulled back seeing projections of a staggering death toll even if restrictive measures remain in place. But just days after extending tough national guidelines through the end of April, staring down historic levels of unemployment and economic standstill, he was talking about reopening as soon as possible, and speaking Saturday with leaders of professional sports leagues about filling arenas again.

“This country was not designed to be closed,” he said. “The cure cannot be worse than the problem.”

The number of people infected in the U.S. has exceeded 300,000, with the death toll climbing past 8,100; more than 3,500 of those deaths are in the state of New York.

Much of the country is under orders to stay home, including professional sports leagues that were among the first to clamp down in the pandemic. Trump spoke by phone with top leaders including Roger Goodell of the National Football League and the NBA’s Adam Silver, telling them he hoped to get people back in seats as soon as possible.

“I want fans back in the arenas,” he said. “Whenever we’re ready, as soon as we can.”

The virus has decimated the sports world with the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League suspending their seasons indefinitely and Major League Baseball postponing the start of its season. The NCAA basketball tournament was also canceled; so were college spring sports.

A person with knowledge of the call said some of the commissioners weren’t quite as optimistic as Trump because of the concerns raised by public health officials but appreciated the president’s desire to give people hope and fans a reason to be optimistic. The person requested anonymity to discuss the private call.

California’s Gov. Gavin Newsom, who has three NFL teams in his state, was asked if he thought the NFL season would start on time in September. “I’m not anticipating that happening in this state,” he said.

Hart-hit states were seeing cases rise. Trump suggested that some states were asking for more medical supplies than they really needed. He said the goal was to stay several days ahead of critical medical needs in each state.

“The fears of the shortages have led to inflated requests,” he said.

Louisiana officials have said New Orleans is on track to run out of ventilators by next week. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-N.Y., whose state is at the epicenter of the national pandemic with over 113,700 confirmed cases as of Saturday morning, has pleaded for ventilators for days. New York is poised to get more than 1,100 ventilators from China and Oregon.

Health officials did offer some hope that social distance measures were working. Fauci said he saw the efforts in action as he went out for a walk in Washington, D.C., and noticed people waiting six feet apart for restaurant take out.

“As sobering and a difficult as this is, what we are doing is making a difference,” Fauci said.

But even as Fauci urged Americans to be patient and let mitigation efforts work, Trump said: “Mitigation does work. But again, we’re not going to destroy our country.”

The previously booming economy had been among Trump’s biggest talking point as he heads into the 2020 presidential election, but the past few weeks have seen precipitous drops as the U.S. deals with the fallout from the virus that has shuttered businesses, gutted airlines and forced scores of people into their homes.

The president also continued to tout hydroxychloroquine, a drug long used to treat malaria, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, after very small preliminary studies suggested it might help prevent the coronavirus from entering cells and possibly help patients clear the virus sooner. But the drug has major potential side effects, especially for the heart, and large studies are underway to see if it is safe and effective for treating COVID-19.

Trump suggested he may consider whether he should start taking the drug, though he also said he’d ask his doctor first. Some studies are testing whether hydroxychloroquine can help prevent infections in health care workers, but none has suggested that others, such as the president, should take it to prevent infection.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.


Regina plastic company working around the clock to provide sneeze guards for retailers

“I have lots of friends, close people in the medical industry and I’m worried about them. I wouldn’t want to get up and do their job,” Maier said. “Truthfully doctors and nurses are the real heroes and we just want to help.”


Injury Crash West Of Dubois

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Idaho State Police

District 6 1540 Foote Dr.

Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402-1828

(208) 528-3400 FAX: (208) 528-3485

For Immediate Release: 6:32 p.m.

Please direct questions to the District Office

On Saturday, April 4, 2020, at 2:47 p.m., Idaho State Police investigated an injury crash westbound on SH22 at mile marker 60, west of Dubois.

John T. Williams, 22, of Monteview, was driving westbound on SH22 in a 1992 Honda Civic. Williams drove off the road, overcorrected, and the vehicle rolled.

Williams was extracted from the vehicle and transported by Air Idaho Rescue to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center. He was wearing his seatbelt.

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Injury Crash West Of Dubois

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Idaho State Police

District 6 1540 Foote Dr.

Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402-1828

(208) 528-3400 FAX: (208) 528-3485

For Immediate Release: 6:32 p.m.

Please direct questions to the District Office

On Saturday, April 4, 2020, at 2:47 p.m., Idaho State Police investigated an injury crash westbound on SH22 at mile marker 60, west of Dubois.

John T. Williams, 22, of Monteview, was driving westbound on SH22 in a 1992 Honda Civic. Williams drove off the road, overcorrected, and the vehicle rolled.

Williams was extracted from the vehicle and transported by Air Idaho Rescue to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center. He was wearing his seatbelt.

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Coronavirus: The NHS workers wearing bin bags as protection

One intensive care doctor describes the reality faced by some UK health workers on the front line.


Coronavirus: Closed visitor gardens create virtual tours

People who are at home can still get a glimpse of garden attractions even though they are closed.


Coronavirus: Flower grower donates blooms to key workers

Horticulturalist Ben Cross is working with supermarkets to donate flowers to NHS workers.


Jackson County authorities searching for missing 14-year-old boy

JACKSON COUNTY, Ala. – The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office is asking for help locating a missing 14-year-old boy.

Dominik Mangrum was last seen in Stevenson, Alabama on a blue bike with a man who goes by Chucky. Authorities believe they are traveling to Rossville, Georgia where Dominik’s biological mother lives.

The sheriff’s office said Dominik was spotted near Kimball, Tennessee getting out of the back of a black truck around 9:45 a.m. Saturday.

Anyone with information is asked to call Stevenson police at 256-437-3005, the Jackson County Sheriffs Office at 256-574-2610 or 911.


Westminster Barracks / Stalking

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   PRESS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B101537 Trooper Tyler Noyes                    STATION:  Westminster Barracks                    CONTACT#: (802) 722-4600   DATE/TIME: 04/04/2020 @ 4:24 pm INCIDENT LOCATION: East Hill Road, Andover, VT VIOLATION: Stalking   ACCUSED: David P. Guion


Coronavirus: English cricket coach in Argentina lockdown

Sian Kelly coaches the Argentine women's cricket team and has lived in Buenos Aires since 2016.


Coronavirus: 600 Hongkongers stuck in India’s lockdown as lawmaker urges aid for largest group of city residents stranded overseas

About 600 Hongkongers stuck in India – the largest known group of city residents still stranded overseas amid the coronavirus pandemic – have called for help from the city’s government with the country in the throes of its three-week lockdown, according to a lawmaker assisting them.The news emerged as 65 other residents stranded in Peru are set to arrive in Hong Kong by Sunday on chartered flights.India has been grappling with the health crisis, with more than 2,900 Covid-19 cases and over 60…


Coronavirus: Ontario long-term care homes preparing families for the worst

Global News has obtained documentation from health officials sent to long-term care homes saying seniors in nursing homes should be kept comfortable if they contract the virus and not taken to hospital.


Coronavirus: Bedford Photographer captures ‘life through windows’

Chiara Mac Call says she "waves at people" from a safe distance and takes their photo.


Update 4:Vehicle Fire Blocks EB I84@157 West of Jerome

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 4 Patrol 218 West Yakima, Jerome, ID 83338-5904 (208) 324-6000

Fax (208) 324-7897

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 5:42 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

*** Update 4 ***

On April 4, 2020, at approximately 3:00 P.M., Idaho State Police investigated a commercial vehicle fire on eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163, west of Jerome.

Allan Gumbinger, 53, of Las Vegas, NV, was driving eastbound on Interstate 84 in a 2016 Freightliner pulling one trailer. One of the tires on the trailer caught fire. The fire spread from the tire to the rest of the trailer that became fully engulfed.

Motorists were routed off of Interstate 84 at exit 157 for approximately 2 hours.

The right lane is still blocked eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163.

Idaho State Police was assisted by Jerome Rural Fire Department, Jerome County Sheriff's Office, and the Gooding County Sheriff's Office.

3642 // 3451

*** End Update ***

*** Update 3 ***

At eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 the right lane is blocked, the left lane is open. Traffic is not longer being diverted off of Interstate 84 at milepost 157.

3642

*** End Update ***

*** Update 2 ***

All eastbound lanes are open.

3642

*** End Update ***

*** Update ***

The left eastbound lane is open.

3642

*** End Update ***

Idaho State Police is on scene of a vehicle fire eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 in Jerome County. Motorists are being routed off the Interstate at exit 157 temporarily.

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04-04-20 Man arrested and charged with multiple property crimes in Kurtistown

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Criminal Investigation Section, Area I
Lieutenant Rio S. Amon-Wilkins
Phone: (808) 961-2252
Report No. 20-025966

[See image gallery at www.hawaiipolice.com]

Media Release

Hawai’i Island Police have arrested and charged a 35-year-old Hilo man with multiple property crime offenses stemming from several burglary incidents last month (March) in Kurtistown. Police have identified the individual as Sampson Davidson.

On (March 29) the suspect vehicle was observed reversed into the carport of the victim’s residence, which is currently being renovated. Upon attempting to contact the male suspect, he fled the area in his vehicle. The family member of the victim was able to get a look at the suspect and a license plate of the vehicle as it was leaving. That information was provided to the police. Davidson was later positively identified as the suspect observed at the residence and leaving in the truck.

On (April 2), shortly after 9:00 a.m., Davidson was located and arrested by Area I Special Enforcement Officers.

During this investigation, police investigators determined that Davidson had burglarized the residence and stolen from the property on more than one occasion.

Upon conferring with prosecutors, Davidson was charged with two counts of first-degree burglary, two counts of Burglary of a Dwelling during an Emergency Period, first-degree Criminal Property Damage, first-degree Theft, second-degree Theft, and Prohibited Acts Emergency Management Period.

Davidson remains in police custody in lieu of $162,000 bail. His initial court appearance is scheduled for Monday (April 6) in South Hilo District Court.        

Police want to remind the public that in light of the current COVID-19 (coronavirus) Emergency Proclamation, which was declared by Hawai’i Governor David Ige, that there are enhanced penalties for certain offenses. These offenses include, but not limited to, burglary, theft, criminal property damage, and robbery.              


No baseball in April for former Huntsville High standout Brewer Hicklen

This time of year is typically pretty busy for former Huntsville High baseball standout Brewer Hicklen. Hicklen was in the middle of spring training, gearing up for another season with the Kansas City Royals’ organization before the season was put on pause due to COVID-19.

“It’s really weird, it really is. I can’t remember the last time it was spring and I was not on the diamond. And so, I’ve really just kind of had a hard time figuring out what to do with my time,” Hicklen said. “I don’t really know how long this is gonna last, and I don’t really know how to pace myself for my training because when you are training in the offseason you know the day that you know you’re leaving, the day that you need to be ready, but I don’t want to overdo it. I don’t want to push myself too hard to where I’m burnt out, but I also don’t want to be underprepared for when they call us and say ‘Hey, you know, we need you to come out to spring training, part two.’ Baseball’s, in the grand scheme of things, just a small, small part of life, but it is something that I love to do. It’s something that I do miss greatly.”

Hicklen knows that this pandemic is impacting sports all over the world and he has some advice for the high school athletes that have also had their seasons impacted by COVID-19.

“They’re in a unique situation and there’s two ways you can look at it. Perspective is everything in life,” Hicklen said. “They can be disappointed that their season is cut short and rightfully so, I mean they’ve worked hard for that, but at the same time for them to have these, what could be two to three months off, could be one of the biggest assets to their careers moving forward. This is really an opportunity for them to prepare for their future seasons and really for an opportunity for them to get exposure down the line from colleges and pro scouts.”

Hicklen says even though we don’t know when that day will be, he knows the day he gets to step back onto the baseball field is going to be incredible.

“As soon as you get something taken away you really realize how much you miss it. So, it’s really just been a good reminder to me that I’m doing what I need to be doing and I’m pursuing my dream to play in MLB, and I’m really just grateful for the opportunity,” Hicklen said “Every day I just remind myself that I have an opportunity that people dream of having and so I’m just so grateful for that and I just try to use that to push me to help excel me into my hopefully MLB career here soon. But I’m just so thankful for that and just excited to see what the future brings is going to be. It’s gonna be starting strong, starting quick and just going out there and having a good time and representing Christ and everything I do.”


Coronavirus: ‘I missed out on furlough payments by a day’

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Community members in dinosaur costumes wish Edmonton boys happy birthday amid COVID-19 pandemic

An Edmonton mother turned to social media for help after her sons' birthday party was cancelled due to COVID-19.


Injury Crash South Of Island Park

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

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Idaho State Police

District 6 1540 Foote Dr.

Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402-1828

(208) 528-3400 FAX: (208) 528-3485

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 5:20 p.m.

Please direct questions to the District Office

On Saturday, April 4, 2020, at 8:18 a.m., Idaho State Police investigated an injury crash eastbound on US20 at mile marker 379.8, south of Island Park.

Gabriel A. Peak, 25, of Phoenix, AZ, was driving westbound on US20 in a 2011 Dodge Ram. Bryan L. Winmill, 54, of Blackfoot, was driving eastbound on US20 in a 2018 Peterbuilt semi-truck hauling a trailer. Peak crossed the center line and struck the semi-truck.

Peak was transported by ground ambulance to Madison Memorial hospital. Both drivers, as well as, Peak's child passenger were all wearing seatbelts.

Both lanes of US20 were blocked for approximately one hour until traffic control was set in place. All lanes have been reopened.

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Coronavirus: Two Pentonville Prison staff members die

The men are both thought to have been in their 60s and were support staff at Pentonville Prison.


04-04-20 Hilo woman charged with Unauthorized Control of a Propelled Vehicle

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Criminal Investigation Section, Area I
Lieutenant Rio S. Amon-Wilkins
Phone: (808) 961-2252
Report No. 20-019501

[See image gallery at www.hawaiipolice.com]

Media Release     

Hawaiʻi Island Police have charged a 34-year-old Hilo woman with Unauthorized Control of a Propelled Vehicle (UCPV) and outstanding bench warrants. She has been identified as Donna Tyau Rasay.

On Thursday afternoon (April 2), at approximately 4:30 p.m., Puna Patrol officers observed a suspicious vehicle parked at a fuel pump in Pāhoa. Upon investigating, officers determined the vehicle had been reported stolen on (March 7) at a burglary on Paradise Ala Kai Drive in Hawaiian Paradise Park.

Officers contacted Rasay, who was seated within the driver’s seat. She was subsequently arrested for UCPV and three (3) outstanding bench warrants.

The front seat passenger was also arrested for an outstanding bench warrant. He has been identified as 28-year-old Devin Lloyd Saragosa-Taoy, of Keaʻau.

Both parties were transported to the Hilo Police station while this investigation was continuing. The vehicle was recovered as evidence and towed to the Hilo Police station bending execution of a search warrant.

Upon execution of the search warrant on the vehicle, police recovered two glass smoking pipes with residue. Upon completion of laboratory testing, those cases will be forwarded to the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney.

Rasay remains in police custody in lieu of $5,000. Her initial court appearance is scheduled for Monday (April 6) in Hilo District Court.      


FW: Traffic alert – Route 102 in Canaan State of Vermont Department of Public Safety Vermont State Police VSP Derby

The roadway has reopened, please drive carefully the crash continues to be cleared.     Stephen Eddy Emergency Communications Dispatcher II CIDT Member Williston PSAP 2777 Saint George Rd Williston, VT 05495 O: 802.878.7111 / F: 802.878.3173     From: Eddy, Stephen via DPS.VSPMedia Sent: Saturday, April 4, 2020 1:11 PM To: DPS - Roadway


Coronavirus: ‘I’m digging graves for people who are still living’

As local councils prepare for coronavirus deaths, a gravedigger in Cornwall has been asked by his local parish to dig extra graves.


Coronavirus in Colorado, April 4: A look at the latest updates on COVID-19

As of Saturday the number of people in Colorado who have died from the novel coronavirus climbed to 126 people.

Gov. Jared Polis also gave an update on the need for more ventilators around the state.

The City of Denver is also in need of doing more for protecting the homeless population from the spread of the coronavirus, advocates say. As of now, Denver has no documented strategy in place to stop the spread of the virus among people who are experiencing homelessness.

The sports world is on hold and there is no telling when things will get back to normal. Friday was a reminder of this as Coors Field and surrounding blocks looked like a ghost town on a Friday that had been scheduled for opening day baseball in Denver.

Here is a current update of what we know now a month after COVID-19 started here in Colorado.

Here are the updates for April 3.

Resources

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.

The numbers

What’s new today

Live blog

Subscribe to our daily newsletter to get the latest coronavirus news sent straight to your inbox.

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


Kelowna farmers have first market of the year despite COVID-19 concerns

Markings along the ground showed proper physical distancing separation and officials would only allow 30 shoppers inside the market.


Coronavirus: How a church sings when the choir can’t meet

A church in London has found a way to create the musical experience of a service despite the coronavirus restrictions.


Update 3:Vehicle Fire Blocks EB I84@157 West of Jerome

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 4 Patrol 218 West Yakima, Jerome, ID 83338-5904 (208) 324-6000

Fax (208) 324-7897

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 4:56 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

*** Update 3 ***

At eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 the right lane is blocked, the left lane is open. Traffic is not longer being diverted off of Interstate 84 at milepost 157.

3642

*** End Update ***

*** Update 2 ***

All eastbound lanes are open.

3642

*** End Update ***

*** Update ***

The left eastbound lane is open.

3642

*** End Update ***

Idaho State Police is on scene of a vehicle fire eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 in Jerome County. Motorists are being routed off the Interstate at exit 157 temporarily.

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Update 2:Vehicle Fire Blocks EB I84@157 West of Jerome

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 4 Patrol 218 West Yakima, Jerome, ID 83338-5904 (208) 324-6000

Fax (208) 324-7897

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 4:42 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

*** Update 2 ***

All eastbound lanes are open.

3642

*** End Update ***

*** Update ***

The left eastbound lane is open.

3642

*** End Update ***

Idaho State Police is on scene of a vehicle fire eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 in Jerome County. Motorists are being routed off the Interstate at exit 157 temporarily.

3642 / 3632

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Update:Vehicle Fire Blocks EB I84@157 West of Jerome

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 4 Patrol 218 West Yakima, Jerome, ID 83338-5904 (208) 324-6000

Fax (208) 324-7897

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 4:31 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

*** Update ***

The left eastbound lane is open.

3642

*** End Update ***

Idaho State Police is on scene of a vehicle fire eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 in Jerome County. Motorists are being routed off the Interstate at exit 157 temporarily.

3642 / 3632

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Colorado confirms 126 coronavirus-related deaths as hospitalizations reach 875

At least 126 people in Colorado have died from complications of the novel coronavirus, as hospitalizations and confirmed cases continue to rise, health officials said Saturday.

The state health department says 875 people — including 52 since Friday — have been hospitalized with COVID-19, the highly infectious respiratory illness caused by the virus, while health officials confirmed 30 outbreaks at residential and nonhospital health care facilities.

The 4,565 confirmed cases come from 54 of Colorado’s 64 counties, as the virus continues to spread through the state. After weeks lamenting the state’s testing capabilities, Gov. Jared Polis said this week that testing has improved greatly, even as health officials estimate Colorado’s actual total cases are likely four to 10 times higher than is currently known.

Polis has since focused his attention on acquiring much-needed medical supplies and personal protection equipment as Colorado prepares for a feared surge in COVID-19 patients that could overwhelm its health care system.

On Friday night, the governor said on CNN that Colorado was making a deal with a manufacturer for an order of ventilators for use in the state when the Federal Emergency Management Agency swooped in and took it.

“Either be in or out,” Polis told CNN’s Don Lemon. “Either you’re buying them and you’re providing them to states and you’re letting us know what we’re going to get and when we’re going to get them. Or you stay out, and let us buy them.”

On Saturday, the governor and a collection of local government agencies released a letter addressed to Colorado’s congressional delegation in Washington, requesting $500 billion be included in the next federal stimulus package to help state and local governments fight the novel coronavirus outbreak.

“As you look toward the Phase 4 stimulus package, we stand united as state and local partners on the front lines of this crisis, urging you to include at least $500 billion in direct, robust and immediate state and local aid,” the letter says. “Absent this assistance, the state of Colorado and local governments who are directly helping Colorado’s communities respond and recover from the impacts of this public health crisis will face an unmitigated economic crisis.”


Shaftsbury Barracks/ Motor Vehicle Crash

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20B301076                                            RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Colin Shepley STATION: Shaftsbury Barracks    CONTACT#: 802-442-5421   DATE/TIME: 04/04/2020 at 1618 hours. STREET: Route 7A TOWN: Shaftsbury LANDMARK AND/OR CROSS STREETS: Cleveland


Shaftsbury Barracks/ Motor Vehicle Crash

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20B301076                                            RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Colin Shepley STATION: Shaftsbury Barracks    CONTACT#: 802-442-5421   DATE/TIME: 04/04/2020 at 1618 hours. STREET: Route 7A TOWN: Shaftsbury LANDMARK AND/OR CROSS STREETS: Cleveland


Coronavirus: Latest developments in the Greater Toronto Area on April 4

Here is a roundup of the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic in the Greater Toronto Area for Saturday.


Vehicle Fire Blocks EB I84@157 West of Jerome

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 4 Patrol 218 West Yakima, Jerome, ID 83338-5904 (208) 324-6000

Fax (208) 324-7897

For Immediate Release: 04/04/2020 3:29 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

Idaho State Police is on scene of a vehicle fire eastbound Interstate 84 at milepost 163 in Jerome County. Motorists are being routed off the Interstate at exit 157 temporarily.

3642 / 3632

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Coronavirus: 2 inmates at Mission Institution test positive for COVID-19

The 216-bed facility has been placed under lockdown to limit the spread of the virus, the union said in a statement.


Palm Sunday and the pandemic: sanitized fronds, clergy in protective garb and live streams

(CNN) — The coronavirus pandemic has challenged Christian churches to find socially distant ways to launch Holy Week on Palm Sunday.

Also known as Passion Sunday, the day recounts the biblical story of Jesus’ triumphant arrival in Jerusalem before his crucifixion, with palm leaves and clothing laid in his path. It comes on the last Sunday of Lent and first day of Holy Week.

Before the deadly pandemic’s social distancing guidelines altered life across America, Christians often celebrated with processions and the distribution of palm leaves.

So faith leaders throughout the country have come up with new ways to observe the holy day — from streaming video and audio to fronds dipped in bleach to volunteers in protective garb handing out sanitized palms to passing cars.

It won’t be an entirely palmless Sunday.

‘A branch from your yard or even some cloth’

First Christian Church in Tullahoma, Tennessee, will live stream its service on YouTube, according to its Facebook page. Palm branches will be available for pickup at the church entrance until Sunday morning.

“If you cannot pick up a palm branch, a branch from your yard or even some cloth will reflect the readings from Palm Sunday service,” the church said in one post.

“As a sign of encouragement to the community we invite you to place the palm branch or cloth on your mailbox Sunday morning.”

University of Notre Dame streams mass

The Palm Sunday mass will be streamed at 10 a.m. from the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on the FaithND website.

Palms blessed and stored for distribution at a later date

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Catholic Archbishop of New York, said in a statement that WPIX-TV will broadcast mass from Saint Patrick’s Cathedral for Palm Sunday and Easter. The mass will also be streamed on YouTube.

“We had hoped to find a way to distribute the palm, and many good suggestions were offered, but, ultimately, our medical experts told us the threat of possibly spreading the virus seemed too great,” Dolan said. “Therefore, we have asked the pastors to bless, then store, the palm until such time as we are able to once again open our churches.”

Volunteers in protective garb hand out sanitized palms

Westminster Presbyterian Church in Middleton, New Jersey, will try something different.

“Since public Worship is prohibited WPC will be delivering palm crosses in sanitized packets to some of its elderly housebound members on Sunday,” the church said in a Facebook post. “The delivery folks will be wearing Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) when dropping off the packets.”

The church will also have an hour-long, drive through “Palms & Psalms event” beginning at 11 a.m. after a virtual service. Church leaders and volunteers in protective garb will distribute “sanitized palms” to passing cars while supplies last.

‘Any green branch’ on a door or window ‘will do’

The Catholic Diocese of Camden in New Jersey is keeping it simple.

“On Palm Sunday, since we will be unable to receive our beloved palms at Mass, let us all put a branch on the door or window of our home to celebrate,” the diocese said in a Facebook post. “It doesn’t need to be a palm, any green branch will do.”

Downloadable palm fronds and real palms dipped in bleach

The Episcopal Diocese of Iowa offers ideas for observing Holy Week at home. The main service at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral will available on diocese’s Facebook and YouTube pages and on its website.

The page includes a downloadable palm frond to color and hang in the window.

At Trinity Episcopal Church in Waterloo, Iowa, Rev. Stephanie Moncrieff will hold Sunday’s service in the parking lot, the official Episcopal News Service reported.

Her congregation will attend in their cars — windows rolled up — as the service is broadcast via teleconference.

Moncrieff, wearing a mask and gloves, will dip palms in a bleach solution before distributing them, the news service reported. The palms, folded into crosses, will be taped to windows of cars before a procession on wheels through town.

No drive-through palms in Miami

Miami Archbishop Thomas Wenski said there would be no confessions or palms.

“It is not prudent for parishes to plan any activity that would encourage people to leave their homes,” Wenski wrote in a letter to Catholic parishes. “Therefore, parishes are not to offer ‘drive-through’ palms, confessions or holy Communion or any similar type of activity.”

Catholics in the diocese could place a palm frond on their door since “most yards in South Florida have some type of palm in them,” Wenski wrote.

Most parishes will be live streaming Holy Week and Easter services, the archdiocese said on its website Friday in a post titled, “Holy Week has not been canceled.”


Newsom says Stanford test for coronavirus immunity in California ‘hours’ from approval

A new immunity test from Stanford University and an increased focus on screening for coronavirus will help the state dramatically ramp up testing over the next few weeks, Gov. Gavin … Click to Continue »


Coronavirus: Civil liberties advocates urge people to remain vigilant about their rights

Montreal-based human rights lawyer Pearl Eliadis said despite the emergency orders, "the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms has not disappeared."


Feds direct airlines to refund passengers for canceled flights

(CNN) — Federal officials on Friday ordered airlines to reimburse customers for canceled flights, saying a growing number of passengers are complaining amid the coronavirus pandemic that airlines are providing travel credits rather than refunds.

The US Department of Transportation did not say how many claims it has substantiated, but it did direct carriers in an enforcement notice “that passengers should be refunded promptly when their scheduled flights are cancelled or significantly delayed.”

The government said it would “exercise its prosecutorial discretion” and allow airlines time to contact customers, update policies and properly train staff.

“The Department is receiving an increasing number of complaints and inquiries from ticketed passengers, including many with non-refundable tickets, who describe having been denied refunds for flights that were cancelled or significantly delayed,” the notice read.

Customers are allowed to receive a refund when airlines cancel or significantly delay flights. The requirements also apply when government restrictions prohibit flying, the notice said.

The rules do not apply to customers who decide on their own against flying because, for example, of concern over the coronavirus.

Airlines canceled significant portions of their schedules as demand plummeted. By late February, customers were canceling more flights than they were booking, according to the industry group Airlines for America.

Now, industry metrics show carriers are flying about half their schedules and only about 1 in 10 seats are filled.

The mass cancellations mean airlines owe customers a substantial amount. Worldwide, airlines owe their customers $35 billion in refunds and credits this financial quarter, according to the International Air Transport Association. Different regions have different refund and credit requirements.

The Transportation Department notice said many passengers complained of receiving credit toward future flights that cannot be used because of the deep schedule cuts, which extend into the fall.

“As a result, passengers are left with cancelled or significantly delayed flights and vouchers and credits for future travel that are not readily usable,” the notice said.

Many airline vouchers expire after a year. Delta announced earlier on Friday it would accept coronavirus-related flight credits for about two years, until the end of May 2022.

A different US agency, the Federal Trade Commission, has received more than 1,600 travel- and vacation-related complaints so far linked to the coronavirus, according to FTC data reviewed by CNN. Those complaints, including from people seeking their money back on nonrefundable travel, claim losses of $2.7 million.

DOT noted that carriers provided refunds, as required, after incidents including the September 11, 2001, terror attacks.

“Although the COVID-19 public health emergency has had an unprecedented impact on air travel, the airlines’ obligation to refund passengers for cancelled or significantly delayed flights remains unchanged,” the agency said.


Coronavirus: Montreal Symphony Orchestra maestro Kent Nagano, family self-isolated in Paris

The OSM music director is self-isolated in Paris with his wife and daughter during COVID-19 outbreak.


Montreal-based companies ramping up medical supplies to fight COVID-19

As concerns grow about limited supplies of personal protective equipment from 3M in the U.S. -- two Montreal-based companies are ramping up production to try and meet demand.


Coronavirus: Halifax taxi driver describes hit to industry, safety measures in place

"After every call we're doing a wipe over. A spray with Lysol, or with disinfectant wipes and at least four or five times in 12 hours we're doing a very thorough wipe down."


Coronavirus: 4 dead, 14 residents with COVID-19 symptoms at East York long-term care home

Seven staff members have also tested positive for COVID-19, all of whom are now in self-isolation.


Hunt for medical supplies creates marketplace of desperation

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Scams Targeting Seniors Amidst Coronavirus Pandemic

BBB is receiving several reports from seniors reporting that they are receiving text messages from scammers posing as the U.S. Department of Health, about taking a mandatory online COVID-19 test in order to receive the recently approved stimulus payment. Others are receiving emails stating they qualify for a payment and to click on a link to claim a check. During this time of uncertainty, it is the ideal time for a scammer to prey on fear. The bottom-line is don’t respond to a text, email or phone call from a sender that is unfamiliar, even if it looks official or from a respected agency.

These schemes often manifest as someone impersonating a respected agency or government entity, like the Social Security Administration or police, insisting a potential victim act immediately or face consequences. In fact, a research report released by the Better Business Bureau, FINRA Investor Education Foundation, and the Stanford Center on Longevity found that the top reason people said they lose money was because the scammer “seemed official.”

Seniors aged 65 and over reported losing a median of $350 last year when falling victim to a scam – which is more than double the loss across all age groups ($160). However, seniors 65 and older are more likely to walk away from a scam and avoid financial loss, with one in four seniors reporting a loss this past year (versus one in three across all ages).

With the current coronavirus pandemic, scammers will constantly change their tactics to catch people off guard. Here are some tips for seniors to protect against scams:

  • Don’t be afraid to contact someone. Reach out to a family member, neighbor, or a company or organization you trust for advice. Research shows that individuals that are living alone, widowed, or those feeling isolated from others are more likely to engage with and lose money to scammers. If a scammer tries to keep you on the phone or rush you to a decision, hang up and ask someone for advice.
  • Avoid “miracle” product claims that can protect you or your home from disease. Companies targeting older consumers with products and services claiming to protect from diseases like COVID-19 are shams without a proven cure. Don’t just believe testimonials on a company’s website; instead, research the company and product through trusted organizations like the Better Business Bureau.
  • Be wary of offers sounding too good to be true. They won’t help you get ahead. Scammers look for individuals looking to “catch up” or “get ahead” financially, and if your retirement was affected by the market’s ups and downs – don’t panic. Periods of high emotion are rarely the right time to re-evaluate your financial future. Instead, take a deep breath and contact a trustworthy broker or financial advisor.
  • Be smart and aware. Knowing about the scams out there significantly reduces the likelihood of financial loss. When someone contacts you about an “amazing opportunity,” it’s easier to separate fact from fiction.

Learn more about COVID-19 scams at BBB.org/coronavirus, and review reports from other consumers at BBB.org/ScamTracker. You can help protect your friends and family by passing on what you’ve learned!

Source: BBB.org


Bridgeport police charge 3 with illegal dumping

Bridgeport police issued misdemeanor summons’ to three people last month on illegal dumping charges.


Saskatchewan reports 11 new cases of COVID-19, bringing total to 231

There have been seven more recoveries from COVID-19 bringing the total number of recoveries to 55. 


Coronavirus: 2 more residents die at Ontario nursing home

The coronavirus outbreak at a Bobcaygeon, Ont., nursing home has claimed the lives of another two residents, officials said Saturday.


Saskatchewan real estate market records highest residential sales in 2 years

Residential sales across Saskatchewan increased significantly in March compared to the same period in the last two years, even amid the COVID-19 health crisis.


Montreal’s Jewish community feels targeted during coronavirus crisis

Montreal's Jewish community complains it is being unfairly targeted during the COVID-19 crisis, with too much blame being laid on the community.


Law enforcement agencies work together to arrest attempted murder suspect.

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

DO NOT REPLY

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 3 Patrol 700 S. Stratford Dr., Meridian 83642

(208) 884-7122

Fax (208) 846-7520

For Immediate Release: 4/4/2020 1:00PM

Please direct questions to Tecia Ferguson, PIO

Early this morning, officers from Idaho State Police, the Adams County Sheriff's Office, the Valley County Sheriff's Office and the McCall Police Department arrested Williams "Bill" Pearle James near his parent's home in New Meadows.

Law enforcement agencies have been working together to locate James, who is wanted for attempted murder after shooting at Adams County Deputies. The deputies were responding to a call for assistance from James' family after he violated a protection order. James also shot at an Idaho Fish and Game Officer, who was in the area and stopped to assist the deputies.

Captain Matt Sly, with the Idaho State Police, said, "The mission of the Idaho State Police, like many of the agencies here is safety, and we're all committed and working to keep people safe. We are grateful for all the officers who responded and that we were able to take James into custody today. Now the people in New Meadows can feel safe in their homes, knowing Mr. James won't continue to be a threat."

ISP credits the successful apprehension of Mr. James to the continued and extensive cooperation between many agencies. ISP troopers, as well as personnel and equipment from several local, state, and federal agencies, have been in the area since Monday. Agencies involved included: Idaho State Police, Owyhee County Sheriff, Canyon County Sheriff, Meridian Police Dept., Valley County Sheriff, McCall Police Dept. Washington County Sheriff, the Spokane County Sheriff's Office, Idaho Fish and Game, the US Forest Service, and the US Marshall's Office.

We are grateful for all the agencies who assisted this week. Due to his actions, Mr. James posed a threat to the public, and it was important to arrest him as soon as possible before he had a chance to hurt anyone. We wouldn't have been able to do it without the assistance of several other agencies and working together we made this happen, said ISP Captain Matt Sly.

Mr. James was arrested without incident and transported to the Adams County Jail.

-------------


Saskatchewan premier calls Trump’s decision to stop exporting N95 masks to Canada ‘reckless’

"This decision is nothing short of a betrayal of our two great nations shared history of working together in times of need," Moe said at a news conference Friday.


Via Rail employee tests positive for COVID-19, possibly infecting 3 others

On Saturday morning, Via Rail Canada announced one of its maintenance centre employees tested positive for the novel coronavirus.


Missouri doctor buys camper to live in to protect her family from COVID-19

CREVE COUER, Mo. (KMOV) — Dr. Tiffany Osborn said she’s taking an extreme precaution to keep her family protected from COVID-19.

“We decided the best course of action was for me to isolate myself from them once I started working in the emergency department,” said Dr. Osborn.

She, like many St. Louis doctors, is on the front line combating COVID-19.

“I work in both groups, the emergency department and the ICU on a regular basis,” she said.

The Washington University doctor and her husband decided to shift money planned for a home extension toward buying a camper.

“So our extension is now the camper that I’m living in,” Osborn said.

She said when she gets home from work, she goes directly to her camper to clean and sanitize before coming outside to sit on the camper steps to speak to her family.

News 4 has learned that local hospitals are stepping in to keep medical professional families safe from COVID-19.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital is working to offer alternative housing for healthcare workers. SLU Hospital is offering housing in one of their dorms for medical professionals to rest and recuperate after a long day.

“It was one of those things where we don’t have enough information to feel completely safe and we just want to make sure the family was protected,” Osborn said.


Coronavirus: Five London bus workers die, union confirms

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Gov. Gavin Newsom gave an update on California’s efforts to combat the coronavirus Saturday. In the address, Newsom unveiled plans to address the state’s COVID-19 testing backlog with the launch … Click to Continue »


VSP-St Johnsbury/ATE and Gross Neg Operation

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A401714 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: SGT Lyle Decker                             STATION: VSP-St Johnsbury                     CONTACT#: (802) 748-3111   DATE/TIME: 1845 hours on 4/3/20 INCIDENT LOCATION: East Rd/South Bayley Hazen Rd, Ryegate, VT VIOLATION:


Coronavirus: B.C. health officials provide Saturday update on COVID-19

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry is expected to announce the latest number of COVID-19 cases across B.C., along with information on testing.


Coronavirus: Experts caution against the ‘inexact science’ of COVID-19 modelling

Pandemic experts say such projections are not really meant to predict the future, but rather to provide a general guide for policy-makers and health-care systems grappling with a growing pandemic.


WATCH SOON: Doctors answer your questions on ‘Coronavirus House Calls’ | April 4-5

Have a question about COVID-19? Email the question, your name, and your city to our doctors at coronaquestions@nexstar.tv to have it answered on “Coronavirus House Calls.” Watch the next episode RIGHT HERE on Saturday, April 4 at 3 p.m. CT!


CBS 42’s Art Franklin

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — The number of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in the U.S. may be growing exponentially, but we want to look beyond statistics. We’re here to talk about your concerns, differentiate between fact and fiction, and move from fear to hope.

That’s why we’ve assembled a panel of the nation’s top doctors to answer your biggest questions about COVID-19 in the Nexstar digital original, “Coronavirus House Calls” hosted by Emmy award-winning CBS 42 Anchor Art Franklin.

[WATCH: Coronavirus House Calls | March 28-29]

If you have a fever or cough, you might have COVID-19. Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home. Keep track of your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), get medical attention right away.

MEET THE DOCTORS

Dr. Anand Parekh, MD (Washington, D.C.)
Medical policy advisor, clinical and public health expert


Ananda Parekh (Photo by Greg Gibson)

Anand Parekh is the Bipartisan Policy Center’s chief medical advisor providing clinical and public health expertise across the organization. Since 2015, he has led specific efforts tackling a variety of policy issues including the opioid crisis, obesity epidemic & nutrition, health & housing, domestic and global HIV/AIDS, business & public health collaboration, emergency preparedness, social isolation, rural health, and prescription drug costs.

Prior to joining BPC, he completed a decade of service at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). As a HHS deputy assistant secretary for health from 2008 to 2015, he developed and implemented national initiatives focused on prevention, wellness, and care management. Specifically, he played instrumental roles in the implementation of the Recovery Act’s Prevention and Wellness Fund, the Affordable Care Act’s prevention initiatives, and HHS’ Multiple Chronic Conditions Initiative.

Briefly in 2007, he was delegated the authorities of the assistant secretary for health overseeing ten health program offices and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. Earlier in his HHS career, he played key roles in public health emergency preparedness efforts related to pandemic influenza and bioterrorism as special assistant to the science advisor to the secretary.

Parekh is a board-certified internal medicine physician, a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where he previously completed his residency training in the Osler Medical Program of the Department of Medicine. He provided volunteer clinical services for many years at the Holy Cross Hospital Health Center, a clinic for the uninsured in Silver Spring, MD.

Parekh is an adjunct professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He currently serves on the dean’s advisory board of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, the Presidential Scholars Foundation board of directors, and the board of directors of WaterAid America.

He has spoken widely and written extensively on a variety of health topics such as chronic care management, population health, value in health care, and the need for health and human services integration. His book Prevention First: Policymaking for a Healthier America was released in December 2019 and argues that prevention must be our nation’s top health policy priority.

A native of Michigan, Parekh received a B.A. in political science, an M.D., and an M.P.H. in health management and policy from the University of Michigan. He was selected as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in 1994.

Follow Dr. Parekh on Twitter, and learn more about his work at the Bipartisan Policy Center.


Dr. Ashish Jha MD, MPH (Cambridge, MA)
Physician, renowned health policy researcher

Ashish Jha, M.D., MPH, is the K.T. Li Professor of Global Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute. He is a practicing General Internist and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jha received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and then trained in Internal Medicine at the University of California in San Francisco. He completed his General Medicine fellowship at Brigham & Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School and received his M.P.H. from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research endeavors focus on improving the quality and costs of healthcare systems with a specialized focus on the impact of policies. Dr. Jha has published over two hundred various papers in prestigious journals and heads a personal blog, which focuses on using statistical data research to improve health quality. Dr. Jha is a member of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Follow Dr. Jha on Twitter, and check out Dr. Jha’s website for more information.


Dr. Jorge E. Rodriguez, MD (Los Angeles, CA)
Internist, gastroenterologist, HIV researcher

Jorge E. Rodriguez M.D (“Dr. Jorge”) is a medical doctor with a specialization in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterologist. Born in Cuba but raised in Miami and New York City, Dr. Jorge is bilingual in English and Spanish. He graduated from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine with honors. He obtained his specialty in Internal Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans and his subspecialty in Gastroenterologist at Baylor Medical Center in Dallas. Since then Dr. Jorge has developed an international reputation as a leader in Internal Medicine and as a researcher in Hepatitis C and HIV therapies. He is the proud author of two best-selling books: The Acid Reflux Solution and The Diabetes Solution. Dr. Jorge can often be found as a medical expert on various media outlets including CNN, The Doctors, The View, The Today Show and many others.

Follow Dr. Jorge on Twitter and on Facebook, and check out Dr. Jorge’s website for more information on his private practice.


Dr. Marcalee Alexander, MD (Hoover, AL)
Rehabilitation medicine and telemedicine specialist

Marcalee Alexander graduated Jefferson Medical College where she also completed her residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She has a strong background in Spinal Cord Injury and was the first female president of the American Spinal Injury Association. She has published over 125 professional manuscripts and has served as the editor of the journal Spinal Cord Series and Cases since 2017.

Most of her research has focused on sexuality and she is an expert on the impact of neurologic disorders on sexual response. She is the author of the ebook: Sexual Sustainability, A Guide to Having a Great Sex Life with a Spinal Cord Disorder. Dr. Alexander is a Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is also a leader in telerehabilitation and runs a sexuality telehealth clinic at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Alexander is passionate about the issues of persons with disabilities and how they are impacted by disasters. She took a hiatus from the full-time practice of medicine in 2019 and began a walk from Canada to Key West down roads of the US to bring attention to the issues of accessibility and quality of life for persons with disabilities and educate both professionals and communities. During this time, she launched the first Day for Tomorrow, a day when people can come together in community to prepare for disasters.

Dr. Alexander also started a nonprofit called Telerehabilitation International, with a mission to create a volunteer network of rehabilitation physicians to provide telemedicine consults for persons with disabilities in disaster areas. Telerehabilitation International is also partnering with other groups to organize a summit to be held in 2021 with a goal of bringing together leaders from the disability field and the climate change field. Sustain Our Abilities is the name of the summit and is also the name of an online visual anthology dedicated to bringing attention to the stories of people with disabilities.

Follow Dr. Alexander on Twitter and Facebook.


Dr. Michael Saag, MD (Birmingham, AL)
Infectious disease specialist, renowned HIV/AIDS researcher

Dr. Saag received a B.S. in chemistry with honors in 1977 Tulane University, earned his medical degree with honors from the University of Louisville, and completed his residency and infectious disease and molecular virology fellowship training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. During the last 6 months of his fellowship, Dr. Saag conceived the concept of a comprehensive HIV outpatient (1917) clinic dedicated to the provision of interdisciplinary patient care in conjunction with the conduct of high quality clinical trials, translational science, and clinical outcomes research.  Within the clinic structure, he established a clinical trials unit, a data management center, and a Clinical Specimen Repository designed to support the activities of the newly established Center for AIDS Research at UAB. In essence, the clinic became a “hub” for the clinical, basic science, and behavioral science investigators within the Center by creating a dynamic interface between the patients and the investigators.

Dr. Saag has participated in many studies of antiretroviral therapy as well as novel treatments for opportunistic infections. He has published over 450 articles in peer reviewed journals, including the first description of the use of viral load in clinical practice (Science, 1993), the first description of the rapid dynamics of viral replication (Nature, 1995), the first guidelines for use of viral load in practice (Nature Medicine, 1996), the first proof of concept of fusion inhibition as a therapeutic option (Nature Medicine, 1998), and directed the ‘first-in- patient’ studies of 7 of the 30 antiretroviral drugs currently on the market. 

Dr. Saag Co-Edited a textbook entitled AIDS Therapy (now in its 3rd edition) and currently serves as an Editor of the Sanford Guide for Antimicrobial Agents and the Sanford HIV Guide. Dr. Saag serves on the International AIDS Society-USA Board of Directors, is a Past-President of the HIV Medical Association, is Chair of the IAS-USA Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines panel, was a founding Co-Chair of the AASLD / IDSA Hepatitis C Guidelines Panel, and a past-member of the HHS Guidelines Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and the WHO Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines panel.

In 2014, he was the Castle-Connolly National Physician of the Year and was inducted into the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame. An accomplished teacher, Dr. Saag has been awarded Argus awards annually by the UAB medical students as Best Lecturer in the Patient, Doctor, and Society module. Dr. Saag recently published a memoir entitled “Positive: One doctor’s encounters with death, life, and the US Healthcare system,” now in its second printing.

Follow Dr. Saag on Twitter.


WATCH SOON: Doctors answer your questions on ‘Coronavirus House Calls’ | April 4-5

Have a question about COVID-19? Email the question, your name, and your city to our doctors at coronaquestions@nexstar.tv to have it answered on “Coronavirus House Calls.” Watch the next episode RIGHT HERE on Saturday, April 4 at 3 p.m. CT!


CBS 42’s Art Franklin

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — The number of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in the U.S. may be growing exponentially, but we want to look beyond statistics. We’re here to talk about your concerns, differentiate between fact and fiction, and move from fear to hope.

That’s why we’ve assembled a panel of the nation’s top doctors to answer your biggest questions about COVID-19 in the Nexstar digital original, “Coronavirus House Calls” hosted by Emmy award-winning CBS 42 Anchor Art Franklin.

[WATCH: Coronavirus House Calls | March 28-29]

If you have a fever or cough, you might have COVID-19. Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home. Keep track of your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), get medical attention right away.

MEET THE DOCTORS

Dr. Anand Parekh, MD (Washington, D.C.)
Medical policy advisor, clinical and public health expert


Ananda Parekh (Photo by Greg Gibson)

Anand Parekh is the Bipartisan Policy Center’s chief medical advisor providing clinical and public health expertise across the organization. Since 2015, he has led specific efforts tackling a variety of policy issues including the opioid crisis, obesity epidemic & nutrition, health & housing, domestic and global HIV/AIDS, business & public health collaboration, emergency preparedness, social isolation, rural health, and prescription drug costs.

Prior to joining BPC, he completed a decade of service at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). As a HHS deputy assistant secretary for health from 2008 to 2015, he developed and implemented national initiatives focused on prevention, wellness, and care management. Specifically, he played instrumental roles in the implementation of the Recovery Act’s Prevention and Wellness Fund, the Affordable Care Act’s prevention initiatives, and HHS’ Multiple Chronic Conditions Initiative.

Briefly in 2007, he was delegated the authorities of the assistant secretary for health overseeing ten health program offices and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. Earlier in his HHS career, he played key roles in public health emergency preparedness efforts related to pandemic influenza and bioterrorism as special assistant to the science advisor to the secretary.

Parekh is a board-certified internal medicine physician, a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where he previously completed his residency training in the Osler Medical Program of the Department of Medicine. He provided volunteer clinical services for many years at the Holy Cross Hospital Health Center, a clinic for the uninsured in Silver Spring, MD.

Parekh is an adjunct professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He currently serves on the dean’s advisory board of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, the Presidential Scholars Foundation board of directors, and the board of directors of WaterAid America.

He has spoken widely and written extensively on a variety of health topics such as chronic care management, population health, value in health care, and the need for health and human services integration. His book Prevention First: Policymaking for a Healthier America was released in December 2019 and argues that prevention must be our nation’s top health policy priority.

A native of Michigan, Parekh received a B.A. in political science, an M.D., and an M.P.H. in health management and policy from the University of Michigan. He was selected as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in 1994.

Follow Dr. Parekh on Twitter, and learn more about his work at the Bipartisan Policy Center.


Dr. Ashish Jha MD, MPH (Cambridge, MA)
Physician, renowned health policy researcher

Ashish Jha, M.D., MPH, is the K.T. Li Professor of Global Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute. He is a practicing General Internist and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jha received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and then trained in Internal Medicine at the University of California in San Francisco. He completed his General Medicine fellowship at Brigham & Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School and received his M.P.H. from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research endeavors focus on improving the quality and costs of healthcare systems with a specialized focus on the impact of policies. Dr. Jha has published over two hundred various papers in prestigious journals and heads a personal blog, which focuses on using statistical data research to improve health quality. Dr. Jha is a member of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Follow Dr. Jha on Twitter, and check out Dr. Jha’s website for more information.


Dr. Jorge E. Rodriguez, MD (Los Angeles, CA)
Internist, gastroenterologist, HIV researcher

Jorge E. Rodriguez M.D (“Dr. Jorge”) is a medical doctor with a specialization in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterologist. Born in Cuba but raised in Miami and New York City, Dr. Jorge is bilingual in English and Spanish. He graduated from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine with honors. He obtained his specialty in Internal Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans and his subspecialty in Gastroenterologist at Baylor Medical Center in Dallas. Since then Dr. Jorge has developed an international reputation as a leader in Internal Medicine and as a researcher in Hepatitis C and HIV therapies. He is the proud author of two best-selling books: The Acid Reflux Solution and The Diabetes Solution. Dr. Jorge can often be found as a medical expert on various media outlets including CNN, The Doctors, The View, The Today Show and many others.

Follow Dr. Jorge on Twitter and on Facebook, and check out Dr. Jorge’s website for more information on his private practice.


Dr. Marcalee Alexander, MD (Hoover, AL)
Rehabilitation medicine and telemedicine specialist

Marcalee Alexander graduated Jefferson Medical College where she also completed her residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She has a strong background in Spinal Cord Injury and was the first female president of the American Spinal Injury Association. She has published over 125 professional manuscripts and has served as the editor of the journal Spinal Cord Series and Cases since 2017.

Most of her research has focused on sexuality and she is an expert on the impact of neurologic disorders on sexual response. She is the author of the ebook: Sexual Sustainability, A Guide to Having a Great Sex Life with a Spinal Cord Disorder. Dr. Alexander is a Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is also a leader in telerehabilitation and runs a sexuality telehealth clinic at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Alexander is passionate about the issues of persons with disabilities and how they are impacted by disasters. She took a hiatus from the full-time practice of medicine in 2019 and began a walk from Canada to Key West down roads of the US to bring attention to the issues of accessibility and quality of life for persons with disabilities and educate both professionals and communities. During this time, she launched the first Day for Tomorrow, a day when people can come together in community to prepare for disasters.

Dr. Alexander also started a nonprofit called Telerehabilitation International, with a mission to create a volunteer network of rehabilitation physicians to provide telemedicine consults for persons with disabilities in disaster areas. Telerehabilitation International is also partnering with other groups to organize a summit to be held in 2021 with a goal of bringing together leaders from the disability field and the climate change field. Sustain Our Abilities is the name of the summit and is also the name of an online visual anthology dedicated to bringing attention to the stories of people with disabilities.

Follow Dr. Alexander on Twitter and Facebook.


Dr. Michael Saag, MD (Birmingham, AL)
Infectious disease specialist, renowned HIV/AIDS researcher

Dr. Saag received a B.S. in chemistry with honors in 1977 Tulane University, earned his medical degree with honors from the University of Louisville, and completed his residency and infectious disease and molecular virology fellowship training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. During the last 6 months of his fellowship, Dr. Saag conceived the concept of a comprehensive HIV outpatient (1917) clinic dedicated to the provision of interdisciplinary patient care in conjunction with the conduct of high quality clinical trials, translational science, and clinical outcomes research.  Within the clinic structure, he established a clinical trials unit, a data management center, and a Clinical Specimen Repository designed to support the activities of the newly established Center for AIDS Research at UAB. In essence, the clinic became a “hub” for the clinical, basic science, and behavioral science investigators within the Center by creating a dynamic interface between the patients and the investigators.

Dr. Saag has participated in many studies of antiretroviral therapy as well as novel treatments for opportunistic infections. He has published over 450 articles in peer reviewed journals, including the first description of the use of viral load in clinical practice (Science, 1993), the first description of the rapid dynamics of viral replication (Nature, 1995), the first guidelines for use of viral load in practice (Nature Medicine, 1996), the first proof of concept of fusion inhibition as a therapeutic option (Nature Medicine, 1998), and directed the ‘first-in- patient’ studies of 7 of the 30 antiretroviral drugs currently on the market. 

Dr. Saag Co-Edited a textbook entitled AIDS Therapy (now in its 3rd edition) and currently serves as an Editor of the Sanford Guide for Antimicrobial Agents and the Sanford HIV Guide. Dr. Saag serves on the International AIDS Society-USA Board of Directors, is a Past-President of the HIV Medical Association, is Chair of the IAS-USA Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines panel, was a founding Co-Chair of the AASLD / IDSA Hepatitis C Guidelines Panel, and a past-member of the HHS Guidelines Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and the WHO Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines panel.

In 2014, he was the Castle-Connolly National Physician of the Year and was inducted into the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame. An accomplished teacher, Dr. Saag has been awarded Argus awards annually by the UAB medical students as Best Lecturer in the Patient, Doctor, and Society module. Dr. Saag recently published a memoir entitled “Positive: One doctor’s encounters with death, life, and the US Healthcare system,” now in its second printing.

Follow Dr. Saag on Twitter.


Grand Princess crew ends quarantine; ship to sail out to sea

Nearly 650 crew members of the Grand Princess completed their 14-day quarantine Saturday, ending a nearly month-long period of self-isolation that began when the cruise ship was struck with the … Click to Continue »


“Either be in or out”: Feds swooped in on Colorado’s ventilator order, Polis says

Colorado was making a deal with a manufacturer for an order of much-needed ventilators when the Federal Emergency Management Agency swooped in and took it themselves, Gov. Jared Polis told CNN on Friday night.

It was one thing for states to be competing among themselves for vital resources to fight the novel coronavirus, Polis said. Now they’re competing against the federal government, too.

“Either be in or out,” Polis told CNN’s Don Lemon. “Either you’re buying them and you’re providing them to states and you’re letting us know what we’re going to get and when we’re going to get them. Or you stay out, and let us buy them.”

Prior to Polis’ comments, CNN reported that Colorado had an order canceled for 500 ventilators, among other supplies, because the items were being bought by FEMA. A congressional source told CNN that Colorado was told it was not on the priority list and the state would have to find its own supplies.

“We can’t compete against our own federal government,” Polis said. “So either work with us, or don’t do anything at all. But this middle ground where they’re buying stuff out from under us and not telling us what we’re going to get, that’s really challenging to manage our hospital surge and our safety of our health care workers in that kind of environment.”

On Saturday, the governor and a collection of local government agencies released a letter addressed to Colorado’s congressional delegation in Washington, requesting $500 billion be included in the next federal stimulus package to help state and local governments fight the novel coronavirus outbreak.

“As you look toward the Phase 4 stimulus package, we stand united as state and local partners on the front lines of this crisis, urging you to include at least $500 billion in direct, robust and immediate State and local aid,” the letter says. “Absent this assistance, the State of Colorado and local governments who are directly helping Colorado’s communities respond and recover from the impacts of this public health crisis, will face an unmitigated economic crisis,” the letter reads.

Earlier this week Polis released a letter he sent to Vice President Mike Pence, in which he pleaded for more personal protection equipment and ventilators from the federal government.

He said Wednesday that Colorado would be going to China itself, working out orders for masks, face shields, ventilators and other essential medical supplies as the state stocks up for a surge in COVID-19 patients.

On Friday, the governor recommended anyone leaving their homes to walk around the neighborhood or grocery shop should now be wearing non-medical face masks, the same day state health officials reported 111 deaths connected to COVID-19, with another 823 people hospitalized.



Amid virus, California moved slowly on nursing student rules

Fearing an out-of-control coronavirus outbreak would overwhelm California's health care system, Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide emergency on March 4. Within a week dozens of nursing schools pleaded with … Click to Continue »


6-year-old Tennessee boy with cystic fibrosis beats COVID-19

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (WTVO) A 6-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis tested positive for COVID-19. But in a viral video posted on his mothers Facebook page, he is spreading some hope and positivity.

Joseph Bostain happily announced that he beat the deadly virus.

According to his mother, Sabrina, Joseph was quarantined in their Clarksville home after coming down with a fever and cough. He was then taken to Monroe Carroll Jr. Children’s Hospital.

In the viral video Jospeh is seen saying,“I’m a cystic fibrosis warrior and I beat COVID-19!”
His mother thanked the outpour of support she’s received from other community members.


‘I’ve got the illness’: B.C. ER doctor on life with COVID-19 and what comes next

A B.C. emergency doctor is sharing his experience of living with COVID-19.


Coronavirus: Ontario to issue 2nd COVID-19 emergency alert on Saturday

Ontario will send a second emergency alert regarding the COVID-19 pandemic on Saturday, a week after the first alert which was aimed at travellers.


VSP Williston – Agg. Disorderly Conduct//Negligent Operation//Reckless Endangerment

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A101509 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Nicole Twamley                              STATION: VSP Williston Barracks                     CONTACT#: (802)-878-7111   DATE/TIME: 04/01/2020 // 0703 Hours INCIDENT LOCATION: VT RTE 15 & Browns Trace


VSP Williston – Agg. Disorderly Conduct//Negligent Operation//Reckless Endangerment

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A101509 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Nicole Twamley                              STATION: VSP Williston Barracks                     CONTACT#: (802)-878-7111   DATE/TIME: 04/01/2020 // 0703 Hours INCIDENT LOCATION: VT RTE 15 & Browns Trace


Former employee of Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Office dies after falling from residential building

A former press officer at the Chief Executive Office plunged from a residential building to his death on Saturday afternoon, the Hong Kong government has confirmed.The suicide came five days after the 32-year-old, surnamed Tam, resigned from his job. In a statement, the Information Services Department said it felt deep regret over the death, adding it would offer all possible support to his family.The Chief Executive Office also expressed shock and sorrow at the incident.According to police, a…


Homicide: 3400 Block of 22nd Street, Southeast

Saturday, April 4, 2020

 

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch are investigating a homicide that occurred on Friday, April 3, 2020, in the 3400 block of 22nd Street, Southeast.

 

At approximately 6:50 pm, members of the Seventh District responded to the listed location for the report of a shooting. Upon arrival, officers located an adult male suffering from a gunshot wound. DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene and transported the victim to a local hospital for treatment. After all life-saving efforts failed, the victim was pronounced dead. Additionally, officers located a juvenile male victim receiving treatment at another local hospital for a non-life threatening gunshot wound.

 

The decedent has been identified as 28 year-old David Deandre Young, of Clinton, MD.

 

The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up to $25,000 to anyone that provides information which leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for any homicide committed in the District of Columbia. Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the police at 202-727-9099. Additionally, anonymous information may be submitted to the department’s TEXT TIP LINE by sending a text message to 50411.


13 Nonprofits Receive Initial Grants From Lincoln COVID-19 Response Fund

Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird today announced that the Lincoln COVID-19 Response Fund has distributed $189,000 in grants to 13 local nonprofit organizations. She said the grants are a coordinated first response to provide immediate economic stability and meet the basic needs of Lincoln residents, including access to food, housing, medical information, and other support.


FW: Traffic alert – Route 102 in Canaan State of Vermont Department of Public Safety Vermont State Police VSP Derby

Press Release – Highway / Traffic Notification   Route 102 in Canaan, south of the intersection with Todd Hill Rd is closed due to a motor vehicle accident.   This incident is expected to last until further notice. Specific details are not yet available and updates will be provided as appropriate. Motorists should expect delays in the area, or seek alternate routes. Please drive


FW: Traffic alert – Route 102 in Canaan State of Vermont Department of Public Safety Vermont State Police VSP Derby

Press Release – Highway / Traffic Notification   Route 102 in Canaan, south of the intersection with Todd Hill Rd is closed due to a motor vehicle accident.   This incident is expected to last until further notice. Specific details are not yet available and updates will be provided as appropriate. Motorists should expect delays in the area, or seek alternate routes. Please drive


Premier League warns PFA of £762m penalty if season is voided

The Premier League faces a £762m financial penalty if the season does not resume, players have been told.


Coronavirus: Market Harborough man home after virus fight

Hylton Murray-Philipson goes home after 12 days in hospital battling the virus.


Virtual Grand National 2020: Potters Corner wins televised race

A televised computer-animated version of the Grand National, cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic, is won by 18-1 shot Potters Corner.


Hong Kong councillor warned for refusing to help Yuen Long residents who support national security law

A district councillor in Hong Kong who publicly declared his refusal to help residents endorsing national security legislation has been warned he could be in breach of rules governing politicians’ conduct.Lam Chun, 27, one of the many political novices to win a seat in the elections last November, is the fourth councillor cautioned by the government since taking office in January.Riding on the momentum of months of the anti-government protests that erupted in Hong Kong last summer, the pro…


Coronavirus: Trudeau announces $40M for women’s shelters, $10M for Indigenous women and kids

Canada would also be boosting its Reaching Home homelessness strategy by over $157 million to help communities buy things like physical barriers or renting new spaces to keep people safe amid the coronavirus outbreak.


Coronavirus: Trudeau announces $40M for women’s shelters, $10M for Indigenous women and kids

Canada would also be boosting its Reaching Home homelessness strategy by over $157 million to help communities buy things like physical barriers or renting new spaces to keep people safe amid the coronavirus outbreak.


Governor Noem?s Statement on the Passing of Representative Bob Glanzer

PIERRE, S.D. ? Governor Kristi Noem issued the following statement on the passing of state Representative Bob Glanzer (R-Huron):


Number of New Brunswick COVID-19 cases approaches triple digits

Officials say that it's important to continue following physical distancing protocols even if there is a low number of confirmed cases on one day. 


Saskatchewan entertainer brings live game show to Facebook amid COVID-19

Weyburn's Richy Roy is offering some online entertainment during COVID-19 with his newly launched Big Time Live — an interactive game show on Facebook.


Coronavirus: York Region closes forests, 120 km of trails due to COVID-19

The tracts cover 2,300 hectares of land throughout the region.


Coronavirus: Cases rise to 6,101 as fatalities spike to 61 in Quebec

The Quebec government is expected to provide an update on Saturday on its response to the novel coronavirus outbreak as cases continue to rise.


Coronavirus: Stanfield’s looks to fill 50 jobs ‘immediately’ to make medical gowns

The jobs would be part-time and full-time in the sewing department at the historic Canadian undergarment factory in Truro, N.S.


What we know now: Updates to your coronavirus questions, a month after COVID-19 was confirmed in Colorado

A lot has happened since the start of March, to say the least.

When The Denver Post last published answers to your questions about the new coronavirus, on March 6, Colorado had eight confirmed cases of COVID-19 and no deaths attributed to it. As of April 3, the state had 4,173 confirmed cases, and 111 people had died of complications from the virus.

The science has evolved since then, too, including our understanding of how the virus is transmitted. That doesn’t mean the public health guidelines given in February and March — or our attempts to report them — were based on stupidity or malice.

When a new virus emerges, scientists have to start learning about it from scratch, and sometimes their early conclusions turn out to be wrong as new information becomes available.

With that in mind, here’s an update to your earlier questions, with what we know now and what’s still a mystery.

Someone I know has COVID-19. Am I at risk?

The initial guidance was that you’re at risk if you’ve spent 10 minutes or more within six feet of an infected person. Now that’s a little less clear, since there are some indications the virus can travel further than we initially believed. The same basic principle holds, though: the closer you were, and the longer you spent in close proximity, the higher your risk. Since people can transmit the virus before developing symptoms, you should act as if you have it to protect others if someone you’ve spent time with has it.

What should I do if I could have the virus?

As of early March, the guidance was to call your doctor to see if you should be tested. Since then, testing has been largely limited to people with symptoms severe enough that they need to be hospitalized, health care workers and first responders. If you have symptoms that you can manage, there’s not much for you to do except isolate yourself and use home remedies like drinking plenty of water and taking acetaminophen for pain and fever. Other people in your household who could have been exposed also should limit their contact with the outside world as much as possible.

If you have a chronic condition that puts you at a higher risk of complications, you might want to check in with your doctor to set up a monitoring plan, so you’re clear about when to seek medical care. Most people shouldn’t go out for care unless they have symptoms that require emergency care, like difficulty breathing.

How worried should I be?

The data still suggests about 80% of cases can be managed at home. Older people and those with chronic conditions are most at risk for severe complications, but it’s no cake walk for even those who are young and healthy. In other states, people in their 30s who had no known risk factors have died from COVID-19. So while you don’t want to lie awake, consumed with fear, everybody needs to take precautions to protect themselves and others.

What are the odds of the virus being on surfaces in public places?

The virus is detectable on hard surfaces for up to three days. What’s less clear is how long it remains in concentrations that can infect someone (one virus particle isn’t enough to do it). Since there’s no way of knowing how long it’s been since an infected person might have touched any particular surface, however, the best way to protect yourself is to avoid touching your face and wash your hands as soon as you can after being out in public.

Should I wear a mask?

The guidance on this is still evolving. Public health agencies initially told people without symptoms that a mask wouldn’t protect them much, but it’s now clear that there was concern about conserving supplies for health care workers, who are most at risk from the virus. Now, Gov. Jared Polis has asked all Coloradans to wear cloth non-medical masks when going out in public. The argument for it is that infected people without symptoms would be less likely to transmit the virus. The argument against had been that people fussing with a mask may touch their faces more than they normally would, or have a false sense of security and ignore orders to stay home.

Isn’t this like the seasonal flu?

No. While fewer Americans have died so far from COVID-19 than die in a typical flu season, that’s because the virus has only been spreading here for a few months. With the seasonal flu, we have vaccines and some degree of existing immunity to help soften the blow, and neither of those exists for the new virus. The death rate for COVID-19 isn’t totally clear, because we don’t have enough tests to get a good count of how many people are managing their symptoms at home, or may not have shown any symptoms. Early data suggests it’s higher than the death rate for seasonal flu for all age groups, though.

Ultimately, though, the real evidence of the difference isn’t in the statistics. It’s in New York, where bodies are being stored in refrigerated trucks because morgues have filled up; in Ecuador, where coffins are being left on sidewalks because the authorities can’t keep up; and in Spain, where overwhelmed caregivers abandoned nursing home residents with their dead housemates. While shutting down large parts of the economy has produced severe pain for many people, it’s disingenuous to claim that life would go on as normal if we eased up.



Coronavirus: about 130 riot police in Hong Kong’s West Kowloon region ordered into quarantine

Hong Kong’s entire police force may have to be tested for Covid-19, and nearly all members of a regional anti-riot squad will be placed under quarantine for two weeks, after an officer involved in mass arrests at the site of an anti-government protest earlier this week was confirmed to be infected on Saturday.About 130 of the elite team tackling disorder in the West Kowloon region will be out of action and their jobs covered by officers from other districts.Hong Kong probes first case of…


Liverpool Women: Vicky Jepson on recruitment, isolation & Zoom

Liverpool Women manager Vicky Jepson has been using time away from football due to the coronavirus to look at recruitment for next season.


Historic Battleford, Sask. church might not survive another decade

St. Vital Parish has stood through multiple wars, pandemics, and many other moments in history.


Quebec man, 52, stabbed to death after break and enter in Hudson

A 52-year-old man was stabbed to death following a break and enter into a residence in Hudson, near Rigaud in the Montérégie region.


Derby Barracks / Operating Without Owners Consent – VCOR

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE   CASE#: 20A501188 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Aaron Leonard STATION: Derby CONTACT#: 802-334-8881   DATE/TIME: 04/01/2020 0927 INCIDENT LOCATION: VT Route 105, Charleston VIOLATION: Operating Without Consent of Owner   ACCUSED: Sarah Romanowski AGE: 39 CITY, STATE


Ontario reports 375 new coronavirus cases, including 27 deaths

Saturday's announcement marks an 11.5 per cent increase, compared to a 16.5 per cent increase reported on Friday.


‘Heard it coming like a train’: Small town near Palm Springs sees 11 earthquakes

The small town of Anza near Palm Springs, California, shook for hours Friday evening into Saturday morning, after it was hit by a 4.9 earthquake followed by 10 aftershocks over … Click to Continue »


California nursing students will graduate after state relaxes rules during pandemic

The California Department of Consumer Affairs announced Friday evening that it was temporarily lowering the direct patient care training requirements for nursing students in obstetrics, pediatrics, and mental health/psychiatric fields. … Click to Continue »


Derby Barracks / 1st Degree Aggravated Domestic Assault – VCOR

STATE OF VERMONT   DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY   VERMONT STATE POLICE     NEWS RELEASE     CASE#: 20A501211   RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Aaron Leonard   STATION: Derby   CONTACT#: 802-334-8881     DATE/TIME: 04/03/2020 1446 hours   INCIDENT LOCATION: Derby Pond Road, Derby   VIOLATION: 1st Degree Aggravated Domestic Assault / Violation of Conditions of Release  


Huntsville International Airport making changes to cope with COVID-19 pandemic

Data pix.

Across the nation, airports are nearly empty and the industry could lose more than $110 billion by the time the COVID-19 pandemic is through.

Huntsville International Airport is taking precautions to sanitize for travelers and prevent the spread of COVID-19, but they recommend people limit travel to essential needs only. Huntsville International TSA says they are screening about 100 people a day - that's under 10 percent of how many they normally check in.

"If you look around behind me, there is nobody here," explained spokesperson Jana Kuner. "It is a ghost town. The hotels are empty, the rental companies are not renting cars. It's just not business as usual. We are operating on mission-critical mode and that means we are operating on a budget that is the very minimum we can operate."

The airport says they are doing what they can to preserve jobs and have split employees into two shifts in order to allow social distance and keep people working.


COMMENTARY: The COVID-19 mystery is here for the long haul. We need facts, patience and stamina

It’s not possible to know how this pandemic will end, Dawna Friesen says. That's a hard thing to accept in a world that's used to instant gratification.


Liverpool place some non-playing staff on furlough

Liverpool place some of their staff on furlough, in response to the ongoing suspension of Premier League because of the coronavirus crisis.


Channel migrants: Border Force intercepts four boats

Border Force officials deal with a series of incidents in the English Channel.


Watford General Hospital tells people not to go to its A&E unit

Watford General Hospital blamed a shortage of oxygen for closing its A&E unit to new patients.


Cyclist critically injured after being struck by vehicle, assaulted in Etobicoke: police

Police said they were called to the area of Harefield Drive and Hinton Road shortly after 7:15 a.m. for reports of a collision. 


Coronavirus: Villagers sing for neighbour’s 100th birthday

George Hamilton got a chorus of singing from his village in north Devon, all from a safe distance.


Coronavirus live updates: Cloth masks recommended; FEMA sends medical supplies

The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus marched to another record-setting pace early Saturday, with nearly 1,200 deaths in 24 hours as federal emergency workers tried to answer desperate pleas for respirators from dozens of states. Many traditions of American life are changing daily, with the nation's most iconic retailers – including Walmart, Target, Costco and Home Depot – invoking new rules about how many people can be allowed inside stores. [...]


Pet fostering takes off as coronavirus keeps Americans home

The Simeon family was heading home to Omaha from a Smoky Mountains vacation when Kim Simeon spotted a social media post from the Nebraska Humane Society, pleading with people to … Click to Continue »


WZYP giving away hand sanitizer Saturday afternoon

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WZYP was out in Athens yesterday giving away free hand sanitizer.

"All the concerts and ticket money have kinda gone out the window right now and this is what people want, they want hand sanitizer, they want toilet paper so we got our hands on some sanitizer, explained afternoon host Steve Smith. "It took some time to get here - the box finally arrived yesterday so today we're giving it away and we're doing it on Saturday as well."

Yes, you heard right! They are giving more today.

To get some free hand sanitizer from 104.3 WZYP, go to the front of their building at 1717 Highway 72 East from noon-1 p.m.

Just drive through, roll down your window, and they'll toss it right in!


Coronavirus: Online birthday held for three-year-old

Minnie celebrated the big day by partying with family and friends via video call.


To mask or not to mask: WHO makes U-turn while US, Singapore abandon pandemic advice and tell citizens to start wearing masks

As the world grapples with the Covid-19 pandemic which has made more than a million people sick and caused more than 58,000 deaths so far, one issue has divided the international medical community: should everyone wear masks to slow the spread of the coronavirus?From the start, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said the answer was, no. Masks should be worn by those who are sick, and medical and care workers, according to the global body. There was no need for people who are well to wear them…


TO YOUR HEALTH: University of Virginia drug trials

Investigational COVID drug test for inpatients with significant symptoms


Wayne Farms Albertville sells over 2,000 pounds of chicken Friday

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ALBERTVILLE, Ala. - Folks across the Tennessee Valley got the chance to buy some heavily discounted chicken from Wayne Farms Albertville - all from the comfort of their own vehicles.

The local business offered a drive-through chicken sale Friday and folks from all over came to buy some. Organizers tell us they were selling around 2,500 pounds of chicken at less than a dollar per pound. Wayne Farms Albertville leaders say they wanted to help provide for the community in a healthy way during the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

"It's a tough time out there right now and we really wanted to do something to take the pressure off of wallets for folks," explained Human Resources Manager Melissa Deason. "A lot of people are without income or steady employment so we thought this was a good way to help the community."

Because of an overwhelming social media response, they had to limit each vehicle to two boxes, each with 40-pounds worth inside.


Huntsville aerospace company working to build ventilators

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - Ventilators are in high demand right now, and a Huntsville-based company teamed up with the University of Alabama in Huntsville to help turn a piece of space technology into ventilators.

GATR Technologies makes inflatable satellite antennas for the Department of Defense. For the past 14 days, engineers have been repurposing the inflation component of those antennas to function as a ventilator. Vice President Roark McDonald says they turned to UAH as experts to turn aerospace technology into something that could save lives.

"Because we're an aerospace defense company, we didn't have a lot of expertise in the medical field. So we reached out to the UAH College of Nursing - they have a learning and technology research center. They've been very helpful to allow us to bring our ventilator into their center and test it."

The team is very close to finishing tests in order to deliver their product to local health care professionals and hope to do that in the coming days.

They have a goal to produce 50 to 100 ventilators per week at their factory in Huntsville.


Coronavirus updates and cancellations in our state

General questions 1-866-408-1899, or 711 hearing-impaired, 8:30-6 p.m. M-F, 10-4 p.m. weekends or email DPHCall@delaware.gov. Official page: de.gov/coronavirus.


Children in lockdown to learn about Leeds United

Youngsters who cannot go to school can learn about the club's history as part of their studies.


Coronavirus: Phone company ‘greedy’ over hospital phone charges

Southport and Ormskirk NHS Trust was told it would cost them £10,000 to divert the costs.


Greedy landlords must be forced to cut rent in coronavirus crisis

“You guys are fat. We have fed you for years. I hope you don’t only talk about the spirit of the contracts. I hope you can talk about the conscience of corporate social responsibility.”The quote of the week comes from Tommy Cheung Yu-yan, the lawmaker representing the catering sector, in calling out Hong Kong’s money-grubbing landlords for not chipping in to ease the burden on commercial tenants whose businesses have been devastated by the coronavirus crisis.I’m not sure if Cheung was…


Coronavirus: Saudi Arabia criticizes Russia over collapse of oil prices

Saudi Arabia sharply criticized Russia on Saturday over what it described as Moscow blaming the kingdom for the collapse in global energy prices, showing the tensions ahead of an emergency meeting of OPEC and other oil producers.


How Ontario realtors are coping during the coronavirus pandemic

Real estate is a face-to-face profession. How are realtors coping in the age of coronavirus and social distancing?


Custom auto shops across the US are banding together to make 20,000 face shields for health care workers

(CNN) — As health care workers across the US put their lives at risk to battle the coronavirus, an unlikely industry has stepped up to help them get the protective gear they need — custom auto shops.

JK Automotive Designs in Stoneham, Massachusetts, is normally busy bringing people’s car fantasies to life. Now, the auto upholstery shop and dozens of others like it are using their tools to create thousands of face shields.

Nurses, doctors and other health care workers face an extreme shortage of personal protective equipment, and they are being told to ration face masks or even reuse them.

JK owner Jeremy Katz and coworker Evan Collins first tried using a 3D printer and a design they found on the internet. But printing just two face shields took five hours.

“There’s no way we could have waited that long, so Evan went downstairs and made a new design,” Katz told CNN.

Using it and the shop’s laser machine, they made 45 shields every 10 minutes, and 19 straps every 20 minutes.

Helping nurses and others ‘afraid to go to work’

With the help of Faith Michaels, who runs non-profit organization Kids Clothes Club, Katz and Collins have donated hundreds of masks to health care workers in Massachusetts, New York, Florida and Puerto Rico.

“We’ve seen grown men cry,” Katz said. “They’re appreciative because there’s none around. I’ve had emails and Facebook requests from nurses across the country begging for one of them because they’re afraid to go to work.”

Katz made the design public for other custom auto shops, and it caught on quickly.

Shops in California, Nebraska, and Alaska are making the face shields and delivering hundreds to local hospitals. Katz estimates that more than 20,000 masks have been manufactured and donated.

Daniel Williams, owner of DJ Designs in Hayward, California, started a week ago.

“(The health care workers are) the ones keeping us healthy and going. They’re the ones sacrificing their health,” Williams said. “We’re just sacrificing some time, so it was a very easy decision.”

‘It just feels right’

In Plattsmouth, Nebraska, Tracy Weaver, owner of Recovery Room Hot Rod Interiors, has made more than 500 and said the production costs are coming out of his own pocket.

“I contacted the Methodist Hospital here in Omaha and they wanted to take every one that we made,” Weaver said. “We’re just thankful that we have the skills and the creativity to do this, and we’re going to have something to look back on and be proud to say that I had a small part in that.”

To help lift some of that financial burden, Katz has started a GoFundMe campaign that has raised more than $40,000. That’s enough money to make another 30,000 face shields, and Katz said he’s also ramping up production of intubation boxes, which act as a barrier between the doctor and patient.

Katz said he and his nationwide network of friends will continue to make face shields until the hospitals don’t need them anymore.

“It just feels right,” Katz said. “We have the skillset to do it and the tooling. So why not try to make a little bit of difference until all the big guys come along and flood the hospitals with the shields they need right now.”


Manitoba mom sews handmade face masks amid coronavirus pandemic

Liz Kischook's group, Manitoba Made, has sewn roughly 50 face masks so far for people to wear amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.


Denver isn’t doing enough to protect homeless population from coronavirus, advocates say

Three weeks past its own deadline, Denver still has no substantial, documented strategy in place to mitigate the spread of coronavirus among people experiencing homelessness.

Individuals are packing homeless shelters and continuing to gather in public, despite pleas from health officials for people to maintain safe distances from each other during the pandemic.

Denver has lined up about 150 individual rooms for an estimated 4,000 people without permanent housing. Next door, Aurora, which has a homeless population one-tenth the size, has secured at least 120 rooms.

Meanwhile, the number of people exhibiting symptoms and testing positive within Denver’s homeless population is rising. Six had tested positive for the virus as of Friday, according to Heather Burke, a city spokesperson — up from two last week. The numbers are likely low because of the widespread shortage of tests.

Denver’s lack of strategy puts an already vulnerable population at more risk as the pandemic worsens, experts say. Protective steps underway are either going in the wrong direction or moving far too slow, they say.

“If we act in the next few days, we might be able to protect this community, but it’s got to happen,” said Cathy Alderman, a spokesperson for the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s office did not respond to requests for comment.

At some of the Denver Rescue Mission’s shelters, beds are approximately 4 feet apart, spokesperson Alexxa Gagner said — far short of the 6-foot minimum “social distancing” that health officials are recommending.

Of the 150 additional individual rooms — called respite rooms — secured by Denver officials for those needing isolation to quarantine while awaiting test results or to rest while exhibiting symptoms, 91 are currently occupied, Burke said.

Kevin Richins, a resident at the ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Kevin Richins, a resident at the Salvation Army Crossroads Shelter in Denver, washes his hands inside the facility on March 16, 2020.The city has installed hand-washing stations at the facility, which are mandatory for guests who eat dinner at the shelter to use, and the staff have stepped up their efforts to stave off coronavirus by cleaning more thoroughly throughout the day and during dinner in Salvation Army facilities.

Additional group shelter space is available for symptomatic people experiencing homelessness, and so far 15 of those 48 available beds are taken, said Derek Woodbury spokesperson for Denver’s Department of Housing Stability.

Department officials have said they’re working to find hundreds more rooms, but Chief Housing Officer Britta Fisher has estimated Denver could need thousands. The city is now preparing to open a larger temporary shelter to relieve the pressure on the system.

Housing the homeless is a challenge in the best of times, said Dr. Sandy Johnson, director of the University of Denver’s school of global health affairs.

“Now we have this crisis where we’re forgetting about the most vulnerable people in our population,” she said.

While Denver is behind the curve, so is the rest of the country, said Tristia Bauman, a senior attorney with the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty.

Denver’s strategy

The first case of coronavirus in the United States hit a man in his 30s in the Seattle area around Jan. 21 after he returned from a trip to Wuhan, China, where the outbreak began.

But Denver officials didn’t adopt an action plan for COVID-19, the highly contagious respiratory illness caused by the virus, until March 5. That was the same day the state announced the first two cases of COVID-19 in Colorado. That plan called for the development by March 13 of a strategy to manage cases of the virus among the homeless population.

Asked for that strategy this week, city officials said there is no document.

Rather, officials establish an objective and the tasks needed to accomplish it, which are then delegated to Denver’s Emergency Operations Center, said city spokesperson Ryan Luby. The ongoing strategy for the homeless is to expand existing shelter and supplemental shelter space and to add more individual “respite rooms.”

City officials have taken steps meant to help the homeless, said Terese Howard, a spokesperson for Denver Homeless Out Loud, but she questioned whether that amounts to an actual strategy.

“The whole nation and world has been told to stay at home, separate yourself from others,” Howard said. “When it comes to homelessness, all those rules seem to change. They say ‘Oh, you can just keep your mats at the shelter three feet apart. Just wash the doorknobs every hour.’”

Denver does appear to have a strategy for assisted living and congregate care facilities, under which homeless shelters might fall. Again, however, there’s not a specific document, and the strategy offered by city officials is only eight vague sentences long.

Jon looks at a map of ...
AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post

Jon looks at a map of hand washing stations that came with his bag of sanitation supplies on Thursday, March 12, 2020.

It describes Denver’s partnerships with public health organizations to corral the needed experts, aligning with those organizations “to implement certain restrictions and control measures to keep residents and staff safe.”

Examples include limiting group activities, regularly disinfecting commonly touched surfaces and recommending that health care providers wear personal protective gear so that they don’t contract the virus. The brief outline also describes calling those facilities regularly for case updates and symptom overviews.

“Maybe it’s an information strategy, but it is not a strategy for how to address the crisis of a virus spreading among the population of people experiencing homelessness,” Alderman said.

More shelter space planned

In the meantime, city officials appear poised to consolidate shelter space at a larger facility that has yet to be named, though the Colorado Convention Center and the National Western complex are among the facilities under consideration.

“It’s still not going to be enough,” Howard said. “You’re still going to have close to 2,000 people in one facility. That’s not quite the standards we’re trying to meet in this nation.”

Officials from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment did not respond when asked whether the department — which is leading the statewide effort against the coronavirus — agrees with Denver’s consolidated shelter strategy.

Instead of creating more shelter space, homeless advocates said, the city should be securing more individual spaces. Late last year the Apartment Association of Metro Denver estimated a 4.7% vacancy rate among the area’s more than 350,000 units, totaling more than 16,000 vacant units.

Denver Homeless Out Loud and partner organizations in Fort Collins and Boulder filed a request in Denver County District Court on Wednesday to order Gov. Jared Polis to use available properties for emergency housing, Howard said. A spokesperson for Polis did not say whether the governor is considering such an order.

Another approach, Johnson said, would be for the city to allow outdoor homeless encampments as the weather warms, and to provide showers and restrooms. If scores of portable restrooms can be made available for outdoor concerts and events, she said, surely the city could do the same in this case.

No major American city has a well-rounded strategy for protecting people without housing during the pandemic, Bauman said, but some have promising aspects of a strategy. Los Angeles, for example, enacted a moratorium on vehicle ticketing, towing and impounding, offering relief for the many who live out of their cars.

Denver lifted many of its parking restrictions, which Bauman applauded. But still, she said, much more work is needed.



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Huntsville Hospital Heart Center transitions patient to telehealth program

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — In the past two weeks, the Huntsville Hospital Heart Center has held 381 virtual appointments.

Non-urgent cardiology patients are still keeping their regular appointments, but instead of coming to the hospital, they’re meeting with their physician via a telehealth program.

This telehealth program is a temporary measure to reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure, but Dr. Jacqueline Green feels some patients will prefer the program moving forward.

“Prior to the pandemic, we’d just go from room to room seeing patients,” she said. “Talking to them about their problems, prescribing and adjusting medications.”

Dr. Green’s team reviews upcoming appointments and decides if it’s safe for the patient to check in with her virtually, instead.

“There’s something to be said for just laying eyes on people,” she said. “Do they look well or do they not look well? Do they look like they’re in distress, do they look like they’re having difficulty breathing?”

Dr. Green says– in a way– she’s learning more about her patients.

“I didn’t think about how you can learn about a person just by seeing their home,” she said.

This program was designed to be temporary, but Dr. Green hopes to be able to offer this service even after the COVID-19 outbreak is over.

“Down the road when the pandemic’s over, there’s going to be a portion of patients who are really going to want to do this for their check-ins,” she said.

If a patient has a virtual appointment, and afterward it’s clear a patient needs a physical exam, they can still go to the hospital to see a physician.


Roadwork on U.S. 36 this week between Federal and Pecos

Extensive road work is scheduled to begin Sunday on a two-mile stretch of U.S. 36 from Federal Boulevard to Pecos Street.

The work will require double lane closures in each direction with one lane remaining open each way, according to the state Department of Transportation. Drivers should expect delays.

The work, which will be around the clock, begins Sunday afternoon and will run through Friday. Drivers are urged to take alternate routes if possible.


Community members organize “Park and Pray” event for employees of Helen Keller Hospital

SHEFFIELD, Ala. — Park and Pray events have taken place at hospitals across north Alabama including Helen Keller Hospital in Sheffield.

Several dozen people drove out to the Wellcare Center at Helen Keller hospital to show their support for hospital workers who have been giving it their all during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Friday’s event was planned by members of the community who wanted to show their support. Vehicles lined the parking lot with lights flashing and horns honking. First responders from Sheffield and Tuscumbia were in attendance as well flashing their lights and sounding their sirens. To keep everyone safe and in their cars, Christian radio station 91.3 The Fix broadcasted the event. Area mayors and spiritual leaders led prayer through that broadcast.

Hospital employees stepped outside and lined the sidewalk holding posters with messages of love and thanks directed toward the prayer warriors in attendance.

The hospital’s president, Kyle Buchanan, spoke on how thankful he is for this community. “We’re overwhelmed by the amount of support provided by our community during this very critical time,” said Buchanan. “We have received prayers, water, masks from members of our community that just poured in; we didn’t solicit any of that, folks just stepped up to help.”

For anyone who would like to continue supporting the employees at Helen Keller, they are still accepting donations of water, face masks, and more. To arrange a donation, you’re asked to contact Lindsey Hudson with Working Fit at (256) 386-4765 or email working.fit@helenkeller.com. For questions about tax deductibility, contact Pam Fleming at (256) 386-4765 or email pam.fleming@helenkeller.com.

Data pix.

School districts limiting food distribution after Spring Break, could change with stay at home order

HUNTSVILLE, Ala – School districts across the country distributed food over Spring Break despite the COVID-19 pandemic. As break ends, most districts are opting to still provide food, but on a more limited basis.

Data pix.

However, the recent stay at home order could change that for certain school districts. Schools all over the country are still feeding children despite similar orders. Be sure check with your school district.

In Harvest, the Madison County School District fed upwards of 300 students in a single day during break.

"We have some students in this area, they depend on us," said Annette Ikard, the CPM Manager at Harvest Elementary.

Students in Alabama will not return to physical school this year. Instead, they will learn online or from packets. As you can imagine, the students, staff and parents have enjoyed getting fresh air during these drive-thru food pickups.

"They love coming up. They always asks what's for lunch? They want to know what we've got in there. They will wave at us and give us big smiles," said Ikard.

Starting Monday, Madison County Schools will shift from feeding 5-days a week to 2-days a week. They will have several drive-thru locations open Monday and Wednesday. Students will get 2 breakfast packs and 2 lunch packs to cover the missed days. Click here for details.

"We know that 18,000 meals were served over the last three weeks. That puts it in perspective. The kids needed a meal," said Tim Hall with Madison County Schools.

Huntsville City Schools will have drive-thru locations open Monday, Wednesday and Friday. They will be open 10:30am-12:30pm. Please check your emails or the school website for pickup locations.

Madison City Schools will be delivering food by bus on Tuesday's and Thursday's from 11:00am-1:00pm and will also do pickup locations. Click here for more information.

You are highly encouraged to check your local school districts social media and website for specific information as it pertains to feeding children for the rest of the school year. Districts are not mandated to do so, but many still are.

Because of the stay at home order, it is possible some school districts will not offer this service. Many are taking this day-by-day and judging the rate of infection as they continue to feed the kids who need it most.

If you need help locating information, call your district. If you have questions, we can try to help.


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Employees at IHP in Russellville voice safety concerns after an employee tests positive for COVID-19

Data pix.

RUSSELLVILLE, Ala. — Innovative Hearth Products in Russellville has a nearly full parking lot as employees returned to work following a five-day closure. Chief Operating Officer Jason Pickering confirmed with WHNT News 19 that one employee tested positive for COVID-19.

The company said it closed the plant for five days to sanitize and clean the facility before beginning the reopening process on March 30. Assembly line workers returned to work April 1.

Employees reached out to WHNT News 19 and told us in order to return to work they were required to sign an agreement listing new expectations to help prevent the spread of the virus.

That list includes limiting mass entries and exits in and out of the facility, maintaining a six foot social distance, and taking 15 minutes to clean and sanitize each work station before and at the end of each shift.

“What we asked everybody is that they recognize that we’re going to follow the CDC guidelines. We want them to be able to make sure that they understand what that means from a personal hygiene standpoint,” said Pickering.

An employee said although a six-foot social distance is required, it’s not being done in some areas. “Everybody that works, we all crowd in a group,” they said. “They keep on saying six feet apart but nobody stays six feet apart. It’s putting families in jeopardy, people at home that have health problems. They could bring that back from work and give that to them.” Pickering said he understands the frustration and processes have begun to help maintain that social distance.

Unemployment pay was another concern employees raised. They wanted to know how they could be compensated for the days the plant was shut down. Pickering recommended reading through the Employee Paid Leave Rights in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

Pickering said during this difficult time, communication is key. “We absolutely will work with people and find a solution that works for them and works for the company and we’re able to get through this together; we’re all in in it together,” he said. “We’re not trying to be separate and we don’t need to act like we’re separate; we can figure it out.”

IHP released a statement regarding COVID-19 that aims to answer some questions employees might have concerning the virus. For any other questions, Pickering said employees may contact a supervisor or manager.


Family missing from Thornton is found crossing the U.S. border into Mexico

Parents and a toddler missing from Thornton have been found crossing the U.S. border into Mexico.

Reported missing on Wednesday, the family is “safe and unharmed,” said Matt Barnes, a police spokesman.

 

Thornton police were notified Friday that Zaiqiao Feng, 48, Liu Nei Li, 40, and their 2-year-old daughter, Anny, were encountered crossing the border south of San Diego, Barnes said.

They have been detained pending questions about their sudden and mysterious departure, which included leaving a 5-year-old child behind in their Thornton home. They failed to tell extended family in the Thornton area that they were leaving and why they left suddenly, police said.

On Wednesday night, police serving a search warrant at the home found an illegal marijuana grow. Thornton investigators are seeking answers to the questions around their disappearance and are working to have the family returned here, Barnes said.

The 5-year-old who was left behind is safe and with extended family members.


Coronavirus in the US: Here’s what happened Friday

Tracking the virus:

Friday was the deadliest day in the U.S. since the start of the pandemic, with more than 1,000 dying from coronavirus. The death toll in the U.S. has surpassed 7,000.

As the time of this writing, Johns Hopkins University data show 58,871 deaths worldwide, along with 1,098,848 confirmed cases. The U.S. leads all countries with 277,828 confirmed cases.

White House briefing:

CDC issues new mask recommendations: The CDC is now recommending all people wear “cloth face covers” in public. During Friday’s White House briefing, President Trump announced the new guidelines but said he won’t follow them. Here are some tips on making a cloth face mask, with or without sewing.

Administration to pay uninsured COVID-19 patients’ medical bills: Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said Friday that funds from the $2 trillion stimulus package will be used to reimburse hospitals for testing and treating uninsured coronavirus patients. Providers will be paid at Medicare rates from a $100 billion fund.

In other news:

Walmart to limit customers: Walmart announced Friday that only five customers per 1,000 square feet will be allowed in stores at once. Aisles will be marked as “one way” to help limit contact between customers.

Google to release your location data: Google is publicly releasing location data it’s already collecting to help governments and health officials better plan their response to the pandemic. Google says the company will not release information that could be used to identify any individuals, but hopes to show larger movement trends.


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04-03-20 Hilo stabbing incident

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Criminal Investigation Section, Area I
Lieutenant Rio Amon-Wilkins
Phone: (808) 961-2252
Report No. 20-026089

 

Media Release

Hawaiʻi Island Police detectives are continuing their investigation into a reported stabbing incident that was reported early Friday morning (April 3) in downtown Hilo.

At approximately 12:52 a.m., South Hilo Patrol officers were assigned to the area of Punahoa Street and Furneaux Lane for a report of a male that had been stabbed. The 54-year-old victim was bleeding heavily and appeared to have injuries consistent with stab wounds. He was transported via ambulance to the Hilo Medical Center Emergency Room where he later underwent surgery. The victim remains hospitalized in stable condition.

During the course of this investigation, police determined this incident occurred in the gravel parking lot south of the Hilo Farmer’s Market produce vendor area. 

Police are asking anyone who may have witnessed this incident to contact Detective Todd Pataray at (808) 961-2382 or email at todd.pataray@hawaiicounty.gov or call the police department’s non-emergency number at (808) 935-3311.

 

 


Personal delivery services like Kim’s Quik-Cart helping families during a time of need

Data pix.

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - Grocery delivery is more essential than ever before, but big box stores could be bogged down with orders. Our most vulnerable shoppers -- like the elderly and those with compromised immune systems -- are counting on these services.

WHNT News 19 followed a personal shopper who's braving the stores and delivering the goods.

I can't risk getting sick. I need help.

"I'm Kim and this is the Quik-Cart." Kim Osbourne is a professional grocery shopper.

"I can do up to six families a day," said Kim. She's taking the load off families who can't compromise their health, and Kelli Hames is one of her Quik-Cart customers.

"Yes, it was mostly influenced by the pandemic," said Kelli. "One -- because you want to limit who was coming in contact with them and we definitely didn't want my dad trying to shop."

Kim said these unprecedented times skyrocketed her business by 70%, but that doesn't make the shopping experience any easier.

Business is booming, but shopping time can stretch.

"I'm having to go to stores -- multiple stores -- with one order just to find what I need," said Kim. A 30-minute trip for one family now takes at least an hour. "Looking for Lysol spray -- that's almost impossible."

Kim said hiring a personal shopper for all your grocery needs can limit exposure to germs by cutting down the number of people inside the store. She said, "the less people in the stores, the better."

The groceries get bagged up and left on the doorstep of her customers.

"She can deliver their groceries and doesn't have to have any contact with them directly," said Kelli.

The Quik-Cart delivers same day.

Kim has been a personal shopper for Madison County Residents for at least two years.

"There’s such a backlog now [with national delivery services] during this pandemic, where most of the people who need to place an order can’t place an order and get it the same day," said Kim. "They’re having to wait three days in a lot of cases and up to a week. That’s where my service comes in."

Contact Kim's Quik-Cart.

On this trip -- Kim Osbourne couldn't find everything. So she's on the move again, so you can stay put.

You may call or text Kim's Quik-Cart for your grocery needs Monday - Friday 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. Dial 256-295-8868 or download her app shop.dumpling.us/kimo on all android and iPhone devices.


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Arrests Made in Multiple Robbery Offenses

Friday, April 3, 2020

 

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Criminal Investigations Division announced several arrests in recent robbery cases in Washington, DC.

 

Second District:

 

  • On Monday, March 30, 2020, 20 year-old Rody Amphas, of Southeast, DC, was arrested for a Robbery (Snatch) offense that occurred on Monday, March 30, 2020, in the 2400 block of Calvert Street, Northwest. CCN: 20-052-869
    • At approximately 4:43 pm, the suspect approached the victim at the listed location. The suspect then snatched the victim’s property and fled the scene.

 

Third District:

 

  • On Monday, March 30, 2020, a 15 year-old juvenile male, of Northeast, DC, was arrested for a Robbery (Force and Violence) offense that occurred on Monday, March 30, 2020, in the 100 block of Thomas Street, Northwest. CCN: 20-052-857
    • At approximately 4:57 pm, the suspects approached the victim at the listed location. The suspects assaulted the victim and took the victim’s property. The suspects then fled the scene. This case remains under investigation.

 

Sixth District:

 

  • On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 49 year-old Tyrone Williams, of Capitol Heights, MD, was arrested for an Assault with Intent to Rob offense that occurred on Sunday, March 29, 2020, in the 900 block of Eastern Avenue, Northeast. CCN: 20-052-304
    • At approximately 11:45 am, two suspects approached the victim at the listed location. The suspects assaulted the victim then fled the scene. This case remains under investigation.

 

 

As a reminder, citizens are encouraged to use the Safe Exchange Zones when conducting in-person transactions using online applications such as Craigslist and Offer Up. For more information, please visit: http://mpdc.dc.gov/release/mpd-exchange-zone-locations-reminder


Hong Kong district council election data reveals turnout now highest among young people, driven to the ballot box by anti-government protests

The turnout of young people in Hong Kong’s district council elections doubled last year to 73.1 per cent, as new voting analysis reveals how pan-democrats secured their landslide victory.

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Local Girl Scout troop sends message of thanks to medical workers

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HARVEST, Ala. -- Girl Scout Troop # 21104 in Harvest decided even if they're stuck at home, they still had a job to do.

"The Girl Scouts are about 'discover, connect, and take action,'" said troop leader Melissa Henderson.

The troop decided to take action to thank the men and women in north Alabama who are risking their own health to take care of the community. Henderson was watching the news and --- when she had an idea.

"We felt the need to take action here," Henderson said. "There's doctors and nurses on the front line that really need our support and help."

Henderson rallied up her Daisy Troop and they got crafty with cards, posters, and videos to show their appreciation.

"They don't even have to do it, but they chose to, because they want to help us," Brooke Henderson said.

"We hope you be safe and healthy, and make sure you're believing in yourself! Yay!" Bailey Henderson said.

These girls want medical workers to know they've got your back and it's a scout's honor to do so!


Sixth staff member at Saskatoon Correctional Centre tests positive for COVID-19

A group is calling for the Saskatchewan government to implement measures to mitigate the risk of further transmission of COVID-19 in provincial correctional facilities.


Rent is still due. There are no changes in state law right now, except federal housing laws.

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - Legal experts said the CARES Act - the federal stimulus bill President Trump recently signed into law - is bringing some of the biggest changes in the housing industry in our lifetime.

Some landlords don't know if they can send late notices to renters, and some tenants don't know if they have to pay.

"Tenants need to know their rent is still due just like normal," said Legal Services Alabama in Huntsville Managing Attorney Holly Ray.

There are no changes in state law regarding rent payments.

"There's a common misconception that most landlords don't have to pay their mortgages or loans. That's just simply not true," said Sarah Taggart. She runs the Law Firm of Sarah Taggart in Huntsville. She represents residential and commercial landlords.

Attorneys Holly Ray and Sarah Taggart say the Alabama court system is closed until April 30, but evictions can still be filed.

"All of the restrictions that were placed on landlords before the virus remain in place," said Taggart.

Ray has received a rise in calls about landlords shutting off power and water, and changing door locks without court approval. That's illegal.

"A tenant can sue the landlord for their actual damages worth three times their monthly rent, if their landlord is dumb enough to try this. You also get added reasonable attorney's fees," said Ray.

But you need to know there are changes in housing laws at the federal level.

"The CARES Act went into effect," said Taggart. "It only applies at this point to federally backed loan products to apartment communities or single family residences."

For one -- there's an eviction ban for federally backed properties like public and section-8 housing. Landlords cannot evict those tenants for non-payment of rent only until July 25, but they can evict for other reasons.

"We've been telling tenant that if you know you're going to have problems paying your April rent, if once they let the kids out of school in March you couldn't go to work, start that conversation with your landlord now," said Ray.

Another change - federally backed mortgages can be suspended for 90 days.

"Nothing has come out state specific to Alabama yet. I tell people this is a moving target everyday," said Ray

Even with these federal changes, tenants and landlords are still responsible for paying whatever fees they don't pay now at the end of summer.

Legal experts said most tenants, and even some landlords, don't know what type of mortgage they have. For more information about your rights and the type of mortgage you have, contact your local attorney's office who specializes in this type of work.


Need some hope? Look to your neighbors #inthistogether

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - You know the facts, but WHNT News 19 wants to reaffirm your faith. A virus is making hundreds of our neighbors in north Alabama sick, but our sense of community is healthier than ever. The bad is bringing out so much good and you don't have to look very hard to see it.

Educators

We're all adapting, but the first big change to hit our lives was schools closing. The first big challenge then became feeding children who rely on those schools for daily nutrition.

One in five families lives under the poverty line in Alabama and faces food insecurity. Schools play and essential role in getting regular access to healthy meals for their kids. Suddenly losing that access, when hours are being cut and regular jobs are drying up, hurts. But schools and non-profits across north Alabama answered the call for help almost immediately.

Madison County Schools marshaled its food service workers to prepare meals for students in need. Athens City Schools relied on its lunch pail work ethic, too. In Madison City, a local partnership bolstered the schools' response. On Sand Mountain, Marshall County Sheriff's deputies helped to deliver food to students. To the west, the Shoals Dream Center prepared food for Colbert County families in need.

The classrooms may be off limits right now, too, but that hasn't stopped teachers from interacting with their students. All across the Tennessee Valley, educators are taking to the streets parading their commitment to our children.

It's not just teachers and students missing one another. Some principals shared their loneliness without students roaming the halls, while others worked to keep them both informed and entertained.

For the older students, this time of year means something different. Proms, finals and, for seniors, graduation. For many, the pomp and circumstance are rescheduled, so one Madison County senior put his talents to use, uplifting his classmates with a special song.

WHNT News 19 wants to take this moment to say thank you to all of the educators, staff, administrators, everyone out there still working to make sure our students are supported. Your love and generosity are evident and will be remembered for years to come!

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Food Industry

Is there anything more essentially southern than sharing a meal with a neighbor? Access to some food staples has been an issue for the past few weeks. Many are stocking up on food and goods partially out of anxiety, partially out of the desire to limit trips to the store. Others are making sure everyone has enough.


Morgan County Sheriff's Office meal delivery. Courtesy: Morgan County Sheriff's Office Facebook

Morgan County Sheriff's deputies went door-to-door in Decatur to deliver food to seniors. Domaine South, a Huntsville wine bar, set up a free farmers market for hospitality workers affected by restaurant closures.

Hospitality and retail workers are just a few of those standing on the front lines of this pandemic, so Huntsville business leaders started a campaign to raise money to help them out and show their appreciation.

Other business owners are using their time and talents to show local heroes how much they are appreciated. Smallcakes cupcake shop in Huntsville is helping customers send some sweets to those who work in essential businesses.

In Lacey's Spring, you'll find a store owner who's always looking to served the community. A Morgan County Schools staff member said Pam Turney, owner of Graves Grocery, gave away 90 spaghetti dinners, just to offer a ray of sunshine in this difficult season.

WHNT News 19 wants to say thank you to those often taken for granted in the food industry. Whether you're a cook, delivery driver, grocery store associate or anything in between, thank you for what you do for our community!

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Community

There is perhaps no greater example of community service than the work of Rodney Smith Jr. Recently, the mission behind his non-profit, Raising Men Lawn Care, has grown to include dropping off food and supplies on his mowing trips.

Sometimes it's the simplest acts that make us feel the most connected. From sharing some groceries to sharing some laughs.

Huntsville's Shenanigans Comedy Theater is holding drive-thru, family-friendly shows for free. Other cities are hosting drive-thru zoos or bear hunts to help keep children (and adults) entertained while maintaining proper social distance.

Others are calling on their creativity to ensure regular group activities can safely continue. Several dance studios are using technology to hold virtual classes.

WHNT News 19 wants to say thank you to our community, to those staying strong, to those looking out for your neighbors, to those bringing joy into the lives of others. Thank you and keep up the great work!

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Health Care Workers

They're the soldiers on the front lines in this war. And like soldiers, we want them to be as safe as possible while they do something potentially dangerous.

Following a run on personal protective gear, like masks, gloves and gowns, some are sewing backup masks for shortages. A team of 3-D printing hobbyists joined together to print more than 4,000 face shield frames.

Our brewing and distillery community members discovered they had the ability to switch over operations from making spirits to making alcohol pure enough for hand sanitizer.

Alabamians also came out in droves to show their appreciation for all health care workers. Touching tributes filled hospital parking lots all across the Valley, as people flashed vehicle lights, honked horns and prayed.

That's what this comes down to for many. Togetherness and faith. Faith that a higher power is stronger than a virus.

WHNT News 19 wants to say thank you to the doctors, nurses, PCAs, respiratory therapists, advanced practice providers and all the other hospital and clinic employees who make the system function. Thank you for risking your lives to save ours!

Bright Spot

The stories featured here are just a small slice of all the good all throughout our community. It's a challenge to thank everyone out there working right now to keep society running, but we see you, we appreciate you and we love you.

We're also not going to stop looking for these bright spots and we will continue to shine a light on those heroes in our community.

If you see someone going the extra mile, someone who deserves recognition, please take a picture or video and send it to us. We may also be able to send a a crew to cover a great deed. Our goal is to feature these stories daily in a segment called "Bright Spot." WHNT News 19 wants to reinforce the idea that our community is strong and we will get through this together!

Please send "Bright Spot" stories to news.department@whnt.com.


Some states receive masks with dry rot, broken ventilators

Some states and cities that have been shipped masks, gloves, ventilators and other essential equipment from the nation's medical stockpile to fight the coronavirus have gotten an unwelcome surprise: the … Click to Continue »


California issues first new fracking permits since July

California issued 24 hydraulic fracturing permits on Friday, authorizing the first new oil wells in the state since July of last year and angering environmental groups who have been pressuring … Click to Continue »


Saskatoon woman had loss of smell, taste before positive COVID-19 test

Renae Sotnitkow says losing her sense of smell and taste was a red flag something was off. Two days later the 47-year-old mom of two tested positive for COVID-19.


Each state will decide how to ensure essential workers can get child care

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Nexstar) — The $2.2-trillion-dollar coronavirus relief law includes millions in federal funding to keep childcare facilities open for essential workers.

Now it’s up to each state’s governor to determine how to spend the money — and keep childcare facilities open while protecting the children and workers there from the coronavirus.

Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn says many of our frontline workers cannot battle this pandemic without daycare for their children.

That’s why Cornyn says Congress included $3.5 billion to keep childcare facilities operating, as part of the coronavirus relief package.

Linda Smith, Director of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Early Childhood Initiative, says the money goes to states — and state officials must decide how to spend it safely.

“This is risky work,” says Smith. “They are taking the children of people who are out there and exposed. So Governors are now having to think through how do we make some of these decisions.”

Texas Governor Greg Abbott says the 17,000 daycares in the state will now have to start doing health screenings for staff, children and parents.

Lynette Fraga with childcare aware of America says the money will also go towards cleaning supplies.

But she says the $3.5 billion is just a down payment.

“We need so much more, approximately about $50 billion dollars,” says Fraga.

She says that would keep daycares operating through summer. Fraga is asking Congress for the additional money in the next coronavirus relief bill.


Nurse at Stockton’s St. Joseph’s Hospital collapses at home, dies after coronavirus diagnosis

A Lodi registered nurse who died of complications from coronavirus has become another cautionary tale for front-line RNs who say they are desperate for equipment to help treat sick patients. … Click to Continue »


Technology used to overcome impacts of COVID-19 on Edmonton’s real estate market

Edmonton realtors are turning to technology to help with sales as a recent report shows the impacts of COVID-19 on the real estate market.


‘Coronavirus: Facts Not Fear’ evening update – April 3, 2020

(WPRI/NEXSTAR) — As the nation finds itself deep in the throes of a pandemic, Nexstar stations from around the country are providing updates each night at 9 p.m./8 CST with the latest coronavirus headlines.

Tonight, there are new CDC recommendations on face masking but President Trump says he’s not wearing one, the New England Patriots deliver the masks they got in China, the nationwide battle for PPE escalates, and other updates from around the country.

In our live digital show Coronavirus: Facts Not Fear – Evening Update, Friday, April 3, 2020, we have live reports from Providence, Rhode Island; Raleigh, North Carolina; Kansas City, Missouri; Denver, Colorado; and Los Angeles.

In addition to this evening update livestream, Nexstar is also bringing other daily shows at 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. weekdays as well as on Saturday and Sunday at 4 p.m. Over the weekend, we’ll be sitting down with doctors to get your key questions about the coronavirus answered.

If you have a question to be answered in our weekend show, you can email it to coronaquestions@nexstar.tv.


Okanagan paramedic voices concern about proposed wage drop

An Okanagan paramedic is speaking out because under proposed changes to her collective agreement, she’s expecting to sometimes make two dollars an hour for an on-call shift if there aren't any emergencies.


Experts concerned about warm days ahead as Okanagan residents struggle with physical distancing

According to leading health officials, physical distancing is Canada's greatest tool in ‘flattening the curve’ of COVID-19.


City of St. Albert using nocospray to protect against COVID-19

The City of St. Albert is using a disinfecting spray called nocospray to help protect people from the coronavirus. Now, the spray is in high demand.


Fatal Crash South Of Wilder

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

DO NOT REPLY

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 3 Patrol 700 S. Stratford Dr., Meridian 83642

(208) 846-7550

Fax (208) 846-7520

For Immediate Release: 04/03/2020 6:20 p.m.

Please direct questions to the District Office

On Friday, April 3, 2020, at 1:49 p.m., Idaho State Police investigated a fatality crash on Upper Pleasant Ridge Road at Allendale Road, south of Wilder.

Jose A. Flores Nazario, 55, of Nampa, was driving westbound on Upper Pleasant Ridge Road in a 1997 Subaru Legacy. Arturo Cervantes Mendez, 43, of Redmond, WA, was driving northbound on Allendale Road in a 1995 Kenworth truck. Flores Nazario failed to stop at the stop sign, entered into the intersection, and was struck by the Kenworth.

Flores Nazario succumbed to his injures at the scene. Next of kin has been notified. Both drivers were wearing a seatbelt.

3451 / 3642

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CCS Daffodil campaign suspends face-to-face fundraising activities due to COVID-19

Canadian Cancer Society moves Daffodil campaign fundraiser online.


Postmen pals kept apart by coronavirus make video

Nigel Maycock posted the video online showing the pair singing Close To You by The Carpenters.


Domestic abuse charity helping victims isolating with abuser

Restrictions on movement during the coronavirus outbreak are causing problems for people experiencing domestic abuse.


Class action launched as some insurers refuse to pay business interruption insurance

A national class action lawsuit has been launched centering around unpaid business interruption insurance amid COVID-19.


Coronavirus: Canadian banks offer reduced credit card interest rates

CIBC credit card clients who request to skip a payment and are experiencing financial difficulties will receive a temporary lower annual interest rate of 10.99 per cent, the bank announced in a statement.


Coronavirus: Fresno County Superior Court to reopen on limited basis next week

Fresno County Superior Court is scheduled to reopen on Wednesday, April 8 on a limited basis after having been closed for two weeks over concerns about the spread of coronavirus. … Click to Continue »


Anti-abortion group is short of signatures for ban at 22 weeks

An anti-abortion group did not turn in enough valid signatures to place a 22-week abortion ban on Colorado’s November ballot, the Secretary of State’s Office says.

The group, Due Date Too Late, will now have 15 days to collect more signatures. Because of a Denver judge’s order Thursday in favor of the activists, those 15 days will not begin until after the state’s emergency stay-at-home order is lifted.

The proposed Initiative 120 would make performing an abortion after 22 weeks a misdemeanor punishable by a fine, with an exception if it’s to save the mother’s life. A woman receiving an abortion cannot be punished under the proposed law.

Last month, Due Date Too Late turned in 137,624 signatures. An initial sampling found the group was likely short of the 124,632 valid signatures needed. Line-by-line verification of the signatures was then conducted, concluding Friday, and 114,647 signatures were accepted.

“Coloradans have repeatedly rejected abortion bans by landslide margins, so it’s not a surprise that this one failed to gather enough signatures to make the ballot,” said Karen Middleton, president of Cobalt, a Colorado abortion-rights group.


‘Disaster’ feared if sick moved to California nursing homes

A California directive that could open the way for some patients sickened with COVID-19 to be sent from overburdened hospitals to nursing homes is being criticized by industry officials who … Click to Continue »


Lethbridge sexual assault, domestic violence services prepare for increases due to COVID-19

Sexual assault and domestic violence support services in Lethbridge are preparing for an increase in victims seeking resources due to COVID-19.


04-03-20 Temporary one-way traffic pattern notice

Hawaiʻi Police Department                                       
Traffic Services Section
Program Manager, Torey D. Keltner
Phone: (808) 961-2305

 

Media Release

 A temporary one-way traffic pattern will be in effect along a portion of Kapiʻolani Street to accommodate the free Grab-and-Go Student Meals Program at Hilo Union School as approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Hawaii Child Nutrition Programs during the extended school break.

Traffic will be allowed only in the Puna, or southerly, direction on Kapiʻolani Street, between Waiānuenue Avenue and Haili Street during certain hours.

Specifically, the one-way traffic pattern will be in effect beginning Monday, (April 6), through Thursday, (April 30), from 7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. for breakfast service, and from 11:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon for lunch service Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Kapiʻolani Street will be restored to two-way traffic after 8:00 a.m., and after 12:00 noon each service day.

 

 


Is Hong Kong’s Basic Law standing firm at 30?

The Chinese philosopher Confucius, in the Analects, discussed how a man acquires wisdom and fortitude over the years, a process that may also be applicable to Hong Kong’s Basic Law.“At 30, I stood firm,” he wrote. “At 40, I had no more doubts. At 50, I knew the mandate of Heaven.”Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the promulgation of the city’s mini-constitution. On April 4, 1990, the National People’s Congress (NPC) endorsed the final version after a five-year drafting process.At the age…


First response during the reality of COVID-19

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Hartselle man delivers meals to those in need during COVID-19 outbreak

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HARTSELLE, Ala. - There are many people who are being bright spots in our community.

In Hartselle, Wayne Jones started making soup, cornbread, and banana bread for those who are shut-in during the COVID-19 outbreak.

He does this good deed about once or twice a week in his community.

When we asked Jones why he gives back, he replied, "We are all in this together. One person, helping another. I just want to do my part."

Jones said when neighbors tell him they are looking forward to his cooking, it means a million dollars to him.

"He has supplied us with three meals now. The first time was a very big surprise because he went to the front door and I came out the side door. But this man is truly a, he's just a good samaritan, a good Christian person" said one of Jones' friends.

Jones said donations would help him deliver to more families in need. He delivers 40 to 50 meals a week. If you are in the Decatur or Hartselle area and in need of a meal, Jones said to contact him on Facebook.

WHNT News 19 would like to know bright spots throughout North Alabama. You can let us know of good things going on in our community, by emailing us at news@whnt.com.


Telford girl with epilepsy begins treatment despite lockdown

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Montreal families worried about loved ones at Verdun General Hospital following outbreak

As more health professionals in Montreal have been diagnosed with COVID-19 increasing calls for more health care workers to be tested.


Trump administration will reimburse hospitals for treating uninsured coronavirus patients using stimulus funds

(CNN) — The Trump administration will use funds from the $2 trillion federal stimulus package to pay hospitals for treating uninsured coronavirus patients, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said Friday.

The money will come from a $100 billion fund set up to reimburse hospitals and other health care providers for their coronavirus expenses, he said. Providers, who will be paid at Medicare rates, will not be allowed to send bills to the uninsured patients for the cost of their care, Azar added.

The story was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

The potential proposal comes several days after the White House was slammed for deciding not to reopen the Affordable Care Act federal exchanges so the uninsured could sign up for coverage amid a rising wave of job losses.

Insurers, Democrats and at least two Republican governors called upon the administration to create a special enrollment period as the number of Americans falling ill or dying from the coronavirus continues to mount.

Eleven states that run their own Obamacare exchanges, along with the District of Columbia, have launched temporary special enrollment periods. (Those who lose job-based coverage have 60 days to sign up for an Obamacare policy in any state.)

Using stimulus funding to pay for treating the uninsured will divert funds that hospitals say they desperately need for other coronavirus-related expenses, such as personal protective equipment for their workers and additional ventilators and beds. The American Hospital Association called the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which President Donald Trump signed a week ago, “an important first step,” signaling that more money would be needed.

The association did not immediately return a request for comment about the administration’s potential plan.

The legislation set up a $100 billion fund aimed at reimbursing hospitals, health care providers and others for expenses and lost revenue related to the pandemic. Hospitals are expecting to get about $65 billion, according to the association. That money could also be used to reimburse hospitals for treating uninsured patients.

“It leaves less money for other things than an actual coverage expansion,” said Karyn Schwartz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Vice President Mike Pence said Thursday that the proposal would likely tap some of the $100 billion fund already earmarked for hospitals to compensate them for treating uninsured Americans. A final decision would be made Friday, he said.

In addition to the fund, the legislation removed $8 billion in scheduled payment reductions to hospitals that care for large numbers of uninsured and Medicaid patients, though that cut was already expected to be delayed. And an earlier stimulus package gave states the option of covering testing for the uninsured through Medicaid, with the federal government picking up the tab.


Here’s why some Canadian internet providers have hiked prices despite coronavirus

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Walmart to limit number of customers in stores starting April 4

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — Walmart announced on Friday it will start limiting the number of customers allowed in its stores starting on Saturday, April 4.

The company said employees will only allow five customers inside per 1,000 square feet of store space, which equals about 20 percent of a store’s usual capacity.

The average size of a Walmart Supercenter is around 180,000 square feet.

Once the store reaches capacity, customers will be asked to stand in lines outside of the store at a social distance of six feet apart.

Many stores have already marked the sidewalks with signage. As one customer exits the store, associates will allow one more customer inside.

All aisles will be marked as one-way thoroughfares to limit contact between customers. Some stores may also begin selling only essential items.

See the full Walmart press release here.